fbpx

Elementary School Academics

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL OVERVIEW

From their first days at DAIS, our Elementary students are active participants in their own learning. Caring and experienced teachers work diligently to ensure that all students have a smooth transition from home to school and progress successfully through the meticulously developed curriculum.
Our small class sizes allow for maximum teacher/student interaction, assisting students to learn to solve problems, create products and make meaning out of information in an American educational context.
English skills are developed through interaction with teachers and fellow students, alongside intensive reading programs and reading marathons. A reading buddy program has been developed whereby older students are paired with younger Elementary students to share skills and develop confidence. Our students are expected to speak English while on school, even during lunch and play time. This helps build vocabulary and fosters the long-term retention of language skills.

Our curriculum follows Common Core Standards and Virginia State Standards for student achievement developed in the United States. We utilize American accredited textbooks and strive to provide students with the same educational experiences that they would enjoy in an American school stateside.

OUR PROGRAM OF STUDIES 

Programs in Language Arts, Math, Social Studies and Science are complimented by classes in Music, Art, Computer, Library and Physical Education. You can find our supply list for elementary school through this link. ( Elementary School Supply List )

English

During the elementary years, students focus on reading, writing, language, listening and speaking. Students are exposed to a wide variety of literature, informational texts, and foundational skills. Students write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences. In addition, students learn to engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly. They exhibit command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

By the end of Grade 3, students are expected to:

  • Read, comprehend, and analyze literature and informational texts, including stories, dramas, poetry, history/social studies, science, and technical texts at the high end of the grade three text complexity band independently and proficiently.
  • Know and apply phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words.
  • Write opinion pieces, informative/explanatory texts, and narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.
  • Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade three topics and texts, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly.
  • Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening at a grade three level.

Mathematics

During the elementary years, students with support and guidance focus on four critical areas developing understanding of addition, subtraction, and strategies for addition and subtraction within 20. They develop an understanding of whole number relationships and place value, including grouping in tens and ones. They learn linear measurement and measuring lengths such as iterating length units. Students learn reasoning about attributes of and composing and decomposing geometric shapes.

By the end of Grade 3, students are expected to:

  • Develop an understanding of multiplication and division and strategies for multiplication and division within 100. Students develop an understanding of the meanings of multiplication and division of whole numbers through activities and problems involving equal-sized groups, arrays, and area models; multiplication is finding an unknown product, and division is finding an unknown factor in these situations.
  • Develop an understanding of fractions, beginning with unit fractions. Students view fractions in general as being built out of unit fractions, and they use fractions along with visual fraction models to represent parts of a whole.
  • Develop an understanding of the structure of rectangular arrays and of area. Students recognize area as an attribute of two-dimensional regions. Students understand that rectangular arrays can be decomposed into identical rows or into identical columns.
  • Describe and analyze two-dimensional shapes. Students compare and classify shapes by their sides and angles, and connect these with definitions of shapes. Students also relate their fraction work to geometry by expressing the area of part of a shape as a unit fraction of the whole.

Science

During grades three to four students form deeper connections between concepts and skills previously learned, such as evaluating methods for collecting data, revising models based on evidence, and analyzing data to make sense of phenomena. During this stage, students apply scientific ideas to solve design problems, learn that communicating with peers about proposed solutions is an important part of the design process, and that shared ideas can lead to improved designs to generate and compare multiple solutions to a problem.

By the end of Grade 3, students are expected to:

  • Develop an understanding of the similarities and differences in organisms’ life cycles and comprehend that organisms have different inherited traits, and are also affected by their environment.
  • Analyze data gathered and draw conclusions about variations in characteristics among individuals of the same species.
  • Investigate ways that humans and organisms, as a society, have changed and adapted to survive.
  • Describe typical weather conditions in different regions of the world using weather tools and identify patterns of weather in a given region to describe typical weather occurrences.
  • Claim that motion is affected by friction and force. Objects can change direction because of motion and analyze how magnets attract different types of metal.

Social Studies

Elementary students understand and develop the knowledge and skills of history, geography, civics, and economics that prepare them for informed, responsible, and participatory citizenship and develop their skills in debate, discussion, and writing. The program also provides students with a framework for continuing education in history and the social sciences through examining the social, cultural, and political characteristics of major ancient world cultures that will help students to recognize that many aspects of ancient cultures served as the foundation for modern governments, customs, traditions, and perspectives.

