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Early Years Academics

OUR PROGRAM OF STUDIES 

The curriculum provided to our Early Years students is woven into the projects and activities of the day. Social integration and the development of positive social skills is an integral part of our academic program. Our students learn to share and be supportive of each other while working together collaboratively on projects and classroom activities. They form strong friendships, their classmates and teachers becoming their family during the school hours. You can find our supply list for Early Years through this link. ( Early Years Supply list)

Our slogan in Kindergarten is “Learning through Play”. The early year’s classroom includes learning centres that offer instruction through various tools that ensure diverse students reach their learning goals. Students experience different strategies that address their individual needs.

Student data is collected every term to measure their achievement against the standards. A plan for each student is created to move to the next step on the journey of meeting the standards.

 

Literacy

Our school has been focusing on literacy as English is a second language for learners.

In Kindergarten planning is done with the end in mind:  Students develop from decoding to reading and writing.

By the end of the of the KG stage, students are expected to:

  • Learn the sound of each letter.
  • Read sight words.
  • Identify fiction and non-fiction texts.
  • Name characters, setting and plot in a story.
  • Write a short sentence using sight words and the correct punctuation to retell a story.
  • Answer questions about key details in a text.
  • Decode words to read from left to right.

 

Numeracy

By the end of the KG stage, students are expected to:

  • Count by ones 1-100.
  • Sort and categorize objects.
  • Compare objects according to size, weight and capacity.
  • Measure objects using standard and non-standard tools.
  • Add and subtract within 20.
  • Identify and describe 2-D and 3-D shapes.

 

Science

By the end of the KG stage, students are expected to:

  • Understand pulling and pushing forces.
  • Experiment on forces that affect speed like weight and direction.
  • Observe the impact of the weather on living organisms.
  • Appreciate how all living things need each other.
  • Practice how to save energy and how to generate it.

 

Social Studies

By the end of the KG stage, students are expected to:

  • Learn how to be a good citizen by being responsible in the classroom, at school, at home, in the community and in the world.
  • Differentiate between needs and wants.
  • Understand the basics of economics in the form of saving and spending money.
  • Appreciate work in the form of being a producer or a service.
  • Reading maps using colors and identifying Egypt and the continents.
  • Take care of the environment through recycling, reusing and reducing products to save the Earth from pollution.
  • Follow rules and staying safe.

 

Social Skills

We teach our students to be long-life learners. They are provoked to be critical thinkers and problem-solvers. Independence and collaboration is encouraged at this age. The diverse classroom community commits students to respect and appreciate personal differences.

 

French

This is an introductory course that provides students with basic communicative skills in French. Students develop the ability to communicate about themselves and the immediate environment using simple sentences containing basic language structures. The early years French course is based on Virginia Standards for French language (FI) aligned with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (DELF A1.1).

By the end of KG stage, students are expected to:

  • Gain confidence and know that they are capable of learning French.
  • Recognize French and identify words to use for communication.
  • Pronounce correctly French words studied in classrooms.
  • Follow simple instructions, such as classroom procedures or directions.

 

German

This is an introductory course that provides students with basic communicative skills in German. Students develop the ability to communicate about themselves and the immediate environment using simple sentences containing basic language structures. The early years German course is based on Virginia Standards for German language aligned with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

By the end of KG stage, students are expected to:

  • Gain confidence and know that they are capable of learning German.
  • Recognize German and identify words to use for communication.
  • Pronounce correctly German words studied in classrooms.
  • Follow simple instructions, such as classroom procedures or directions.

 

Art

Students enhance their cognitive, affective, sensory, and motor development, using a problem-solving approach. Students learn that art is a means for personal expression, has value, teaches about other times and places, and connects in important ways to other areas of learning. Students come to understand that their works of art are unique and valuable as forms of self-expression.

By the end of KG stage, students are expected to:

  • Create works of art that commemorate personal or community events.
  • Create works of art that connect to everyday life.
  • Create works of art that include the human figure as subject matter.
  • Describe the concept that people in all cultures create works of art.
  • Identify spatial relationships—left, right, top, bottom, side, center, front, back, over, and under.
  • Create drawings from observation.
  • Use motor skills (e.g., pinching, pulling, squeezing, twisting, pounding, rolling, folding, cutting, modeling, stamping) to create two-dimensional and three-dimensional works of art.
  • Select a preferred work of art and explain the preference.
  • Describe ideas, experiences, and feelings expressed in personal and other works of art.

 

Physical Education

Participating in a variety of movement experiences to develop fundamental movement patterns is the primary focus of the kindergarten physical education curriculum. Students at this level vary in maturity across all movement skills; they demonstrate continuous improvement in movement under very simple conditions. While developing fundamental skill patterns, students begin to learn key movement concepts that help them perform in a variety of educational games, dances, and gymnastics. They learn how their bodies react to vigorous physical activity. Students learn to use safe practices, cooperate with and respect others, and follow classroom rules. Experiences in physical education help them develop a positive attitude for leading a healthy, active lifestyle.

By the end of KG stage, students are expected to:

  • Explain that the body has muscles and bones that help the body move.
  • Demonstrate the concept of personal space.
  • Demonstrate approaching-mature form (at least two critical elements: which are small, isolated parts of the whole skill or movement) used in stationary manipulative skills for tossing and throwing underhand to targets, bounce and catch, toss and catch, kicking stationary ball to target, striking stationary object with paddle, dribbling, rolling ball underhand to target, trapping and volleying with hand.
  • Demonstrate a minimum of two critical elements used in manipulative skills while moving, to include dribbling with continuous kick (taps) of ball while walking.
  • Explain that physical activity helps the body grow.
  • Identify activities that can be done at home to keep the body healthy.
  • Identify physical activities that are done with family and with friends for fun
  • Demonstrate cooperative and safe play.
  • Demonstrate general and personal space.
  • Identify three classroom (procedural) rules.

