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Middle School Academics

MIDDLE SCHOOL OVERVIEW

Our curriculum is developed through collaborative planning and is based on the Common Core State Standards as well as the Virginia State Standards and the Ministry of Education (Egypt) curricula. The school has an established curriculum review, development and implementation cycle. Curriculum maps are developed with corresponding unit plans. Alignment is found in the maps, unit plans, lesson plans as well as the assessments. Staff track progress and alter planning as demonstrated by student need. Time is provided for grade meetings as well as subject specific meetings with coordinators. Rigor is valued as evident in the common usage of Bloom’s Taxonomy of Learning Needs in each division. Topics and instructional strategies strive for maximum student engagement in the learning process. Project based learning as well as cooperative learning permit individual students to investigate in depth related and relevant topics of interest. Our goal is to help students to see connections and relationships alongside the acquisition of important basic skills. The aim is for its students to become confident performers, presenters and public speakers and work cooperatively and collaboratively. Students are taught to acknowledge their peers’ points of view and respond in an open minded manner. Students from grades three to nine participate in the MAP (Measure of Academic Progress) assessment twice a year. The scores are gathered and compared to both the African and International benchmarks. Data from this testing informs the implementation of classroom and individual strategies to address identified student learning gaps and needs.

OUR PROGRAM OF STUDIES 

All students are expected to carry a full program of studies. The courses in Middle School are English, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, Foreign Language, Arabic, Computer, Physical Education, Religion, Arabic Social Studies, Art and Music. You can find our supply list for middle school through this link. ( Middle School Supply List )

Our slogan in Kindergarten is “Learning through Play”. The early year’s classroom includes learning centres that offer instruction through various tools that ensure diverse students reach their learning goals. Students experience different strategies that address their individual needs.

Student data is collected every term to measure their achievement against the standards. A plan for each student is created to move to the next step on the journey of meeting the standards.

 

Literacy

Our school has been focusing on literacy as English is a second language for learners.

In Kindergarten planning is done with the end in mind:  Students develop from decoding to reading and writing.

By the end of the of the KG stage, students are expected to:

  • Learn the sound of each letter.
  • Read sight words.
  • Identify fiction and non-fiction texts.
  • Name characters, setting and plot in a story.
  • Write a short sentence using sight words and the correct punctuation to retell a story.
  • Answer questions about key details in a text.
  • Decode words to read from left to right.

 

Numeracy

By the end of the KG stage, students are expected to:

  • Count by ones 1-100.
  • Sort and categorize objects.
  • Compare objects according to size, weight and capacity.
  • Measure objects using standard and non-standard tools.
  • Add and subtract within 20.
  • Identify and describe 2-D and 3-D shapes.

 

Science

By the end of the KG stage, students are expected to:

  • Understand pulling and pushing forces.
  • Experiment on forces that affect speed like weight and direction.
  • Observe the impact of the weather on living organisms.
  • Appreciate how all living things need each other.
  • Practice how to save energy and how to generate it.

 

Social Studies

By the end of the KG stage, students are expected to:

  • Learn how to be a good citizen by being responsible in the classroom, at school, at home, in the community and in the world.
  • Differentiate between needs and wants.
  • Understand the basics of economics in the form of saving and spending money.
  • Appreciate work in the form of being a producer or a service.
  • Reading maps using colors and identifying Egypt and the continents.
  • Take care of the environment through recycling, reusing and reducing products to save the Earth from pollution.
  • Follow rules and staying safe.

 

Social Skills

We teach our students to be long-life learners. They are provoked to be critical thinkers and problem-solvers. Independence and collaboration is encouraged at this age. The diverse classroom community commits students to respect and appreciate personal differences.

 

French

This is an introductory course that provides students with basic communicative skills in French. Students develop the ability to communicate about themselves and the immediate environment using simple sentences containing basic language structures. The early years French course is based on Virginia Standards for French language (FI) aligned with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (DELF A1.1).

By the end of KG stage, students are expected to:

  • Gain confidence and know that they are capable of learning French.
  • Recognize French and identify words to use for communication.
  • Pronounce correctly French words studied in classrooms.
  • Follow simple instructions, such as classroom procedures or directions.

 

German

This is an introductory course that provides students with basic communicative skills in German. Students develop the ability to communicate about themselves and the immediate environment using simple sentences containing basic language structures. The early years German course is based on Virginia Standards for German language aligned with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

By the end of KG stage, students are expected to:

  • Gain confidence and know that they are capable of learning German.
  • Recognize German and identify words to use for communication.
  • Pronounce correctly German words studied in classrooms.
  • Follow simple instructions, such as classroom procedures or directions.

 

Art

Students enhance their cognitive, affective, sensory, and motor development, using a problem-solving approach. Students learn that art is a means for personal expression, has value, teaches about other times and places, and connects in important ways to other areas of learning. Students come to understand that their works of art are unique and valuable as forms of self-expression.

By the end of KG stage, students are expected to:

  • Create works of art that commemorate personal or community events.
  • Create works of art that connect to everyday life.
  • Create works of art that include the human figure as subject matter.
  • Describe the concept that people in all cultures create works of art.
  • Identify spatial relationships—left, right, top, bottom, side, center, front, back, over, and under.
  • Create drawings from observation.
  • Use motor skills (e.g., pinching, pulling, squeezing, twisting, pounding, rolling, folding, cutting, modeling, stamping) to create two-dimensional and three-dimensional works of art.
  • Select a preferred work of art and explain the preference.
  • Describe ideas, experiences, and feelings expressed in personal and other works of art.

 

Physical Education

Participating in a variety of movement experiences to develop fundamental movement patterns is the primary focus of the kindergarten physical education curriculum. Students at this level vary in maturity across all movement skills; they demonstrate continuous improvement in movement under very simple conditions. While developing fundamental skill patterns, students begin to learn key movement concepts that help them perform in a variety of educational games, dances, and gymnastics. They learn how their bodies react to vigorous physical activity. Students learn to use safe practices, cooperate with and respect others, and follow classroom rules. Experiences in physical education help them develop a positive attitude for leading a healthy, active lifestyle.

By the end of KG stage, students are expected to:

  • Explain that the body has muscles and bones that help the body move.
  • Demonstrate the concept of personal space.
  • Demonstrate approaching-mature form (at least two critical elements: which are small, isolated parts of the whole skill or movement) used in stationary manipulative skills for tossing and throwing underhand to targets, bounce and catch, toss and catch, kicking stationary ball to target, striking stationary object with paddle, dribbling, rolling ball underhand to target, trapping and volleying with hand.
  • Demonstrate a minimum of two critical elements used in manipulative skills while moving, to include dribbling with continuous kick (taps) of ball while walking.
  • Explain that physical activity helps the body grow.
  • Identify activities that can be done at home to keep the body healthy.
  • Identify physical activities that are done with family and with friends for fun
  • Demonstrate cooperative and safe play.
  • Demonstrate general and personal space.
  • Identify three classroom (procedural) rules.