By the end of Grade 3, students are expected to:

  • Demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship.
  • Explain how the contributions of ancient China and Egypt have influenced the present world in terms of architecture, inventions, the calendar, and written language.
  • Develop map skills and an understanding of change of civilizations over time by locating major ancient world cultures on world maps and skills by using globes and maps to locate and describe major rivers, mountain ranges, and other geographic features.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of different cultures and the natural, human, and capital resources they used in the production of goods and services.
  • Recognize that because people and regions cannot produce everything they need, they specialize in what they do best and trade for the rest.
  • Explain the responsibilities of a good citizen.
  • Recognize the importance of government in the community.

Computer

Students recognize the differences between hardware and software.  They also gain  knowledge of the Microsoft Office Programs ranging from the formatting tools to gaining the skill of creating a professional project document. In MS-PowerPoint, they learn the different skills of how to complete an impressive and professional presentation to express their goals and objectives. Computer is integrated with other subjects such as when students are asked to complete efficient presentations.  The Computer curriculum is closely aligned with math as students use MS-Excel to do different Mathematical Operations and represent them visually through graphs. Students are also introduced to the first learning application in coding which is Scratch.

By the end of Grade 3, students are expected to:

  • Differentiate between hardware and software.
  • Know all Microsoft Office programs by names and icons.
  • Follow safety rules when using the internet.
  • Insert pictures from Google and reposition them.
  • Use Microsoft PowerPoint.
  • Create a presentation using software.

French

The elementary years French course is based on Virginia Standards for French language FII aligned with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages DELF A1. Elementary students continue to develop their communicative and cultural competence by interacting orally and in writing with other speakers of the target language, understanding oral and written messages in the language, and making oral and written presentations in the language.

 

By the end of Grade 3, students are expected to:

  • Give and follow basic instructions.
  • Exchange spoken and written information and ideas in French.
  • Ask and answer questions about self, others, and the immediate environment, such as people, things, plans, events, feelings, emotions.
  • Initiate, sustain, and close brief oral and written exchanges in French, using familiar and recombined phrases and sentences.
  • Demonstrate attention to accurate intonation and pronunciation.

German

The elementary German course is based on Virginia Standards for German language aligned with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. Elementary students continue to develop their communicative and cultural competence by interacting orally and in writing with other speakers of the target language, understanding oral and written messages in the language, and making oral and written presentations in the language

 

By the end of Grade 3, students are expected to:

  • Learn to communicate in real-life contexts about topics that are meaningful to them.
  • Develop communicative competence.
  • Develop a greater understanding of the structure of own language and the unique aspects of their own culture.

 

Art

Students learn through inquiry. Students examine aspects of the artistic process: idea generation, problem solving, and self-assessment. Students investigate the integral role of art and architecture within various cultures, and they combine knowledge of art and architecture, effective artistic processes and skills, and a variety of ideas to produce works of art.

By the end of Grade 3, students are expected to:

  • Describe and use steps of the art-making process, including brainstorming, preliminary sketching, and planning, to create works of art.
  • Identify craftsmanship in works of art.
  • Use imaginative and expressive strategies to create works of art.
  • Develop ideas inspired by a variety of sources, including print, non-print, and contemporary media, for incorporation into works of art.

Physical Education

Students refine, vary, and combine skills in complex situations and demonstrate more proficient movement patterns in educational games, dance, and gymnastic activities to become confident and competent movers. Students identify critical elements (small, isolated parts of the whole skill or movement) and apply them in their movement. They develop fitness knowledge and can relate regular physical activity to energy balance and health benefits. Students continue to build knowledge of body structures and systems. They know safe practices, rules, and procedures and apply them with little or no reinforcement. Students work cooperatively with peers and understand that there are many differences in movement skill and ability levels among their classmates.

By the end of Grade 3, students are expected to:

  • Demonstrate the critical elements for overhand throw and catch using a variety of objects; control, stop, and kick ball to stationary and moving partners/objects; dribble with dominant/preferred hand/foot; pass a ball to a moving partner; strike ball/object with short handled implement upward and forward; strike/bat ball off tee (correct grip, side to target, hip rotation); jump/land horizontally (distance) and vertically (height).
  • Demonstrate a self-turn rope sequence of four different jumps.
  • Demonstrate simple dances in various formations.
  • Apply the concept of open space while moving.
  • Identify major muscles, to include hamstrings and triceps.
  • Describe the components and function of the cardio respiratory system, to include heart, lungs, and blood vessels.