 

Music

During the kindergarten years, students focus on basic musical concepts through singing, playing instruments, listening, and moving. Emphasis is placed on beginning to obtain musical knowledge, skills, and understanding as performers, composers, and listeners. Students investigate personal feelings and preferences evoked by musical experiences.

By the end of KG stage, students are expected to:

  • Read music, including high and low pitches and rhythms.
  • Investigate various uses of the voice.
  • Sing a variety of songs of limited range alone and with others.
  • Play a variety of pitched and nonpitched instruments alone and with others.
  • Perform rhythmic patterns.
  • Demonstrate a steady beat.
  • Respond to music with movement.
  • Explore historical and cultural aspects of music.
  • Participate in music activities.
  • Recognize the relationships between music and other fields of knowledge.
  • Express personal feelings evoked
  • Communicate personal response to expressive features of music.

English

During the early years, students with support and guidance focus on reading, writing, language, listening, and speaking. Students are exposed to a variety of genres in literature. They are expected to interact with printed material through writing for a variety of tasks, audiences and purposes.   Students collaborate with diverse partners and express themselves through writing, speaking, and listening.  Students use conventions of Standard English grammar when writing or speaking.

By the end of Grade 1, students are expected to:

  • Read, comprehend, interact, and discuss a variety of genres and informational texts including poetry, history/social studies and science texts.
  • Develop foundation skills in order to interact with print and read a variety of texts fluently and independently.
  • Know and apply phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words.
  • Write opinion, informative, explanatory and narrative texts to introduce a topic, supply details and facts, and sequence events.
  • Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about on grade level topics and texts with peers and adults in small and large groups by responding, answering questions, making comments, describing places, people, and events.
  • Use conventions of English grammar, punctuation, capitalization and usage when writing or speaking to determine meaning of unknown words, responding to a variety of texts, and understanding word relationships at a grade one level.

 

Mathematics

During the early Elementary years, students with support and guidance will focus on developing understanding of addition, subtraction, and strategies for addition and subtraction within 20.  They develop an understanding of whole number relationships and place value, including grouping in tens and ones. In addition, they develop understanding of linear measurement and measuring lengths as iterating length units. Students reason about attributes, composing and decomposing geometric shapes.

By the end of Grade 1, students are expected to:

  • Develop strategies for adding and subtracting whole numbers using a variety of models, understand connections between counting and addition and subtraction to solve addition and subtraction problems.
  • Develop, discuss, and use efficient and accurate methods to add, develop an understanding of place value, and compare whole numbers through activities that build number sense.
  • Develop an understanding of measurement, ordering objects, telling time, and representing/interpreting data at a first-grade level.
  • Distinguish attributes of geometric shapes, compose, decompose, and partition   geometric shapes or solid figures and build understanding of part-whole.

 

Science

Students in first grade and second grade begin to develop an understanding of core ideas in physical sciences, life sciences, earth sciences, space sciences, engineering, technology, and applications of science. Students learn about structure, function and information processing, and space systems. They study the patterns, cycles and waves of light and sound. They learn literacy through science.

By the end of Grade 1, students are expected to:

  • Develop understanding of the relationship between sound and vibrating materials as well as between the availability of light and ability to see objects.
  • Develop understanding of how plants and animals use their external parts to help them survive, grow, and meet their needs as well as how behaviors of parents and offspring help the offspring survive.
  • Observe, describe, and predict patterns of the movement of objects in the sky.
  • Ask questions, make observations, and gather information about a situation people want to change to define a simple problem that can be solved through the development of a new or improved object or tool.
  • Develop a simple sketch, drawing, or physical model to illustrate how the shape of an object helps it function as needed to solve a given problem. Analyze data from tests of two objects designed to solve the same problem to compare the strengths and weaknesses of how each performs
  • Demonstrate grade-appropriate proficiency in planning and carrying out investigations, analyzing and interpreting data, constructing explanations and designing solutions, and obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information. Students are expected to use these practices to demonstrate understanding of the core ideas

 

Social Studies

The standards for first and second grade Social Studies   include an introduction to citizenship while learning about historical leaders.  Students will be introduced to basic map skills, goods and services, consumers and producers, and making economic choices. They will learn that communities include people who have diverse ethnic origins, customs, and traditions who are united   by common principles, laws and customs.

By the end of Grade 1, students are expected to:

  • Describe important events and influential people in the history.
  • Develop map skills by recognizing basic map symbols, using cardinal directions, locating places on a map, construct simple maps, and identify landforms.
  • Explain the difference between goods and services and consumers and producers.
  • Discuss characteristics of good citizens, traditions, and elections.

 

Computer

Students in grades one and two learn about computer software and hardware. They enhance their digital art skills by using different programs such as painting through Kidpix and Paint Brush. The curriculum is integrated with other subjects such as math. Students learn the skill of typing using MS-Word. Students are introduced to the basic features of Microsoft Windows Operating System.

By the end of Grade 1, students are expected to:

  • Recognize computer parts and their usage (Monitor, Keyboard, CPU, and Mouse).
  • Learn how to use the Kidpix program which includes program tools to select background, paint, and use a pencil tool to draw shapes and a text tool to write.
  • Learn how to turn the computer on and off.
  • Learn how to use paint program shapes to make a picture and how to fill shapes with color.

 

French

This is an introductory course that provides students with basic communicative skills in French. Students develop the ability to communicate about themselves and the immediate environment using simple sentences containing basic language structures. The early years French course is based on Virginia Standards for French language (FI) aligned with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (DELF A1.1).