 

Music

During the kindergarten years, students focus on basic musical concepts through singing, playing instruments, listening, and moving. Emphasis is placed on beginning to obtain musical knowledge, skills, and understanding as performers, composers, and listeners. Students investigate personal feelings and preferences evoked by musical experiences.

By the end of KG stage, students are expected to:

  • Read music, including high and low pitches and rhythms.
  • Investigate various uses of the voice.
  • Sing a variety of songs of limited range alone and with others.
  • Play a variety of pitched and nonpitched instruments alone and with others.
  • Perform rhythmic patterns.
  • Demonstrate a steady beat.
  • Respond to music with movement.
  • Explore historical and cultural aspects of music.
  • Participate in music activities.
  • Recognize the relationships between music and other fields of knowledge.
  • Express personal feelings evoked
  • Communicate personal response to expressive features of music.

English

The Middle School English Language Arts curriculum is aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The course provides a balance of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language cumulative skills essential for success in the 21st Century. Students read and comprehend a variety of informational and literary texts. Students use a variety of strategies to plan, revise, and edit their writing as they work collaboratively and independently to produce texts. Students complete research projects, present their findings, and participate effectively in a range of conversations and collaborations with their peers. They apply knowledge of language conventions to correct errors, refine expression, and present their work effectively.

By the end of Grade 7, students are expected to:

  • Read, comprehend, and analyze literary nonfiction and literary texts, including stories, dramas, and poetry, at the high end of grade 7 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed.
  • Recognize, interpret, and make connections in narratives, poetry, and drama, ethically and artistically to other texts.
  • Write clear and coherent arguments, informative/explanatory, and narratives in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
  • Develop and strengthen the writing by planning, revising, editing, and rewriting and by using technology, including the internet, to produce and publish writing.
  • Conduct short research projects, drawing on several sources and generating additional related, focused questions for further research and investigation.
  • Acquire and use accurately specific words and phrases and demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.
  • Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.
  • Engage in a range of collaborative discussions and with diverse partners on various topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.

 

Mathematics

During middle school, fractions are augmented by negative fractions to form the rational numbers. In Grade 8, students extend this system once more, augmenting the rational numbers with the irrational numbers to form the real numbers. Introduction to functions and equations take place. More understanding of geometric concepts and applications occur.

By the end of Grade 7, students are expected to:

  • Develop an understanding of and applying proportional relationships.
  • Develop an understanding of operations with rational numbers and working with expressions and linear equations.
  • Solve problems involving scale drawings and informal geometric constructions, and working with two- and three-dimensional shapes to solve problems involving area, surface area, and volume.
  • Draw inferences about populations based on samples.

 

Science

During grades six to eight, students begin to form deeper connections between concepts previously learned such as collecting evidence and drawing conclusions, understanding relationships between objects, and critical thinking that leads to designing effective solutions for problems. Students learn problem solving skills by asking questions and defining problems, analyzing and interpreting data and then designing and optimizing a model to develop possible solutions.

By the end of Grade 7, students are expected to:

  • Conduct an investigation cells by identifying types of cells and to describing the function of a cell as a whole and the ways the parts of cells contribute to function.
  • Use argument supported by evidence to show how the body is a system of interacting subsystems composed of groups of cells.
  • Develop and use a model to describe why asexual reproduction results in offspring with identical genetic information and sexual reproduction results in offspring with genetic variation.
  • Construct a scientific explanation based on evidence for the role of photosynthesis in the cycling of matter and flow of energy into and out of organisms.
  • Construct an explanation that predicts patterns of interactions among organisms across multiple ecosystems and design solutions for maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem services.
  • Use mathematical representations to describe a simple model for waves that includes how the amplitude of a wave is related to the energy in a wave. Emphasis is on describing waves with both qualitative and quantitative thinking.

 

Social Studies

Students explore the historical development of people, places, and patterns of life from ancient times in terms of the impact on Western civilization.  They are engaged in historical thinking. They draw upon chronological thinking, historical comprehension, historical analysis and interpretation, historical research, and decision making. These skills are developed through the study of significant historical substance from the era or society being studied. During grade seven students use skills for historical and geographical analysis to explore the early history of the United States and understand ideas and events that strengthened the union. Students will also practice the intellectual skills required for responsible citizenship as they extend their understanding of the essential knowledge defined by all of the standards for history and social science. During grade eight, students study of the world’s peoples, places, and environments, with an emphasis on world regions.

By the end of Grade 7, students are expected to:

  • Apply social science skills to understand how early cultures developed in North America.
  • Apply social science skills to understand European exploration in North America and West Africa.
  • Apply social science skills to understand the factors that shaped colonial America.
  • Apply social science skills to understand the causes and results of the American Revolution.

 

Computer

Students use more advanced filters in MS-Excel such as conditional formatting and math functions. They enhance their critical thinking and solving problems through using logic functions and complex formulas. Students are introduced to advanced programs in digital art, MS- Publisher. During the final stage of middle school, students create a website and publish online. They also learn how to use an animated presentation program for presenting animated stories. Students learn an advanced coding program: MS-Small Basic.

By the end of Grade 7, students are expected to:

  • Use MS Excel and MS Publisher
  • Create multiple types of publications such as (Calendars, Magazines, Invitation cards, Event brochures, and Newspaper) in a professional way by using [MS Publisher] program.
  • Use computer proficiency to complete projects and coursework for other subjects.

 

French

In middle school, the French course is based on Virginia Standards for French language FIII aligned with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages DELF A1 junior.

In French III, students continue to develop their communicative and cultural competence by interacting orally and in writing with other speakers of French, understanding oral and written messages in the language, and making oral and written presentations in French. They communicate on a variety of topics at a level commensurate with their study, using more complex structures in the language and moving from concrete to more abstract concepts in a variety of time frames.

By the end of Grade 7, students are expected to:

  • Use level-appropriate vocabulary and structures to express ideas about topics and events found in a variety of authentic French language sources.
  • Exchange detailed information on familiar topics in a variety of interpersonal contexts.
  • The student will present information orally and in written French, recombining familiar elements to create original sentences in paragraphs that are increasingly complex.
  • Use various verbal and nonverbal presentational techniques, such as voice inflection, visual aids and technological support.