Music

During the elementary years, students focus on the language and production of music. Instruction focuses on the development of skills in singing, playing instruments, listening, moving, and responding to music. Emphasis is placed on performing simple rhythms and developing aural skills related to pitch, musical form, and instrument identification. Emphasis is also placed on ensemble playing, notating pitches and rhythms, and identifying orchestral instruments. Students continue to expand their knowledge of orchestral instruments and music from various cultures. Students also gain understanding of music styles and listen to, analyze, and describe music.

By the end of Elementary school students are expected to:

  • Read and notate music, demonstrate various uses of the voice sing a variety of songs alone and with others, play a variety of pitched and nonpitched instruments alone and with others, perform rhythmic patterns, respond to music with movement.
  • Create music, explore historical and cultural aspects of music, demonstrate audience and participant behaviors appropriate, and describe the relationships between music and other fields of knowledge.
  • Analyze and evaluate music, investigate aesthetic concepts related to music.

English

During the elementary years, students focus on reading, writing, language, listening and speaking. Students are exposed to a wide variety of literature, informational texts, and foundational skills. Students write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences. In addition, students learn to engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly. They exhibit command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

 

By the end of Grade 5, students are expected to:

  • Read, comprehend, and analyze literature and informative texts, including stories, dramas, poetry, social studies, science, and technical texts, at the high end of the grade five text complexity band independently and proficiently.
  • Write opinion pieces, narratives, and informative/explanatory texts that are clear and coherent through the writing process of planning, revising, editing, and rewriting and by using technology, including the internet, to produce and publish writing.
  • Conduct short research projects that use several sources to build knowledge through investigation of different aspects of a topic.
  • Comprehend, collaborate, and present knowledge and ideas in a range of discussions and with diverse partners on grade 5 topics and texts.
  • Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English appropriate to a fifth grade level such as capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when producing language.

 

Mathematics

During the elementary years, students with support and guidance focus on four critical areas developing understanding of addition, subtraction, and strategies for addition and subtraction within 20. They develop an understanding of whole number relationships and place value, including grouping in tens and ones. They learn linear measurement and measuring lengths such as iterating length units. Students learn reasoning about attributes of and composing and decomposing geometric shapes.

By the end of Grade 5, students are expected to:

  • Develop fluency with addition and subtraction of fractions, and develop understanding of the multiplication of fractions and of division of fractions in limited cases (unit fractions divided by whole numbers and whole numbers divided by unit fractions).
  • Extend division to 2-digit divisors, integrating decimal fractions into the place value system and develop understanding of operations with decimals to hundredths, and develop fluency with whole number and decimal operations.
  • Develop understanding of areas of 3D shapes and volumes.

 

Science

During grades three to four students form deeper connections between concepts and skills previously learned, such as evaluating methods for collecting data, revising models based on evidence, and analyzing data to make sense of phenomena. During this stage, students apply scientific ideas to solve design problems, learn that communicating with peers about proposed solutions is an important part of the design process, and that shared ideas can lead to improved designs to generate and compare multiple solutions to a problem.

 

By the end of Grade 5, students are expected to:

  • Measure and describe physical quantities such as weight, time, temperature, and volume. Then, make observations, measure and graph to produce data that can serve to identify materials based on their properties, structure or interaction with other materials.
  • Use evidence to construct an explanation for how the variations in characteristics among individuals of the same species may provide advantages in surviving, finding mates, and reproducing
  • Describe interdependent relationships within an ecosystem: how plants growth is primarily reliant on air and water and how animal food is derived from energy from the sun.
  • Make observations about how matter moves throughout the environment, and describe the flow of matter through a food chain.
  • Design models of the Earth-Sun system by examining patterns of night and day, Earth’s rotation, and relationships between apparent brightness and distance.

 

Social Studies

Elementary students understand and develop the knowledge and skills of history, geography, civics, and economics that prepare them for informed, responsible, and participatory citizenship and develop their skills in debate, discussion, and writing. The program also provides students with a framework for continuing education in history and the social sciences through examining the social, cultural, and political characteristics of major ancient world cultures that will help students to recognize that many aspects of ancient cultures served as the foundation for modern governments, customs, traditions, and perspectives.