By the end of Grade 1, students are expected to:

  • Use basic greetings, farewells, and expressions of courtesy both orally and in writing.
  • Use proper formal and informal forms of address in familiar situations.
  • Follow simple instructions, such as classroom procedures or directions.
  • Begin to express their opinion in French.

 

German

This is an introductory course that provides students with basic communicative skills in German. Students develop the ability to communicate about themselves and the immediate environment using simple sentences containing basic language structures. The early years German course is based on Virginia Standards for German language aligned with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

By the end of Grade 1, students are expected to:

  • Understand familiar names, words and very simple sentences.
  • Use simple phrases and sentences to describe where they live and people they know.
  • Recognize familiar words and very basic and phrases concerning themselves, their families.

 

Art

Students enhance their cognitive, affective, sensory, and motor development, using a problem-solving approach. Students learn that art is a means for personal expression, has value, teaches about other times and places, and connects in important ways to other areas of learning. Students come to understand that their works of art are unique and valuable as forms of self-expression.

By the end of Grade 1, students are expected to:

  • Use the senses of sight, touch, and hearing as inspirations for works of art.
  • Create works of art inspired by stories or poems, ideas, and themes.
  • Create art from real and imaginary sources of inspiration
  • Describe steps used in the creation of works of art.

 

Physical Education

Participating in a variety of movement experiences to develop fundamental movement patterns is the primary focus of the kindergarten physical education curriculum. Students at this level vary in maturity across all movement skills; they demonstrate continuous improvement in movement under very simple conditions. While developing fundamental skill patterns, students begin to learn key movement concepts that help them perform in a variety of educational games, dances, and gymnastics. They learn how their bodies react to vigorous physical activity. Students learn to use safe practices, cooperate with and respect others, and follow classroom rules. Experiences in physical education help them develop a positive attitude for leading a healthy, active lifestyle.

By the end of Grade 1, students are expected to:

  • Identify activities to do at home to help the body move and grow.
  • Identify one activity that increases heart and breathing rates to make the heart stronger.
  • Describe and demonstrate activity at two or more intensity levels.
  • Demonstrate simple educational gymnastic skills, to include balancing at different levels, two different rolls (narrow or curled), moving in two different directions, and transfer of weight.
  • Demonstrate moving to a beat or rhythmic pattern in personal (self-space) and general space.
  • Perform a teacher-led dance.
  • Demonstrate forward, sideways, backwards (slow), and side-to-side directions.
  • Demonstrate low, medium, and high levels.
  • Explain that choosing nutritious foods and being physically active are components of being healthy.

 

Music

During the kindergarten years, students focus on basic musical concepts through singing, playing instruments, listening, and moving. Emphasis is placed on beginning to obtain musical knowledge, skills, and understanding as performers, composers, and listeners. Students investigate personal feelings and preferences evoked by musical experiences.

By the end of Early Years, students are expected to:

  • Read music, including high and low pitches and rhythms.
  • Investigate various uses of the voice.
  • Sing a variety of songs of limited range alone and with others.
  • Play a variety of pitched and nonpitched instruments alone and with others.
  • Perform rhythmic patterns.
  • Demonstrate a steady beat.
  • Respond to music with movement.
  • Explore historical and cultural aspects of music.
  • Participate in music activities.
  • Recognize the relationships between music and other fields of knowledge.
  • Express personal feelings evoked
  • Communicate personal response to expressive features of music.

English

During the early years, students with support and guidance focus on reading, writing, language, listening, and speaking. Students are exposed to a variety of genres in literature. They are expected to interact with printed material through writing for a variety of tasks, audiences and purposes.   Students collaborate with diverse partners and express themselves through writing, speaking, and listening.  Students use conventions of Standard English grammar when writing or speaking.

By the end of Grade 2, students are expected to:

  • Independently, read, comprehend, interact, and discuss a variety of genres and informational texts including fables, folktales, poetry, history/social studies and science texts proficiently, with scaffolding at the high-end range.
  • Develop foundation skills in order to interact with print, and read grade level text orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression independently and with guidance.
  • Know and apply second grade level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words.
  • Write opinion, informative/explanatory texts and narratives to introduce a topic, supply details/facts, recount, and sequence events.
  • Engage in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade 2 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and large groups by responding, recounting, answering questions, making comments, describing places, people, and events.
  • Use conventions of English grammar, punctuation, capitalization and usage when writing or speaking to determine meaning of unknown words, responding to a variety of texts, and understanding word relationships at a grade two level.

 

Mathematics

During the early Elementary years, students with support and guidance will focus on developing understanding of addition, subtraction, and strategies for addition and subtraction within 20.  They develop an understanding of whole number relationships and place value, including grouping in tens and ones. In addition, they develop understanding of linear measurement and measuring lengths as iterating length units. Students reason about attributes, composing and decomposing geometric shapes.

By the end of Grade 2, students are expected to:

  • Extend their understanding of the base-ten system by counting in fives, tens, and multiples of hundreds, tens, and ones, by comparing numbers and determining place value.
  • Develop fluency with addition and subtraction at a second-grade level.
  • Compute sums and differences of whole numbers in base-ten notation, using place value and the properties of operations.
  • Use rulers and other measurement tools with the understanding that linear measure involves an iteration of units.
  • Investigate attributes, describe, analyze shapes to decompose and combine shapes to develop a foundation for understanding area, volume, congruence, similarity, and symmetry in later grades.

 

Science

Students in first grade and second grade begin to develop an understanding of core ideas in physical sciences, life sciences, earth sciences, space sciences, engineering, technology, and applications of science. Students learn about structure, function and information processing, and space systems. They study the patterns, cycles and waves of light and sound. They learn literacy through science.