 

German

In middle school, the German course is based on Virginia Standards for the German language aligned with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. Students continue to develop their communicative and cultural competence by interacting orally and in writing with other speakers of German, understanding oral and written messages in the language, and making oral and written presentations in German. They communicate on a variety of topics at a level commensurate with their study, using more complex structures in the language and moving from concrete to more abstract concepts in a variety of time frames.

By the end of Grade 7, students are expected to:

  • Develop their communicative competence by interacting orally and in writing with other German speakers
  • Understand oral and written messages in German
  • Making oral and written presentations in German.
  • Show a greater level of accuracy when using basic language structures.

 

Art

During middle school, students experience emphasis on exploration of studio processes. Using the elements of art (color, form, line, shape, space, texture, value) and the principles of design (balance, contrast, emphasis, movement, pattern, proportion, rhythm, unity, variety) as a framework, students investigate a variety of ideas for creating art. Through critical analysis and evaluation, students determine how artists convey meaning through the use of forms, media, and symbols.

By the end of Grade 7, students are expected to:

  • Identify styles and themes in contemporary and historical works of art.
  • Analyze how art and culture influence each other.
  • Identify the uses and impact of persuasive techniques (e.g., selection of images, design, type, media) in print and contemporary media.
  • Compare and contrast various visual arts careers in relation to career preparation.

 

Physical Education

Students in middle school ­apply fundamental skills and knowledge of anatomical structures and movement principles to build movement competence and confidence through acquisition, performance, and refinement of skills. Students use feedback to initiate and maintain practice to improve skill performance. Students assess their health-related fitness status and set reasonable and appropriate goals for development, maintenance, and improvement. Students explain the connection between energy balance and nutrition guidelines, meal planning, and heart rate. Students solve problems and make responsible decisions as they work together. They identify and seek opportunities to participate in regular physical activity at school and outside the school environment.

By the end of Grade 7, students are expected to:

  • Demonstrate and apply mature movement forms and skill combinations competently in a variety of cooperative and tactical activities that include dynamic and unpredictable situations.
  • Demonstrate offensive strategies and tactics, to include creating open space, skilled movement, speed, accuracy, and selection of appropriate skill/tactic to gain offensive advantage.
  • Demonstrate basic abilities and safety precautions in recreational pursuits (e.g., in-line skating, orienteering, hiking, cycling, ropes courses, backpacking, canoeing, rock climbing).
  • ­Create and demonstrate movements appropriate to a variety of rhythm patterns in selected folk, social, world, country, square, contemporary, and line dances.
  • Analyze skill patterns and movement performance of self and others, detecting and correcting mechanical errors and describing balance in the planes of movement for selected movements.

 

Music

During the Middle school years, students count, read, and perform music at Solo Literature Grade Levels 1 and 2 of the Virginia Band and Orchestra Directors Association (VBODA). Students focus on instrumental music.  Students begin receiving instruction on wind, percussion, or string instruments of their choice with guidance from the music teacher. Students demonstrate proper care of instruments and become familiar with the technology of the instrument. They demonstrate basic positions, fingerings, and tone production.  Students begin to describe, respond to, interpret, and evaluate works of music and create basic variations of simple melodies.

By the end of middle school students are expected to:

  • Demonstrate preparatory instrumental basics and playing procedures.
  •  Demonstrate proper instrumental techniques.
  • Demonstrate ensemble skills at a beginning level.
  •  Read and interpret standard music notation while performing music of varying styles and levels of difficulty.
  • Begin to use articulations, dynamic contrasts, and phrasing as means of expression.
  • Perform simple rhythmic and melodic examples in call-and-response styles.
  • Create, through playing and writing, rhythmic variations of four-measure selections.
  •  Demonstrate musicianship and personal engagement.
  •  Sight-read music of varying styles and levels of difficulty.
  • Explore historical and cultural aspects of music.
  •  Analyze and evaluate music.
  •  Investigate aesthetic concepts related to music.

English

The Middle School English Language Arts curriculum is aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The course provides a balance of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language cumulative skills essential for success in the 21st Century. Students read and comprehend a variety of informational and literary texts. Students use a variety of strategies to plan, revise, and edit their writing as they work collaboratively and independently to produce texts. Students complete research projects, present their findings, and participate effectively in a range of conversations and collaborations with their peers. They apply knowledge of language conventions to correct errors, refine expression, and present their work effectively.

By the end of Grade 8, students are expected to:

  • Read, comprehend, and analyze literary nonfiction and literary texts, including stories, dramas, and poetry, with complexity and proficiently.
  • Make connections in narratives, poetry, and drama, ethically and artistically to other texts.
  • Write clear and coherent arguments, informative/explanatory, and narratives in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
  • Use technology, including the internet, to produce and publish writing and present the relationships between information and ideas efficiently as well as to interact and collaborate with others.
  • Conduct short research projects, drawing on several sources and generating additional related, focused questions that allow for multiple avenues of exploration.
  • Clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple- meaning words or phrases based on grade 8 reading and content phrases by using context clues.
  • Participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions and with diverse partners on grade 8 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.

 

Mathematics

During middle school, fractions are augmented by negative fractions to form the rational numbers. In Grade 8, students extend this system once more, augmenting the rational numbers with the irrational numbers to form the real numbers. Introduction to functions and equations take place. More understanding of geometric concepts and applications occur.

By the end of Grade 8, students are expected to:

  • Formulate and reason about expressions and equations, including modeling an association in bivariate data with a linear equation, and solving linear equations and systems of linear equations.
  • Grasp the concept of a function and using functions to describe quantitative relationships.
  • Analyze two- and three-dimensional space and figures using distance, angle, similarity, and congruence, and understanding and applying the Pythagorean Theorem.

 

Science

During grades six to eight, students begin to form deeper connections between concepts previously learned such as collecting evidence and drawing conclusions, understanding relationships between objects, and critical thinking that leads to designing effective solutions for problems. Students learn problem solving skills by asking questions and defining problems, analyzing and interpreting data and then designing and optimizing a model to develop possible solutions.

By the end of Grade 8, students are expected to:

  • Explain how the body is a system of interacting subsystems composed of groups of cells.
  • Apply Newton’s Third Law of Motion to relate forces when explaining the motion of objects. Plan an investigation to provide evidence that the change in an object’s motion depends on the sum of the forces on the object and the mass of the object.
  • Understand Earth’s place in the Universe, what makes up our solar system, and how can the motion of Earth explains seasons and eclipses.
  • Analyze and interpret data for patterns in the fossil record that document the existence, diversity, extinction, and change of life forms throughout the history of life on Earth under the assumption that natural laws operate today as in the past.
  • Construct an explanation based on evidence that describes how genetic variations of traits in a population increase some individuals’ probability of surviving and reproducing in a specific environment.