 

By the end of Grade 5, students are expected to:

  • Demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship.
  • Apply social science skills to understand the period from the Paleolithic Era to the agricultural revolution.
  • Apply social science skills to understand the ancient river valley civilizations, including those of Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Indus River Valley, and China and the civilizations of the Hebrews and Phoenicians.

 

Computer

Students recognize the differences between hardware and software.  They also gain  knowledge of the Microsoft Office Programs ranging from the formatting tools to gaining the skill of creating a professional project document. In MS-PowerPoint, they learn the different skills of how to complete an impressive and professional presentation to express their goals and objectives. Computer is integrated with other subjects such as when students are asked to complete efficient presentations.  The Computer curriculum is closely aligned with math as students use MS-Excel to do different Mathematical Operations and represent them visually through graphs. Students are also introduced to the first learning application in coding which is Scratch.

 

By the end of Grade 5, students are expected to:

  • Insert numbers and texts
  • Format cells and calculate using Microsoft Excel
  • Print spreadsheets.
  • Create a graph and change its layout and style.
  • Utilize Scratch to change sprite colors and size and control sprite movement.

 

French

The elementary years French course is based on Virginia Standards for French language FII aligned with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages DELF A1. Elementary students continue to develop their communicative and cultural competence by interacting orally and in writing with other speakers of the target language, understanding oral and written messages in the language, and making oral and written presentations in the language.

 

By the end of Grade 5, students are expected to:

  • Understand basic spoken and written French presented through a variety of media in familiar contexts
  • Participate in brief oral and written exchanges that reflect present, past, and future time frames.
  • The student will present information orally and in writing in French, combining learned and original language in connected sentences and paragraphs on familiar topics.
  • Compare information acquired in other subject areas to topics discussed in French class.
  • Identify some details and key words when listening to and reading French.

 

German

The elementary German course is based on Virginia Standards for  German language aligned with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. Elementary students continue to develop their communicative and cultural competence by interacting orally and in writing with other speakers of the target language, understanding oral and written messages in the language, and making oral and written presentations in the language

 

By the end of Grade 5, the students are expected to:

  • Recognize familiar words and very basic and phrases concerning self, family and immediate concrete surroundings when people speak slowly and clearly.
  • Understand familiar names, words and very simple sentences, for example on notices and posters or in catalogues.
  • Interact in a simple way provided the other person is prepared to repeat or rephrase things at a slower rate of speech and help himself formulate what is being said.
  • Ask and answer simple questions in areas of immediate need or on very familiar topics.
  • Use simple phrases and sentences to describe where he lives and people he knows.
  • Write a short, simple postcard, for example sending holiday greetings.

 

Art

Students learn through inquiry. Students examine aspects of the artistic process: idea generation, problem solving, and self-assessment. Students investigate the integral role of art and architecture within various cultures, and they combine knowledge of art and architecture, effective artistic processes and skills, and a variety of ideas to produce works of art.

 

By the end of Grade 5, students are expected to:

  • Use atmospheric perspective in works of art.
  • Use size and proportion to emphasize spatial relationships in works of art.
  • Draw the human figure in proportion from observation.
  • Use contemporary media to create works of art.
  • Create sculpture in the round, high relief, or bas-relief, using three-dimensional media, including clay.
  • Combine various craft techniques in works of art.

 

Physical Education

Students refine, vary, and combine skills in complex situations and demonstrate more proficient movement patterns in educational games, dance, and gymnastic activities to become confident and competent movers. Students identify critical elements (small, isolated parts of the whole skill or movement) and apply them in their movement. They develop fitness knowledge and can relate regular physical activity to energy balance and health benefits. Students continue to build knowledge of body structures and systems. They know safe practices, rules, and procedures and apply them with little or no reinforcement. Students work cooperatively with peers and understand that there are many differences in movement skill and ability levels among their classmates.