By the end of Grade 2, students are expected to:

  • Develop an understanding of what plants need to grow and how plants depend on animals for seed dispersal and pollination.
  • Compare the diversity of life in different habitats. An understanding of observable properties of materials is developed by students at this level through analysis and classification of different materials.
  • Apply their understanding of the idea that wind and water can change the shape of the land to compare design solutions to slow or prevent such change.
  • Use information and models to identify and represent the shapes and kinds of land and bodies of water in an area and where water is found on Earth.
  • Demonstrate grade appropriate proficiency in developing and using models, planning and carrying out investigations, analyzing and interpreting data, constructing explanations and designing solutions, engaging in argument from evidence, and obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information.

 

Social Studies

The standards for first and second grade Social Studies   include an introduction to citizenship while learning about historical leaders.  Students will be introduced to basic map skills, goods and services, consumers and producers, and making economic choices. They will learn that communities include people who have diverse ethnic origins, customs, and traditions who are united   by common principles, laws and customs.

By the end of Grade 2, students are expected to:

  • Demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship
  • Describe important developments and innovations in United States history, including developments and innovations related to communication and transportation.
  • Develop map skills by using globes and maps to locate and describe relationship between the environment and culture.
  • Describe natural resources human resources and capital resources and distinguish between the use of barter and the use of money in the exchange for goods and services.
  • Explain the responsibilities of a good citizens and their symbols, traditions, and their contribution to communities past and present.

 

Computer

Students in grades one and two learn about computer software and hardware. They enhance their digital art skills by using different programs such as painting through Kidpix and Paint Brush. The curriculum is integrated with other subjects such as math. Students learn the skill of typing using MS-Word. Students are introduced to the basic features of Microsoft Windows Operating System.

By the end of Grade 2, students are expected to:

  • Recognize computer components.
  • Adjust the desktop screen.
  • Add word art in Microsoft Word and change styles and colors.
  • Draw in paint with different types of brushes and use the magnifier.

 

French

This is an introductory course that provides students with basic communicative skills in French. Students develop the ability to communicate about themselves and the immediate environment using simple sentences containing basic language structures. The early years French course is based on Virginia Standards for French language (FI) aligned with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (DELF A1.1).

By the end of Grade 2, students are expected to:

  • Answer comprehension questions dealing with very short recordings about everyday situations.
  • Answer comprehension questions dealing with easy written texts dealing with everyday situations.
  • Write personal information, simple messages and short stories.
  • Talk about themselves, express their tastes, and complete a simple description.

 

German

This is an introductory course that provides students with basic communicative skills in German. Students develop the ability to communicate about themselves and the immediate environment using simple sentences containing basic language structures. The early years German course is based on Virginia Standards for German language aligned with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

By the end of Grade 2, students are expected to:

  • Interact in a simple way provided the other person is prepared to repeat or rephrase things at a slower rate of speech and help themselves formulate what they are  trying to say.
  • Ask and answer simple questions in areas of immediate need or on very familiar topics.
  • Write personal information, simple messages and short stories.

 

Art

Students enhance their cognitive, affective, sensory, and motor development, using a problem-solving approach. Students learn that art is a means for personal expression, has value, teaches about other times and places, and connects in important ways to other areas of learning. Students come to understand that their works of art are unique and valuable as forms of self-expression.

By the end of Grade 2, students are expected to:

  • Use foreground and background in works of art.
  • Depict objects according to size and proportion within works of art.
  • Use observational drawing in preparation for creating works of art.
  • Create works of art from observation.
  • Create three-dimensional works of art, using a variety of materials to include clay.

 

Physical Education

Participating in a variety of movement experiences to develop fundamental movement patterns is the primary focus of the kindergarten physical education curriculum. Students at this level vary in maturity across all movement skills; they demonstrate continuous improvement in movement under very simple conditions. While developing fundamental skill patterns, students begin to learn key movement concepts that help them perform in a variety of educational games, dances, and gymnastics. They learn how their bodies react to vigorous physical activity. Students learn to use safe practices, cooperate with and respect others, and follow classroom rules. Experiences in physical education help them develop a positive attitude for leading a healthy, active lifestyle.

By the end of Grade 2, students are expected to:

  • Demonstrate individually and with a partner the mature forms of manipulative skills for underhand throwing, catching underhand tossed or thrown ball, kicking/passing stationary ball to a partner or to a target, foot dribble with control while walking, striking, consecutive upward volleying with hand(s), and stationary hand dribbling.
  • Demonstrate a simple educational gymnastic sequence, including balance, roll, transfer of weight from feet to hands, and flight.
  • Demonstrate moving to a rhythm by performing basic dance sequences (teacher- or student-led dances).
  • Demonstrate mature form for hop, jump, leap, skip, run, jog, gallop, and slide.
  • Identify examples of healthy snacks.
  • Identify different hydration choices.
  • Explain that choosing nutritious foods and being physically active are components of being healthy.

 

Music

During the kindergarten years, students focus on basic musical concepts through singing, playing instruments, listening, and moving. Emphasis is placed on beginning to obtain musical knowledge, skills, and understanding as performers, composers, and listeners. Students investigate personal feelings and preferences evoked by musical experiences.

By the end of Early Years, students are expected to:

  • Read music, including high and low pitches and rhythms.
  • Investigate various uses of the voice.
  • Sing a variety of songs of limited range alone and with others.
  • Play a variety of pitched and nonpitched instruments alone and with others.
  • Perform rhythmic patterns.
  • Demonstrate a steady beat.
  • Respond to music with movement.
  • Explore historical and cultural aspects of music.
  • Participate in music activities.
  • Recognize the relationships between music and other fields of knowledge.
  • Express personal feelings evoked
  • Communicate personal response to expressive features of music.