 

Social Studies

Students explore the historical development of people, places, and patterns of life from ancient times in terms of the impact on Western civilization.  They are engaged in historical thinking. They draw upon chronological thinking, historical comprehension, historical analysis and interpretation, historical research, and decision making. These skills are developed through the study of significant historical substance from the era or society being studied. During grade seven students use skills for historical and geographical analysis to explore the early history of the United States and understand ideas and events that strengthened the union. Students will also practice the intellectual skills required for responsible citizenship as they extend their understanding of the essential knowledge defined by all of the standards for history and social science. During grade eight, students study of the world’s peoples, places, and environments, with an emphasis on world regions.

By the end of Grade 8, students are expected to:

  • Analyze the characteristics of the Sub-Saharan African region.
  • Analyze the characteristics of the North African and Southwest Asian regions.
  • Apply social science skills to understand the ancient river valley civilizations, including those of Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Indus River Valley, and China and the civilizations of the Hebrews and Phoenicians.
  • Apply social science skills to understand Western Europe during the Middle Ages from about 500 to 1000 A.D. in terms of its impact on Western civilization.
  • Apply social science skills to understand the civilizations and empires of Africa, with emphasis on the African kingdoms of Axum and Zimbabwe and the West African civilizations of Ghana, Mali, and Songhai.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the political, cultural, geographic, and economic conditions in sub-Saharan Africa from about 1500 A.D. to about 1800 A.D.

 

Computer

Students use more advanced filters in MS-Excel such as conditional formatting and math functions. They enhance their critical thinking and solving problems through using logic functions and complex formulas. Students are introduced to advanced programs in digital art, MS- Publisher. During the final stage of middle school, students create a website and publish online. They also learn how to use an animated presentation program for presenting animated stories. Students learn an advanced coding program: MS-Small Basic.

By the end of Grade 8, students are expected to:

  • Learn programming using Small Basic to create simple programs and evaluate them
  • Create multiple types of animation, videos, and illustrations by using Explaindio
  • Learn the basics of creating websites for free by using Com.

 

French

In middle school, the French course is based on Virginia Standards for French language FIII aligned with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages DELF A1 junior.

In French III, students continue to develop their communicative and cultural competence by interacting orally and in writing with other speakers of French, understanding oral and written messages in the language, and making oral and written presentations in French. They communicate on a variety of topics at a level commensurate with their study, using more complex structures in the language and moving from concrete to more abstract concepts in a variety of time frames.

By the end of Grade 8, students are expected to:

  • Use level-appropriate vocabulary and structures to express ideas about topics and events found in a variety of authentic French language sources.
  • Understand culturally authentic, level-appropriate materials that present new information in familiar contexts.
  • Understand and respond appropriately to instruction presented in more complex informational materials.
  • Produce well-organized spoken and written presentations to suit the type of audience.
  • Participate in brief oral and written exchanges that reflect present, past, and future time frames.

 

German

In middle school, the German course is based on Virginia Standards for the German language aligned with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. Students continue to develop their communicative and cultural competence by interacting orally and in writing with other speakers of German, understanding oral and written messages in the language, and making oral and written presentations in German. They communicate on a variety of topics at a level commensurate with their study, using more complex structures in the language and moving from concrete to more abstract concepts in a variety of time frames.

By the end of Grade 8, the students are expected to:

  • Understand phrases and the highest frequency vocabulary related to areas of most immediate personal relevance.
  • Catch the main point in short, clear, simple messages and announcements.
  • Read very short, simple texts.
  • Find specific, predictable information in simple everyday material such as advertisements, prospectuses, menus and timetables and he can understand short simple personal letters.
  • Communicate using a simple and direct exchange of information on familiar topics and activities.
  • Use a series of phrases and sentences to describe in simple term.
  • Write short, simple notes and messages relating to matters in areas of immediate need.

 

Art

During middle school, students experience emphasis on exploration of studio processes. Using the elements of art (color, form, line, shape, space, texture, value) and the principles of design (balance, contrast, emphasis, movement, pattern, proportion, rhythm, unity, variety) as a framework, students investigate a variety of ideas for creating art. Through critical analysis and evaluation, students determine how artists convey meaning through the use of forms, media, and symbols.

By the end of Grade 8, students are expected to:

  • Plan for and reflect on the art-making process, using a sketchbook/journal.
  • Develop and use a process art portfolio as an idea-building resource to create works of art.
  • Refine personal works of art to improve quality of craftsmanship.
  • Synthesize prior knowledge and experience to create works of art.

 

Physical Education

Students in middle school ­apply fundamental skills and knowledge of anatomical structures and movement principles to build movement competence and confidence through acquisition, performance, and refinement of skills. Students use feedback to initiate and maintain practice to improve skill performance. Students assess their health-related fitness status and set reasonable and appropriate goals for development, maintenance, and improvement. Students explain the connection between energy balance and nutrition guidelines, meal planning, and heart rate. Students solve problems and make responsible decisions as they work together. They identify and seek opportunities to participate in regular physical activity at school and outside the school environment.

By the end of Grade 8, students are expected to:

  • Demonstrate and apply movement forms to a variety of cooperative and tactical activities that include dynamic and unpredictable situations with a focus on defensive strategies, to include reducing space, transitioning from offense to defense quickly, communicating with teammates, and selecting appropriate tactics to gain defensive advantage.
  • Create a rhythmic movement sequence to music as an individual or in a group.
  • Demonstrate skill-related components of fitness (agility, balance, coordination, power, reaction time, and speed) specific to a variety of activities.
  • Apply and demonstrate biomechanical principles of force, motion (laws of motion), rotation, and energy.
  • Describe the relationship between poor caloric intake and health risk factors.
  • Explain the role of energy balance in weight management and body composition

 

Music

During the Middle school years, students count, read, and perform music at Solo Literature Grade Levels 1 and 2 of the Virginia Band and Orchestra Directors Association (VBODA). Students focus on instrumental music.  Students begin receiving instruction on wind, percussion, or string instruments of their choice with guidance from the music teacher. Students demonstrate proper care of instruments and become familiar with the technology of the instrument. They demonstrate basic positions, fingerings, and tone production.  Students begin to describe, respond to, interpret, and evaluate works of music and create basic variations of simple melodies.