 

By the end of Grade 5, students are expected to:

  • Create and perform an educational gymnastic sequence including travel, roll, balance, and weight transfer, with smooth transitions and changes of direction, shape, speed, and flow.
  • Create and perform individual or group rhythm/dance sequences including American and international dances ­and a jump-rope routine (self-turn or long rope).
  • Demonstrate use of space in a variety of activities.
  • Identify methods for evaluating and improving personal fitness such as health-related criterion referenced tests, heart rate, body mass index (BMI), and pedometer data.
  • Compare and analyze fitness data to health-related criterion-referenced standards (Virginia wellness-related fitness standards, Fitnessgram®, CDC guidelines) to assess levels of personal fitness and identify strengths and weaknesses.
  • Create a basic personal fitness plan for at least one health-related component of fitness, to include baseline fitness data, SMART goal, activities that will address the goal, log of activities inside and outside of school, reassessment data (post-data) and reflection of goal progress/attainment.

 

Music

During the elementary years, students focus on the language and production of music. Instruction focuses on the development of skills in singing, playing instruments, listening, moving, and responding to music. Emphasis is placed on performing simple rhythms and developing aural skills related to pitch, musical form, and instrument identification. Emphasis is also placed on ensemble playing, notating pitches and rhythms, and identifying orchestral instruments. Students continue to expand their knowledge of orchestral instruments and music from various cultures. Students also gain understanding of music styles and listen to, analyze, and describe music.

By the end of Elementary school students are expected to:

  • Read and notate music, demonstrate various uses of the voice sing a variety of songs alone and with others, play a variety of pitched and nonpitched instruments alone and with others, perform rhythmic patterns, respond to music with movement.
  • Create music, explore historical and cultural aspects of music, demonstrate audience and participant behaviors appropriate, and describe the relationships between music and other fields of knowledge.
  • Analyze and evaluate music, investigate aesthetic concepts related to music.

English

During the elementary years, students focus on reading, writing, language, listening and speaking. Students are exposed to a wide variety of literature, informational texts, and foundational skills. Students write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences. In addition, students learn to engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly. They exhibit command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

By the end of Grade 5, students are expected to:

  • Read, comprehend, and analyze literature and informative texts, including stories, dramas, poetry, social studies, science, and technical texts, at the high end of the grade five text complexity band independently and proficiently.
  • Write opinion pieces, narratives, and informative/explanatory texts that are clear and coherent through the writing process of planning, revising, editing, and rewriting and by using technology, including the internet, to produce and publish writing.
  • Conduct short research projects that use several sources to build knowledge through investigation of different aspects of a topic.
  • Comprehend, collaborate, and present knowledge and ideas in a range of discussions and with diverse partners on grade 5 topics and texts.
  • Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English appropriate to a fifth grade level such as capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when producing language.

Mathematics

During the elementary years, students with support and guidance focus on four critical areas developing understanding of addition, subtraction, and strategies for addition and subtraction within 20. They develop an understanding of whole number relationships and place value, including grouping in tens and ones. They learn linear measurement and measuring lengths such as iterating length units. Students learn reasoning about attributes of and composing and decomposing geometric shapes.

By the end of Grade 5, students are expected to:

  • Develop fluency with addition and subtraction of fractions, and develop understanding of the multiplication of fractions and of division of fractions in limited cases (unit fractions divided by whole numbers and whole numbers divided by unit fractions).
  • Extend division to 2-digit divisors, integrating decimal fractions into the place value system and develop understanding of operations with decimals to hundredths, and develop fluency with whole number and decimal operations.
  • Develop understanding of areas of 3D shapes and volumes.

Science

During grades three to four students form deeper connections between concepts and skills previously learned, such as evaluating methods for collecting data, revising models based on evidence, and analyzing data to make sense of phenomena. During this stage, students apply scientific ideas to solve design problems, learn that communicating with peers about proposed solutions is an important part of the design process, and that shared ideas can lead to improved designs to generate and compare multiple solutions to a problem.

By the end of Grade 5, students are expected to:

  • Measure and describe physical quantities such as weight, time, temperature, and volume. Then, make observations, measure and graph to produce data that can serve to identify materials based on their properties, structure or interaction with other materials.
  • Use evidence to construct an explanation for how the variations in characteristics among individuals of the same species may provide advantages in surviving, finding mates, and reproducing
  • Describe interdependent relationships within an ecosystem: how plants growth is primarily reliant on air and water and how animal food is derived from energy from the sun.
  • Make observations about how matter moves throughout the environment, and describe the flow of matter through a food chain.
  • Design models of the Earth-Sun system by examining patterns of night and day, Earth’s rotation, and relationships between apparent brightness and distance.