Our slogan in Kindergarten is “Learning through Play”. The early year’s classroom includes learning centres that offer instruction through various tools that ensure diverse students reach their learning goals. Students experience different strategies that address their individual needs.

Student data is collected every term to measure their achievement against the standards. A plan for each student is created to move to the next step on the journey of meeting the standards.

 

Literacy

Our school has been focusing on literacy as English is a second language for learners.

In Kindergarten planning is done with the end in mind:  Students develop from decoding to reading and writing.

By the end of the of the KG stage, students are expected to:

  • Learn the sound of each letter.
  • Read sight words.
  • Identify fiction and non-fiction texts.
  • Name characters, setting and plot in a story.
  • Write a short sentence using sight words and the correct punctuation to retell a story.
  • Answer questions about key details in a text.
  • Decode words to read from left to right.

 

Numeracy

By the end of the KG stage, students are expected to:

  • Count by ones 1-100.
  • Sort and categorize objects.
  • Compare objects according to size, weight and capacity.
  • Measure objects using standard and non-standard tools.
  • Add and subtract within 20.
  • Identify and describe 2-D and 3-D shapes.

 

Science

By the end of the KG stage, students are expected to:

  • Understand pulling and pushing forces.
  • Experiment on forces that affect speed like weight and direction.
  • Observe the impact of the weather on living organisms.
  • Appreciate how all living things need each other.
  • Practice how to save energy and how to generate it.

 

Social Studies

By the end of the KG stage, students are expected to:

  • Learn how to be a good citizen by being responsible in the classroom, at school, at home, in the community and in the world.
  • Differentiate between needs and wants.
  • Understand the basics of economics in the form of saving and spending money.
  • Appreciate work in the form of being a producer or a service.
  • Reading maps using colors and identifying Egypt and the continents.
  • Take care of the environment through recycling, reusing and reducing products to save the Earth from pollution.
  • Follow rules and staying safe.

 

Social Skills

We teach our students to be long-life learners. They are provoked to be critical thinkers and problem-solvers. Independence and collaboration is encouraged at this age. The diverse classroom community commits students to respect and appreciate personal differences.

 

French

This is an introductory course that provides students with basic communicative skills in French. Students develop the ability to communicate about themselves and the immediate environment using simple sentences containing basic language structures. The early years French course is based on Virginia Standards for French language (FI) aligned with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (DELF A1.1).

By the end of KG stage, students are expected to:

  • Gain confidence and know that they are capable of learning French.
  • Recognize French and identify words to use for communication.
  • Pronounce correctly French words studied in classrooms.
  • Follow simple instructions, such as classroom procedures or directions.

 

German

This is an introductory course that provides students with basic communicative skills in German. Students develop the ability to communicate about themselves and the immediate environment using simple sentences containing basic language structures. The early years German course is based on Virginia Standards for German language aligned with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

By the end of KG stage, students are expected to:

  • Gain confidence and know that they are capable of learning German.
  • Recognize German and identify words to use for communication.
  • Pronounce correctly German words studied in classrooms.
  • Follow simple instructions, such as classroom procedures or directions.

 

Art

Students enhance their cognitive, affective, sensory, and motor development, using a problem-solving approach. Students learn that art is a means for personal expression, has value, teaches about other times and places, and connects in important ways to other areas of learning. Students come to understand that their works of art are unique and valuable as forms of self-expression.

By the end of KG stage, students are expected to:

  • Create works of art that commemorate personal or community events.
  • Create works of art that connect to everyday life.
  • Create works of art that include the human figure as subject matter.
  • Describe the concept that people in all cultures create works of art.
  • Identify spatial relationships—left, right, top, bottom, side, center, front, back, over, and under.
  • Create drawings from observation.
  • Use motor skills (e.g., pinching, pulling, squeezing, twisting, pounding, rolling, folding, cutting, modeling, stamping) to create two-dimensional and three-dimensional works of art.
  • Select a preferred work of art and explain the preference.
  • Describe ideas, experiences, and feelings expressed in personal and other works of art.

 

Physical Education

Participating in a variety of movement experiences to develop fundamental movement patterns is the primary focus of the kindergarten physical education curriculum. Students at this level vary in maturity across all movement skills; they demonstrate continuous improvement in movement under very simple conditions. While developing fundamental skill patterns, students begin to learn key movement concepts that help them perform in a variety of educational games, dances, and gymnastics. They learn how their bodies react to vigorous physical activity. Students learn to use safe practices, cooperate with and respect others, and follow classroom rules. Experiences in physical education help them develop a positive attitude for leading a healthy, active lifestyle.

By the end of KG stage, students are expected to:

  • Explain that the body has muscles and bones that help the body move.
  • Demonstrate the concept of personal space.
  • Demonstrate approaching-mature form (at least two critical elements: which are small, isolated parts of the whole skill or movement) used in stationary manipulative skills for tossing and throwing underhand to targets, bounce and catch, toss and catch, kicking stationary ball to target, striking stationary object with paddle, dribbling, rolling ball underhand to target, trapping and volleying with hand.
  • Demonstrate a minimum of two critical elements used in manipulative skills while moving, to include dribbling with continuous kick (taps) of ball while walking.
  • Explain that physical activity helps the body grow.
  • Identify activities that can be done at home to keep the body healthy.
  • Identify physical activities that are done with family and with friends for fun
  • Demonstrate cooperative and safe play.
  • Demonstrate general and personal space.
  • Identify three classroom (procedural) rules.

 

Music

During the kindergarten years, students focus on basic musical concepts through singing, playing instruments, listening, and moving. Emphasis is placed on beginning to obtain musical knowledge, skills, and understanding as performers, composers, and listeners. Students investigate personal feelings and preferences evoked by musical experiences.