By the end of middle school students are expected to:

  • Demonstrate preparatory instrumental basics and playing procedures.
  •  Demonstrate proper instrumental techniques.
  • Demonstrate ensemble skills at a beginning level.
  •  Read and interpret standard music notation while performing music of varying styles and levels of difficulty.
  • Begin to use articulations, dynamic contrasts, and phrasing as means of expression.
  • Perform simple rhythmic and melodic examples in call-and-response styles.
  • Create, through playing and writing, rhythmic variations of four-measure selections.
  •  Demonstrate musicianship and personal engagement.
  •  Sight-read music of varying styles and levels of difficulty.
  • Explore historical and cultural aspects of music.
  •  Analyze and evaluate music.
  •  Investigate aesthetic concepts related to music.

Our slogan in Kindergarten is “Learning through Play”. The early year’s classroom includes learning centres that offer instruction through various tools that ensure diverse students reach their learning goals. Students experience different strategies that address their individual needs.

Student data is collected every term to measure their achievement against the standards. A plan for each student is created to move to the next step on the journey of meeting the standards.

 

Literacy

Our school has been focusing on literacy as English is a second language for learners.

In Kindergarten planning is done with the end in mind:  Students develop from decoding to reading and writing.

By the end of the of the KG stage, students are expected to:

  • Learn the sound of each letter.
  • Read sight words.
  • Identify fiction and non-fiction texts.
  • Name characters, setting and plot in a story.
  • Write a short sentence using sight words and the correct punctuation to retell a story.
  • Answer questions about key details in a text.
  • Decode words to read from left to right.

 

Numeracy

By the end of the KG stage, students are expected to:

  • Count by ones 1-100.
  • Sort and categorize objects.
  • Compare objects according to size, weight and capacity.
  • Measure objects using standard and non-standard tools.
  • Add and subtract within 20.
  • Identify and describe 2-D and 3-D shapes.

 

Science

By the end of the KG stage, students are expected to:

  • Understand pulling and pushing forces.
  • Experiment on forces that affect speed like weight and direction.
  • Observe the impact of the weather on living organisms.
  • Appreciate how all living things need each other.
  • Practice how to save energy and how to generate it.

 

Social Studies

By the end of the KG stage, students are expected to:

  • Learn how to be a good citizen by being responsible in the classroom, at school, at home, in the community and in the world.
  • Differentiate between needs and wants.
  • Understand the basics of economics in the form of saving and spending money.
  • Appreciate work in the form of being a producer or a service.
  • Reading maps using colors and identifying Egypt and the continents.
  • Take care of the environment through recycling, reusing and reducing products to save the Earth from pollution.
  • Follow rules and staying safe.

 

Social Skills

We teach our students to be long-life learners. They are provoked to be critical thinkers and problem-solvers. Independence and collaboration is encouraged at this age. The diverse classroom community commits students to respect and appreciate personal differences.

 

French

This is an introductory course that provides students with basic communicative skills in French. Students develop the ability to communicate about themselves and the immediate environment using simple sentences containing basic language structures. The early years French course is based on Virginia Standards for French language (FI) aligned with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (DELF A1.1).

By the end of KG stage, students are expected to:

  • Gain confidence and know that they are capable of learning French.
  • Recognize French and identify words to use for communication.
  • Pronounce correctly French words studied in classrooms.
  • Follow simple instructions, such as classroom procedures or directions.

 

German

This is an introductory course that provides students with basic communicative skills in German. Students develop the ability to communicate about themselves and the immediate environment using simple sentences containing basic language structures. The early years German course is based on Virginia Standards for German language aligned with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

By the end of KG stage, students are expected to:

  • Gain confidence and know that they are capable of learning German.
  • Recognize German and identify words to use for communication.
  • Pronounce correctly German words studied in classrooms.
  • Follow simple instructions, such as classroom procedures or directions.

 

Art

Students enhance their cognitive, affective, sensory, and motor development, using a problem-solving approach. Students learn that art is a means for personal expression, has value, teaches about other times and places, and connects in important ways to other areas of learning. Students come to understand that their works of art are unique and valuable as forms of self-expression.

By the end of KG stage, students are expected to:

  • Create works of art that commemorate personal or community events.
  • Create works of art that connect to everyday life.
  • Create works of art that include the human figure as subject matter.
  • Describe the concept that people in all cultures create works of art.
  • Identify spatial relationships—left, right, top, bottom, side, center, front, back, over, and under.
  • Create drawings from observation.
  • Use motor skills (e.g., pinching, pulling, squeezing, twisting, pounding, rolling, folding, cutting, modeling, stamping) to create two-dimensional and three-dimensional works of art.
  • Select a preferred work of art and explain the preference.
  • Describe ideas, experiences, and feelings expressed in personal and other works of art.

 

Physical Education

Participating in a variety of movement experiences to develop fundamental movement patterns is the primary focus of the kindergarten physical education curriculum. Students at this level vary in maturity across all movement skills; they demonstrate continuous improvement in movement under very simple conditions. While developing fundamental skill patterns, students begin to learn key movement concepts that help them perform in a variety of educational games, dances, and gymnastics. They learn how their bodies react to vigorous physical activity. Students learn to use safe practices, cooperate with and respect others, and follow classroom rules. Experiences in physical education help them develop a positive attitude for leading a healthy, active lifestyle.

By the end of KG stage, students are expected to:

  • Explain that the body has muscles and bones that help the body move.
  • Demonstrate the concept of personal space.
  • Demonstrate approaching-mature form (at least two critical elements: which are small, isolated parts of the whole skill or movement) used in stationary manipulative skills for tossing and throwing underhand to targets, bounce and catch, toss and catch, kicking stationary ball to target, striking stationary object with paddle, dribbling, rolling ball underhand to target, trapping and volleying with hand.
  • Demonstrate a minimum of two critical elements used in manipulative skills while moving, to include dribbling with continuous kick (taps) of ball while walking.
  • Explain that physical activity helps the body grow.
  • Identify activities that can be done at home to keep the body healthy.
  • Identify physical activities that are done with family and with friends for fun
  • Demonstrate cooperative and safe play.
  • Demonstrate general and personal space.
  • Identify three classroom (procedural) rules.

 

Music

During the kindergarten years, students focus on basic musical concepts through singing, playing instruments, listening, and moving. Emphasis is placed on beginning to obtain musical knowledge, skills, and understanding as performers, composers, and listeners. Students investigate personal feelings and preferences evoked by musical experiences.