Social Studies

Elementary students understand and develop the knowledge and skills of history, geography, civics, and economics that prepare them for informed, responsible, and participatory citizenship and develop their skills in debate, discussion, and writing. The program also provides students with a framework for continuing education in history and the social sciences through examining the social, cultural, and political characteristics of major ancient world cultures that will help students to recognize that many aspects of ancient cultures served as the foundation for modern governments, customs, traditions, and perspectives.

By the end of Grade 5, students are expected to:

  • Demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship.
  • Apply social science skills to understand the period from the Paleolithic Era to the agricultural revolution.
  • Apply social science skills to understand the ancient river valley civilizations, including those of Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Indus River Valley, and China and the civilizations of the Hebrews and Phoenicians.

Computer

Students recognize the differences between hardware and software.  They also gain  knowledge of the Microsoft Office Programs ranging from the formatting tools to gaining the skill of creating a professional project document. In MS-PowerPoint, they learn the different skills of how to complete an impressive and professional presentation to express their goals and objectives. Computer is integrated with other subjects such as when students are asked to complete efficient presentations.  The Computer curriculum is closely aligned with math as students use MS-Excel to do different Mathematical Operations and represent them visually through graphs. Students are also introduced to the first learning application in coding which is Scratch.

By the end of Grade 5, students are expected to:

  • Insert numbers and texts
  • Format cells and calculate using Microsoft Excel
  • Print spreadsheets.
  • Create a graph and change its layout and style.
  • Utilize Scratch to change sprite colors and size and control sprite movement.

French

The elementary years French course is based on Virginia Standards for French language FII aligned with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages DELF A1. Elementary students continue to develop their communicative and cultural competence by interacting orally and in writing with other speakers of the target language, understanding oral and written messages in the language, and making oral and written presentations in the language.

 

By the end of Grade 5, students are expected to:

  • Understand basic spoken and written French presented through a variety of media in familiar contexts
  • Participate in brief oral and written exchanges that reflect present, past, and future time frames.
  • The student will present information orally and in writing in French, combining learned and original language in connected sentences and paragraphs on familiar topics.
  • Compare information acquired in other subject areas to topics discussed in French class.
  • Identify some details and key words when listening to and reading French.

German

The elementary German course is based on Virginia Standards for  German language aligned with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. Elementary students continue to develop their communicative and cultural competence by interacting orally and in writing with other speakers of the target language, understanding oral and written messages in the language, and making oral and written presentations in the language

 

By the end of Grade 5, the students are expected to:

  • Recognize familiar words and very basic and phrases concerning self, family and immediate concrete surroundings when people speak slowly and clearly.
  • Understand familiar names, words and very simple sentences, for example on notices and posters or in catalogues.
  • Interact in a simple way provided the other person is prepared to repeat or rephrase things at a slower rate of speech and help himself formulate what is being said.
  • Ask and answer simple questions in areas of immediate need or on very familiar topics.
  • Use simple phrases and sentences to describe where he lives and people he knows.
  • Write a short, simple postcard, for example sending holiday greetings.

 

Art

Students learn through inquiry. Students examine aspects of the artistic process: idea generation, problem solving, and self-assessment. Students investigate the integral role of art and architecture within various cultures, and they combine knowledge of art and architecture, effective artistic processes and skills, and a variety of ideas to produce works of art.

By the end of Grade 5, students are expected to:

  • Use atmospheric perspective in works of art.
  • Use size and proportion to emphasize spatial relationships in works of art.
  • Draw the human figure in proportion from observation.
  • Use contemporary media to create works of art.
  • Create sculpture in the round, high relief, or bas-relief, using three-dimensional media, including clay.
  • Combine various craft techniques in works of art.

Physical Education

Students refine, vary, and combine skills in complex situations and demonstrate more proficient movement patterns in educational games, dance, and gymnastic activities to become confident and competent movers. Students identify critical elements (small, isolated parts of the whole skill or movement) and apply them in their movement. They develop fitness knowledge and can relate regular physical activity to energy balance and health benefits. Students continue to build knowledge of body structures and systems. They know safe practices, rules, and procedures and apply them with little or no reinforcement. Students work cooperatively with peers and understand that there are many differences in movement skill and ability levels among their classmates.