By the end of KG stage, students are expected to:

  • Read music, including high and low pitches and rhythms.
  • Investigate various uses of the voice.
  • Sing a variety of songs of limited range alone and with others.
  • Play a variety of pitched and nonpitched instruments alone and with others.
  • Perform rhythmic patterns.
  • Demonstrate a steady beat.
  • Respond to music with movement.
  • Explore historical and cultural aspects of music.
  • Participate in music activities.
  • Recognize the relationships between music and other fields of knowledge.
  • Express personal feelings evoked
  • Communicate personal response to expressive features of music.

English

During the early years, students with support and guidance focus on reading, writing, language, listening, and speaking. Students are exposed to a variety of genres in literature. They are expected to interact with printed material through writing for a variety of tasks, audiences and purposes.   Students collaborate with diverse partners and express themselves through writing, speaking, and listening.  Students use conventions of Standard English grammar when writing or speaking.

By the end of Grade 1, students are expected to:

  • Read, comprehend, interact, and discuss a variety of genres and informational texts including poetry, history/social studies and science texts.
  • Develop foundation skills in order to interact with print and read a variety of texts fluently and independently.
  • Know and apply phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words.
  • Write opinion, informative, explanatory and narrative texts to introduce a topic, supply details and facts, and sequence events.
  • Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about on grade level topics and texts with peers and adults in small and large groups by responding, answering questions, making comments, describing places, people, and events.
  • Use conventions of English grammar, punctuation, capitalization and usage when writing or speaking to determine meaning of unknown words, responding to a variety of texts, and understanding word relationships at a grade one level.

 

Mathematics

During the early Elementary years, students with support and guidance will focus on developing understanding of addition, subtraction, and strategies for addition and subtraction within 20.  They develop an understanding of whole number relationships and place value, including grouping in tens and ones. In addition, they develop understanding of linear measurement and measuring lengths as iterating length units. Students reason about attributes, composing and decomposing geometric shapes.

By the end of Grade 1, students are expected to:

  • Develop strategies for adding and subtracting whole numbers using a variety of models, understand connections between counting and addition and subtraction to solve addition and subtraction problems.
  • Develop, discuss, and use efficient and accurate methods to add, develop an understanding of place value, and compare whole numbers through activities that build number sense.
  • Develop an understanding of measurement, ordering objects, telling time, and representing/interpreting data at a first-grade level.
  • Distinguish attributes of geometric shapes, compose, decompose, and partition   geometric shapes or solid figures and build understanding of part-whole.

 

Science

Students in first grade and second grade begin to develop an understanding of core ideas in physical sciences, life sciences, earth sciences, space sciences, engineering, technology, and applications of science. Students learn about structure, function and information processing, and space systems. They study the patterns, cycles and waves of light and sound. They learn literacy through science.

By the end of Grade 1, students are expected to:

  • Develop understanding of the relationship between sound and vibrating materials as well as between the availability of light and ability to see objects.
  • Develop understanding of how plants and animals use their external parts to help them survive, grow, and meet their needs as well as how behaviors of parents and offspring help the offspring survive.
  • Observe, describe, and predict patterns of the movement of objects in the sky.
  • Ask questions, make observations, and gather information about a situation people want to change to define a simple problem that can be solved through the development of a new or improved object or tool.
  • Develop a simple sketch, drawing, or physical model to illustrate how the shape of an object helps it function as needed to solve a given problem. Analyze data from tests of two objects designed to solve the same problem to compare the strengths and weaknesses of how each performs
  • Demonstrate grade-appropriate proficiency in planning and carrying out investigations, analyzing and interpreting data, constructing explanations and designing solutions, and obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information. Students are expected to use these practices to demonstrate understanding of the core ideas

 

Social Studies

The standards for first and second grade Social Studies   include an introduction to citizenship while learning about historical leaders.  Students will be introduced to basic map skills, goods and services, consumers and producers, and making economic choices. They will learn that communities include people who have diverse ethnic origins, customs, and traditions who are united   by common principles, laws and customs.

By the end of Grade 1, students are expected to:

  • Describe important events and influential people in the history.
  • Develop map skills by recognizing basic map symbols, using cardinal directions, locating places on a map, construct simple maps, and identify landforms.
  • Explain the difference between goods and services and consumers and producers.
  • Discuss characteristics of good citizens, traditions, and elections.

 

Computer

Students in grades one and two learn about computer software and hardware. They enhance their digital art skills by using different programs such as painting through Kidpix and Paint Brush. The curriculum is integrated with other subjects such as math. Students learn the skill of typing using MS-Word. Students are introduced to the basic features of Microsoft Windows Operating System.

By the end of Grade 1, students are expected to:

  • Recognize computer parts and their usage (Monitor, Keyboard, CPU, and Mouse).
  • Learn how to use the Kidpix program which includes program tools to select background, paint, and use a pencil tool to draw shapes and a text tool to write.
  • Learn how to turn the computer on and off.
  • Learn how to use paint program shapes to make a picture and how to fill shapes with color.

 

French

This is an introductory course that provides students with basic communicative skills in French. Students develop the ability to communicate about themselves and the immediate environment using simple sentences containing basic language structures. The early years French course is based on Virginia Standards for French language (FI) aligned with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (DELF A1.1).

By the end of Grade 1, students are expected to:

  • Use basic greetings, farewells, and expressions of courtesy both orally and in writing.
  • Use proper formal and informal forms of address in familiar situations.
  • Follow simple instructions, such as classroom procedures or directions.
  • Begin to express their opinion in French.