By the end of KG stage, students are expected to:

  • Read music, including high and low pitches and rhythms.
  • Investigate various uses of the voice.
  • Sing a variety of songs of limited range alone and with others.
  • Play a variety of pitched and nonpitched instruments alone and with others.
  • Perform rhythmic patterns.
  • Demonstrate a steady beat.
  • Respond to music with movement.
  • Explore historical and cultural aspects of music.
  • Participate in music activities.
  • Recognize the relationships between music and other fields of knowledge.
  • Express personal feelings evoked
  • Communicate personal response to expressive features of music.

English

The Middle School English Language Arts curriculum is aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The course provides a balance of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language cumulative skills essential for success in the 21st Century. Students read and comprehend a variety of informational and literary texts. Students use a variety of strategies to plan, revise, and edit their writing as they work collaboratively and independently to produce texts. Students complete research projects, present their findings, and participate effectively in a range of conversations and collaborations with their peers. They apply knowledge of language conventions to correct errors, refine expression, and present their work effectively.

By the end of Grade 7, students are expected to:

  • Read, comprehend, and analyze literary nonfiction and literary texts, including stories, dramas, and poetry, at the high end of grade 7 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed.
  • Recognize, interpret, and make connections in narratives, poetry, and drama, ethically and artistically to other texts.
  • Write clear and coherent arguments, informative/explanatory, and narratives in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
  • Develop and strengthen the writing by planning, revising, editing, and rewriting and by using technology, including the internet, to produce and publish writing.
  • Conduct short research projects, drawing on several sources and generating additional related, focused questions for further research and investigation.
  • Acquire and use accurately specific words and phrases and demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.
  • Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.
  • Engage in a range of collaborative discussions and with diverse partners on various topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.

 

Mathematics

During middle school, fractions are augmented by negative fractions to form the rational numbers. In Grade 8, students extend this system once more, augmenting the rational numbers with the irrational numbers to form the real numbers. Introduction to functions and equations take place. More understanding of geometric concepts and applications occur.

By the end of Grade 7, students are expected to:

  • Develop an understanding of and applying proportional relationships.
  • Develop an understanding of operations with rational numbers and working with expressions and linear equations.
  • Solve problems involving scale drawings and informal geometric constructions, and working with two- and three-dimensional shapes to solve problems involving area, surface area, and volume.
  • Draw inferences about populations based on samples.

 

Science

During grades six to eight, students begin to form deeper connections between concepts previously learned such as collecting evidence and drawing conclusions, understanding relationships between objects, and critical thinking that leads to designing effective solutions for problems. Students learn problem solving skills by asking questions and defining problems, analyzing and interpreting data and then designing and optimizing a model to develop possible solutions.

By the end of Grade 7, students are expected to:

  • Conduct an investigation cells by identifying types of cells and to describing the function of a cell as a whole and the ways the parts of cells contribute to function.
  • Use argument supported by evidence to show how the body is a system of interacting subsystems composed of groups of cells.
  • Develop and use a model to describe why asexual reproduction results in offspring with identical genetic information and sexual reproduction results in offspring with genetic variation.
  • Construct a scientific explanation based on evidence for the role of photosynthesis in the cycling of matter and flow of energy into and out of organisms.
  • Construct an explanation that predicts patterns of interactions among organisms across multiple ecosystems and design solutions for maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem services.
  • Use mathematical representations to describe a simple model for waves that includes how the amplitude of a wave is related to the energy in a wave. Emphasis is on describing waves with both qualitative and quantitative thinking.

 

Social Studies

Students explore the historical development of people, places, and patterns of life from ancient times in terms of the impact on Western civilization.  They are engaged in historical thinking. They draw upon chronological thinking, historical comprehension, historical analysis and interpretation, historical research, and decision making. These skills are developed through the study of significant historical substance from the era or society being studied. During grade seven students use skills for historical and geographical analysis to explore the early history of the United States and understand ideas and events that strengthened the union. Students will also practice the intellectual skills required for responsible citizenship as they extend their understanding of the essential knowledge defined by all of the standards for history and social science. During grade eight, students study of the world’s peoples, places, and environments, with an emphasis on world regions.

By the end of Grade 7, students are expected to:

  • Apply social science skills to understand how early cultures developed in North America.
  • Apply social science skills to understand European exploration in North America and West Africa.
  • Apply social science skills to understand the factors that shaped colonial America.
  • Apply social science skills to understand the causes and results of the American Revolution.

 

Computer

Students use more advanced filters in MS-Excel such as conditional formatting and math functions. They enhance their critical thinking and solving problems through using logic functions and complex formulas. Students are introduced to advanced programs in digital art, MS- Publisher. During the final stage of middle school, students create a website and publish online. They also learn how to use an animated presentation program for presenting animated stories. Students learn an advanced coding program: MS-Small Basic.

By the end of Grade 7, students are expected to:

  • Use MS Excel and MS Publisher
  • Create multiple types of publications such as (Calendars, Magazines, Invitation cards, Event brochures, and Newspaper) in a professional way by using [MS Publisher] program.
  • Use computer proficiency to complete projects and coursework for other subjects.

 

French

In middle school, the French course is based on Virginia Standards for French language FIII aligned with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages DELF A1 junior.

In French III, students continue to develop their communicative and cultural competence by interacting orally and in writing with other speakers of French, understanding oral and written messages in the language, and making oral and written presentations in French. They communicate on a variety of topics at a level commensurate with their study, using more complex structures in the language and moving from concrete to more abstract concepts in a variety of time frames.

By the end of Grade 7, students are expected to:

  • Use level-appropriate vocabulary and structures to express ideas about topics and events found in a variety of authentic French language sources.
  • Exchange detailed information on familiar topics in a variety of interpersonal contexts.
  • The student will present information orally and in written French, recombining familiar elements to create original sentences in paragraphs that are increasingly complex.
  • Use various verbal and nonverbal presentational techniques, such as voice inflection, visual aids and technological support.

 

German

In middle school, the German course is based on Virginia Standards for the German language aligned with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. Students continue to develop their communicative and cultural competence by interacting orally and in writing with other speakers of German, understanding oral and written messages in the language, and making oral and written presentations in German. They communicate on a variety of topics at a level commensurate with their study, using more complex structures in the language and moving from concrete to more abstract concepts in a variety of time frames.

By the end of Grade 7, students are expected to:

  • Develop their communicative competence by interacting orally and in writing with other German speakers
  • Understand oral and written messages in German
  • Making oral and written presentations in German.
  • Show a greater level of accuracy when using basic language structures.

 

Art

During middle school, students experience emphasis on exploration of studio processes. Using the elements of art (color, form, line, shape, space, texture, value) and the principles of design (balance, contrast, emphasis, movement, pattern, proportion, rhythm, unity, variety) as a framework, students investigate a variety of ideas for creating art. Through critical analysis and evaluation, students determine how artists convey meaning through the use of forms, media, and symbols.