 

German

This is an introductory course that provides students with basic communicative skills in German. Students develop the ability to communicate about themselves and the immediate environment using simple sentences containing basic language structures. The early years German course is based on Virginia Standards for German language aligned with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

By the end of Grade 1, students are expected to:

  • Understand familiar names, words and very simple sentences.
  • Use simple phrases and sentences to describe where they live and people they know.
  • Recognize familiar words and very basic and phrases concerning themselves, their families.

 

Art

Students enhance their cognitive, affective, sensory, and motor development, using a problem-solving approach. Students learn that art is a means for personal expression, has value, teaches about other times and places, and connects in important ways to other areas of learning. Students come to understand that their works of art are unique and valuable as forms of self-expression.

By the end of Grade 1, students are expected to:

  • Use the senses of sight, touch, and hearing as inspirations for works of art.
  • Create works of art inspired by stories or poems, ideas, and themes.
  • Create art from real and imaginary sources of inspiration
  • Describe steps used in the creation of works of art.

 

Physical Education

Participating in a variety of movement experiences to develop fundamental movement patterns is the primary focus of the kindergarten physical education curriculum. Students at this level vary in maturity across all movement skills; they demonstrate continuous improvement in movement under very simple conditions. While developing fundamental skill patterns, students begin to learn key movement concepts that help them perform in a variety of educational games, dances, and gymnastics. They learn how their bodies react to vigorous physical activity. Students learn to use safe practices, cooperate with and respect others, and follow classroom rules. Experiences in physical education help them develop a positive attitude for leading a healthy, active lifestyle.

By the end of Grade 1, students are expected to:

  • Identify activities to do at home to help the body move and grow.
  • Identify one activity that increases heart and breathing rates to make the heart stronger.
  • Describe and demonstrate activity at two or more intensity levels.
  • Demonstrate simple educational gymnastic skills, to include balancing at different levels, two different rolls (narrow or curled), moving in two different directions, and transfer of weight.
  • Demonstrate moving to a beat or rhythmic pattern in personal (self-space) and general space.
  • Perform a teacher-led dance.
  • Demonstrate forward, sideways, backwards (slow), and side-to-side directions.
  • Demonstrate low, medium, and high levels.
  • Explain that choosing nutritious foods and being physically active are components of being healthy.

 

Music

During the kindergarten years, students focus on basic musical concepts through singing, playing instruments, listening, and moving. Emphasis is placed on beginning to obtain musical knowledge, skills, and understanding as performers, composers, and listeners. Students investigate personal feelings and preferences evoked by musical experiences.

By the end of Early Years, students are expected to:

  • Read music, including high and low pitches and rhythms.
  • Investigate various uses of the voice.
  • Sing a variety of songs of limited range alone and with others.
  • Play a variety of pitched and nonpitched instruments alone and with others.
  • Perform rhythmic patterns.
  • Demonstrate a steady beat.
  • Respond to music with movement.
  • Explore historical and cultural aspects of music.
  • Participate in music activities.
  • Recognize the relationships between music and other fields of knowledge.
  • Express personal feelings evoked
  • Communicate personal response to expressive features of music.

English

During the early years, students with support and guidance focus on reading, writing, language, listening, and speaking. Students are exposed to a variety of genres in literature. They are expected to interact with printed material through writing for a variety of tasks, audiences and purposes.   Students collaborate with diverse partners and express themselves through writing, speaking, and listening.  Students use conventions of Standard English grammar when writing or speaking.

By the end of Grade 2, students are expected to:

  • Independently, read, comprehend, interact, and discuss a variety of genres and informational texts including fables, folktales, poetry, history/social studies and science texts proficiently, with scaffolding at the high-end range.
  • Develop foundation skills in order to interact with print, and read grade level text orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression independently and with guidance.
  • Know and apply second grade level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words.
  • Write opinion, informative/explanatory texts and narratives to introduce a topic, supply details/facts, recount, and sequence events.
  • Engage in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade 2 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and large groups by responding, recounting, answering questions, making comments, describing places, people, and events.
  • Use conventions of English grammar, punctuation, capitalization and usage when writing or speaking to determine meaning of unknown words, responding to a variety of texts, and understanding word relationships at a grade two level.

 

Mathematics

During the early Elementary years, students with support and guidance will focus on developing understanding of addition, subtraction, and strategies for addition and subtraction within 20.  They develop an understanding of whole number relationships and place value, including grouping in tens and ones. In addition, they develop understanding of linear measurement and measuring lengths as iterating length units. Students reason about attributes, composing and decomposing geometric shapes.

By the end of Grade 2, students are expected to:

  • Extend their understanding of the base-ten system by counting in fives, tens, and multiples of hundreds, tens, and ones, by comparing numbers and determining place value.
  • Develop fluency with addition and subtraction at a second-grade level.
  • Compute sums and differences of whole numbers in base-ten notation, using place value and the properties of operations.
  • Use rulers and other measurement tools with the understanding that linear measure involves an iteration of units.
  • Investigate attributes, describe, analyze shapes to decompose and combine shapes to develop a foundation for understanding area, volume, congruence, similarity, and symmetry in later grades.

 

Science

Students in first grade and second grade begin to develop an understanding of core ideas in physical sciences, life sciences, earth sciences, space sciences, engineering, technology, and applications of science. Students learn about structure, function and information processing, and space systems. They study the patterns, cycles and waves of light and sound. They learn literacy through science.

By the end of Grade 2, students are expected to:

  • Develop an understanding of what plants need to grow and how plants depend on animals for seed dispersal and pollination.
  • Compare the diversity of life in different habitats. An understanding of observable properties of materials is developed by students at this level through analysis and classification of different materials.
  • Apply their understanding of the idea that wind and water can change the shape of the land to compare design solutions to slow or prevent such change.
  • Use information and models to identify and represent the shapes and kinds of land and bodies of water in an area and where water is found on Earth.
  • Demonstrate grade appropriate proficiency in developing and using models, planning and carrying out investigations, analyzing and interpreting data, constructing explanations and designing solutions, engaging in argument from evidence, and obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information.

 

Social Studies

The standards for first and second grade Social Studies   include an introduction to citizenship while learning about historical leaders.  Students will be introduced to basic map skills, goods and services, consumers and producers, and making economic choices. They will learn that communities include people who have diverse ethnic origins, customs, and traditions who are united   by common principles, laws and customs.

By the end of Grade 2, students are expected to:

  • Demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship
  • Describe important developments and innovations in United States history, including developments and innovations related to communication and transportation.
  • Develop map skills by using globes and maps to locate and describe relationship between the environment and culture.
  • Describe natural resources human resources and capital resources and distinguish between the use of barter and the use of money in the exchange for goods and services.
  • Explain the responsibilities of a good citizens and their symbols, traditions, and their contribution to communities past and present.

 

Computer

Students in grades one and two learn about computer software and hardware. They enhance their digital art skills by using different programs such as painting through Kidpix and Paint Brush. The curriculum is integrated with other subjects such as math. Students learn the skill of typing using MS-Word. Students are introduced to the basic features of Microsoft Windows Operating System.

By the end of Grade 2, students are expected to:

  • Recognize computer components.
  • Adjust the desktop screen.
  • Add word art in Microsoft Word and change styles and colors.
  • Draw in paint with different types of brushes and use the magnifier.

 

French

This is an introductory course that provides students with basic communicative skills in French. Students develop the ability to communicate about themselves and the immediate environment using simple sentences containing basic language structures. The early years French course is based on Virginia Standards for French language (FI) aligned with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (DELF A1.1).

By the end of Grade 2, students are expected to:

  • Answer comprehension questions dealing with very short recordings about everyday situations.
  • Answer comprehension questions dealing with easy written texts dealing with everyday situations.
  • Write personal information, simple messages and short stories.
  • Talk about themselves, express their tastes, and complete a simple description.

 

German

This is an introductory course that provides students with basic communicative skills in German. Students develop the ability to communicate about themselves and the immediate environment using simple sentences containing basic language structures. The early years German course is based on Virginia Standards for German language aligned with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

By the end of Grade 2, students are expected to:

  • Interact in a simple way provided the other person is prepared to repeat or rephrase things at a slower rate of speech and help themselves formulate what they are  trying to say.
  • Ask and answer simple questions in areas of immediate need or on very familiar topics.
  • Write personal information, simple messages and short stories.

 

Art

Students enhance their cognitive, affective, sensory, and motor development, using a problem-solving approach. Students learn that art is a means for personal expression, has value, teaches about other times and places, and connects in important ways to other areas of learning. Students come to understand that their works of art are unique and valuable as forms of self-expression.

By the end of Grade 2, students are expected to:

  • Use foreground and background in works of art.
  • Depict objects according to size and proportion within works of art.
  • Use observational drawing in preparation for creating works of art.
  • Create works of art from observation.
  • Create three-dimensional works of art, using a variety of materials to include clay.

 

Physical Education

Participating in a variety of movement experiences to develop fundamental movement patterns is the primary focus of the kindergarten physical education curriculum. Students at this level vary in maturity across all movement skills; they demonstrate continuous improvement in movement under very simple conditions. While developing fundamental skill patterns, students begin to learn key movement concepts that help them perform in a variety of educational games, dances, and gymnastics. They learn how their bodies react to vigorous physical activity. Students learn to use safe practices, cooperate with and respect others, and follow classroom rules. Experiences in physical education help them develop a positive attitude for leading a healthy, active lifestyle.

By the end of Grade 2, students are expected to:

  • Demonstrate individually and with a partner the mature forms of manipulative skills for underhand throwing, catching underhand tossed or thrown ball, kicking/passing stationary ball to a partner or to a target, foot dribble with control while walking, striking, consecutive upward volleying with hand(s), and stationary hand dribbling.
  • Demonstrate a simple educational gymnastic sequence, including balance, roll, transfer of weight from feet to hands, and flight.
  • Demonstrate moving to a rhythm by performing basic dance sequences (teacher- or student-led dances).
  • Demonstrate mature form for hop, jump, leap, skip, run, jog, gallop, and slide.
  • Identify examples of healthy snacks.
  • Identify different hydration choices.
  • Explain that choosing nutritious foods and being physically active are components of being healthy.

 

Music

During the kindergarten years, students focus on basic musical concepts through singing, playing instruments, listening, and moving. Emphasis is placed on beginning to obtain musical knowledge, skills, and understanding as performers, composers, and listeners. Students investigate personal feelings and preferences evoked by musical experiences.

By the end of Early Years, students are expected to:

  • Read music, including high and low pitches and rhythms.
  • Investigate various uses of the voice.
  • Sing a variety of songs of limited range alone and with others.
  • Play a variety of pitched and nonpitched instruments alone and with others.
  • Perform rhythmic patterns.
  • Demonstrate a steady beat.
  • Respond to music with movement.
  • Explore historical and cultural aspects of music.
  • Participate in music activities.
  • Recognize the relationships between music and other fields of knowledge.
  • Express personal feelings evoked
  • Communicate personal response to expressive features of music.

 

EARLY YEARS SCHOOL GRADING

The school year is divided into two semesters. Each semester is divided into two terms. At the close of each term, students receive a report card indicating the grades earned in each class. Absences, if any, are recorded on their report card which reflects attendance. (Please Check our School Handbook for more information: Student Handbook)