By the end of Grade 7, students are expected to:

  • Identify styles and themes in contemporary and historical works of art.
  • Analyze how art and culture influence each other.
  • Identify the uses and impact of persuasive techniques (e.g., selection of images, design, type, media) in print and contemporary media.
  • Compare and contrast various visual arts careers in relation to career preparation.

 

Physical Education

Students in middle school ­apply fundamental skills and knowledge of anatomical structures and movement principles to build movement competence and confidence through acquisition, performance, and refinement of skills. Students use feedback to initiate and maintain practice to improve skill performance. Students assess their health-related fitness status and set reasonable and appropriate goals for development, maintenance, and improvement. Students explain the connection between energy balance and nutrition guidelines, meal planning, and heart rate. Students solve problems and make responsible decisions as they work together. They identify and seek opportunities to participate in regular physical activity at school and outside the school environment.

By the end of Grade 7, students are expected to:

  • Demonstrate and apply mature movement forms and skill combinations competently in a variety of cooperative and tactical activities that include dynamic and unpredictable situations.
  • Demonstrate offensive strategies and tactics, to include creating open space, skilled movement, speed, accuracy, and selection of appropriate skill/tactic to gain offensive advantage.
  • Demonstrate basic abilities and safety precautions in recreational pursuits (e.g., in-line skating, orienteering, hiking, cycling, ropes courses, backpacking, canoeing, rock climbing).
  • ­Create and demonstrate movements appropriate to a variety of rhythm patterns in selected folk, social, world, country, square, contemporary, and line dances.
  • Analyze skill patterns and movement performance of self and others, detecting and correcting mechanical errors and describing balance in the planes of movement for selected movements.

 

Music

During the Middle school years, students count, read, and perform music at Solo Literature Grade Levels 1 and 2 of the Virginia Band and Orchestra Directors Association (VBODA). Students focus on instrumental music.  Students begin receiving instruction on wind, percussion, or string instruments of their choice with guidance from the music teacher. Students demonstrate proper care of instruments and become familiar with the technology of the instrument. They demonstrate basic positions, fingerings, and tone production.  Students begin to describe, respond to, interpret, and evaluate works of music and create basic variations of simple melodies.

By the end of middle school students are expected to:

  • Demonstrate preparatory instrumental basics and playing procedures.
  •  Demonstrate proper instrumental techniques.
  • Demonstrate ensemble skills at a beginning level.
  •  Read and interpret standard music notation while performing music of varying styles and levels of difficulty.
  • Begin to use articulations, dynamic contrasts, and phrasing as means of expression.
  • Perform simple rhythmic and melodic examples in call-and-response styles.
  • Create, through playing and writing, rhythmic variations of four-measure selections.
  •  Demonstrate musicianship and personal engagement.
  •  Sight-read music of varying styles and levels of difficulty.
  • Explore historical and cultural aspects of music.
  •  Analyze and evaluate music.
  •  Investigate aesthetic concepts related to music.

English

The Middle School English Language Arts curriculum is aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The course provides a balance of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language cumulative skills essential for success in the 21st Century. Students read and comprehend a variety of informational and literary texts. Students use a variety of strategies to plan, revise, and edit their writing as they work collaboratively and independently to produce texts. Students complete research projects, present their findings, and participate effectively in a range of conversations and collaborations with their peers. They apply knowledge of language conventions to correct errors, refine expression, and present their work effectively.

By the end of Grade 8, students are expected to:

  • Read, comprehend, and analyze literary nonfiction and literary texts, including stories, dramas, and poetry, with complexity and proficiently.
  • Make connections in narratives, poetry, and drama, ethically and artistically to other texts.
  • Write clear and coherent arguments, informative/explanatory, and narratives in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
  • Use technology, including the internet, to produce and publish writing and present the relationships between information and ideas efficiently as well as to interact and collaborate with others.
  • Conduct short research projects, drawing on several sources and generating additional related, focused questions that allow for multiple avenues of exploration.
  • Clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple- meaning words or phrases based on grade 8 reading and content phrases by using context clues.
  • Participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions and with diverse partners on grade 8 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.

 

Mathematics

During middle school, fractions are augmented by negative fractions to form the rational numbers. In Grade 8, students extend this system once more, augmenting the rational numbers with the irrational numbers to form the real numbers. Introduction to functions and equations take place. More understanding of geometric concepts and applications occur.

By the end of Grade 8, students are expected to:

  • Formulate and reason about expressions and equations, including modeling an association in bivariate data with a linear equation, and solving linear equations and systems of linear equations.
  • Grasp the concept of a function and using functions to describe quantitative relationships.
  • Analyze two- and three-dimensional space and figures using distance, angle, similarity, and congruence, and understanding and applying the Pythagorean Theorem.

 

Science

During grades six to eight, students begin to form deeper connections between concepts previously learned such as collecting evidence and drawing conclusions, understanding relationships between objects, and critical thinking that leads to designing effective solutions for problems. Students learn problem solving skills by asking questions and defining problems, analyzing and interpreting data and then designing and optimizing a model to develop possible solutions.

By the end of Grade 8, students are expected to:

  • Explain how the body is a system of interacting subsystems composed of groups of cells.
  • Apply Newton’s Third Law of Motion to relate forces when explaining the motion of objects. Plan an investigation to provide evidence that the change in an object’s motion depends on the sum of the forces on the object and the mass of the object.
  • Understand Earth’s place in the Universe, what makes up our solar system, and how can the motion of Earth explains seasons and eclipses.
  • Analyze and interpret data for patterns in the fossil record that document the existence, diversity, extinction, and change of life forms throughout the history of life on Earth under the assumption that natural laws operate today as in the past.
  • Construct an explanation based on evidence that describes how genetic variations of traits in a population increase some individuals’ probability of surviving and reproducing in a specific environment.

 

Social Studies

Students explore the historical development of people, places, and patterns of life from ancient times in terms of the impact on Western civilization.  They are engaged in historical thinking. They draw upon chronological thinking, historical comprehension, historical analysis and interpretation, historical research, and decision making. These skills are developed through the study of significant historical substance from the era or society being studied. During grade seven students use skills for historical and geographical analysis to explore the early history of the United States and understand ideas and events that strengthened the union. Students will also practice the intellectual skills required for responsible citizenship as they extend their understanding of the essential knowledge defined by all of the standards for history and social science. During grade eight, students study of the world’s peoples, places, and environments, with an emphasis on world regions.

By the end of Grade 8, students are expected to:

  • Analyze the characteristics of the Sub-Saharan African region.
  • Analyze the characteristics of the North African and Southwest Asian regions.
  • Apply social science skills to understand the ancient river valley civilizations, including those of Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Indus River Valley, and China and the civilizations of the Hebrews and Phoenicians.
  • Apply social science skills to understand Western Europe during the Middle Ages from about 500 to 1000 A.D. in terms of its impact on Western civilization.
  • Apply social science skills to understand the civilizations and empires of Africa, with emphasis on the African kingdoms of Axum and Zimbabwe and the West African civilizations of Ghana, Mali, and Songhai.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the political, cultural, geographic, and economic conditions in sub-Saharan Africa from about 1500 A.D. to about 1800 A.D.

 

Computer

Students use more advanced filters in MS-Excel such as conditional formatting and math functions. They enhance their critical thinking and solving problems through using logic functions and complex formulas. Students are introduced to advanced programs in digital art, MS- Publisher. During the final stage of middle school, students create a website and publish online. They also learn how to use an animated presentation program for presenting animated stories. Students learn an advanced coding program: MS-Small Basic.

By the end of Grade 8, students are expected to:

  • Learn programming using Small Basic to create simple programs and evaluate them
  • Create multiple types of animation, videos, and illustrations by using Explaindio
  • Learn the basics of creating websites for free by using Com.

 

French

In middle school, the French course is based on Virginia Standards for French language FIII aligned with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages DELF A1 junior.

In French III, students continue to develop their communicative and cultural competence by interacting orally and in writing with other speakers of French, understanding oral and written messages in the language, and making oral and written presentations in French. They communicate on a variety of topics at a level commensurate with their study, using more complex structures in the language and moving from concrete to more abstract concepts in a variety of time frames.

By the end of Grade 8, students are expected to:

  • Use level-appropriate vocabulary and structures to express ideas about topics and events found in a variety of authentic French language sources.
  • Understand culturally authentic, level-appropriate materials that present new information in familiar contexts.
  • Understand and respond appropriately to instruction presented in more complex informational materials.
  • Produce well-organized spoken and written presentations to suit the type of audience.
  • Participate in brief oral and written exchanges that reflect present, past, and future time frames.

 

German

In middle school, the German course is based on Virginia Standards for the German language aligned with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. Students continue to develop their communicative and cultural competence by interacting orally and in writing with other speakers of German, understanding oral and written messages in the language, and making oral and written presentations in German. They communicate on a variety of topics at a level commensurate with their study, using more complex structures in the language and moving from concrete to more abstract concepts in a variety of time frames.

By the end of Grade 8, the students are expected to:

  • Understand phrases and the highest frequency vocabulary related to areas of most immediate personal relevance.
  • Catch the main point in short, clear, simple messages and announcements.
  • Read very short, simple texts.
  • Find specific, predictable information in simple everyday material such as advertisements, prospectuses, menus and timetables and he can understand short simple personal letters.
  • Communicate using a simple and direct exchange of information on familiar topics and activities.
  • Use a series of phrases and sentences to describe in simple term.
  • Write short, simple notes and messages relating to matters in areas of immediate need.

 

Art

During middle school, students experience emphasis on exploration of studio processes. Using the elements of art (color, form, line, shape, space, texture, value) and the principles of design (balance, contrast, emphasis, movement, pattern, proportion, rhythm, unity, variety) as a framework, students investigate a variety of ideas for creating art. Through critical analysis and evaluation, students determine how artists convey meaning through the use of forms, media, and symbols.

By the end of Grade 8, students are expected to:

  • Plan for and reflect on the art-making process, using a sketchbook/journal.
  • Develop and use a process art portfolio as an idea-building resource to create works of art.
  • Refine personal works of art to improve quality of craftsmanship.
  • Synthesize prior knowledge and experience to create works of art.

 

Physical Education

Students in middle school ­apply fundamental skills and knowledge of anatomical structures and movement principles to build movement competence and confidence through acquisition, performance, and refinement of skills. Students use feedback to initiate and maintain practice to improve skill performance. Students assess their health-related fitness status and set reasonable and appropriate goals for development, maintenance, and improvement. Students explain the connection between energy balance and nutrition guidelines, meal planning, and heart rate. Students solve problems and make responsible decisions as they work together. They identify and seek opportunities to participate in regular physical activity at school and outside the school environment.

By the end of Grade 8, students are expected to:

  • Demonstrate and apply movement forms to a variety of cooperative and tactical activities that include dynamic and unpredictable situations with a focus on defensive strategies, to include reducing space, transitioning from offense to defense quickly, communicating with teammates, and selecting appropriate tactics to gain defensive advantage.
  • Create a rhythmic movement sequence to music as an individual or in a group.
  • Demonstrate skill-related components of fitness (agility, balance, coordination, power, reaction time, and speed) specific to a variety of activities.
  • Apply and demonstrate biomechanical principles of force, motion (laws of motion), rotation, and energy.
  • Describe the relationship between poor caloric intake and health risk factors.
  • Explain the role of energy balance in weight management and body composition

 

Music

During the Middle school years, students count, read, and perform music at Solo Literature Grade Levels 1 and 2 of the Virginia Band and Orchestra Directors Association (VBODA). Students focus on instrumental music.  Students begin receiving instruction on wind, percussion, or string instruments of their choice with guidance from the music teacher. Students demonstrate proper care of instruments and become familiar with the technology of the instrument. They demonstrate basic positions, fingerings, and tone production.  Students begin to describe, respond to, interpret, and evaluate works of music and create basic variations of simple melodies.

By the end of middle school students are expected to:

  • Demonstrate preparatory instrumental basics and playing procedures.
  •  Demonstrate proper instrumental techniques.
  • Demonstrate ensemble skills at a beginning level.
  •  Read and interpret standard music notation while performing music of varying styles and levels of difficulty.
  • Begin to use articulations, dynamic contrasts, and phrasing as means of expression.
  • Perform simple rhythmic and melodic examples in call-and-response styles.
  • Create, through playing and writing, rhythmic variations of four-measure selections.
  •  Demonstrate musicianship and personal engagement.
  •  Sight-read music of varying styles and levels of difficulty.
  • Explore historical and cultural aspects of music.
  •  Analyze and evaluate music.
  •  Investigate aesthetic concepts related to music.

MIDDLE SCHOOL GRADING

The school year is divided into two semesters. Each semester is divided into two terms. At the close of each term, students receive a report card indicating the grades earned in each class. Absences, if any, are recorded on their report card which reflects attendance. (Please Check our School Handbook for more information: Student Handbook)