By the end of Grade 5, students are expected to:

  • Create and perform an educational gymnastic sequence including travel, roll, balance, and weight transfer, with smooth transitions and changes of direction, shape, speed, and flow.
  • Create and perform individual or group rhythm/dance sequences including American and international dances ­and a jump-rope routine (self-turn or long rope).
  • Demonstrate use of space in a variety of activities.
  • Identify methods for evaluating and improving personal fitness such as health-related criterion referenced tests, heart rate, body mass index (BMI), and pedometer data.
  • Compare and analyze fitness data to health-related criterion-referenced standards (Virginia wellness-related fitness standards, Fitnessgram®, CDC guidelines) to assess levels of personal fitness and identify strengths and weaknesses.
  • Create a basic personal fitness plan for at least one health-related component of fitness, to include baseline fitness data, SMART goal, activities that will address the goal, log of activities inside and outside of school, reassessment data (post-data) and reflection of goal progress/attainment.

Music

During the elementary years, students focus on the language and production of music. Instruction focuses on the development of skills in singing, playing instruments, listening, moving, and responding to music. Emphasis is placed on performing simple rhythms and developing aural skills related to pitch, musical form, and instrument identification. Emphasis is also placed on ensemble playing, notating pitches and rhythms, and identifying orchestral instruments. Students continue to expand their knowledge of orchestral instruments and music from various cultures. Students also gain understanding of music styles and listen to, analyze, and describe music.

By the end of Elementary school students are expected to:

  • Read and notate music, demonstrate various uses of the voice sing a variety of songs alone and with others, play a variety of pitched and nonpitched instruments alone and with others, perform rhythmic patterns, respond to music with movement.
  • Create music, explore historical and cultural aspects of music, demonstrate audience and participant behaviors appropriate, and describe the relationships between music and other fields of knowledge.
  • Analyze and evaluate music, investigate aesthetic concepts related to music.

English

During the elementary years, students focus on reading, writing, language, listening and speaking. Students are exposed to a wide variety of literature, informational texts, and foundational skills. Students write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences. In addition, students learn to engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly. They exhibit command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

By the end of Grade 3, students are expected to:

  • Read, comprehend, and analyze literature and informational texts, including stories, dramas, poetry, history/social studies, science, and technical texts at the high end of the grade three text complexity band independently and proficiently.
  • Know and apply phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words.
  • Write opinion pieces, informative/explanatory texts, and narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.
  • Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade three topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.
  • Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening at a grade three level.

Mathematics

During the elementary years, students with support and guidance focus on four critical areas developing understanding of addition, subtraction, and strategies for addition and subtraction within 20. They develop an understanding of whole number relationships and place value, including grouping in tens and ones. They learn linear measurement and measuring lengths such as iterating length units. Students learn reasoning about attributes of and composing and decomposing geometric shapes.

By the end of Grade 3, students are expected to:

  • Develop an understanding of multiplication and division and strategies for multiplication and division within 100. Students develop an understanding of the meanings of multiplication and division of whole numbers through activities and problems involving equal-sized groups, arrays, and area models; multiplication is finding an unknown product, and division is finding an unknown factor in these situations.
  • Develop an understanding of fractions, beginning with unit fractions. Students view fractions in general as being built out of unit fractions, and they use fractions along with visual fraction models to represent parts of a whole.
  • Develop an understanding of the structure of rectangular arrays and of area. Students recognize area as an attribute of two-dimensional regions. Students understand that rectangular arrays can be decomposed into identical rows or into identical columns.
  • Describe and analyze two-dimensional shapes. Students compare and classify shapes by their sides and angles, and connect these with definitions of shapes. Students also relate their fraction work to geometry by expressing the area of part of a shape as a unit fraction of the whole.

Science

During grades three to four students form deeper connections between concepts and skills previously learned, such as evaluating methods for collecting data, revising models based on evidence, and analyzing data to make sense of phenomena. During this stage, students apply scientific ideas to solve design problems, learn that communicating with peers about proposed solutions is an important part of the design process, and that shared ideas can lead to improved designs to generate and compare multiple solutions to a problem.

By the end of Grade 3, students are expected to:

  • Develop an understanding of the similarities and differences in organisms’ life cycles and comprehend that organisms have different inherited traits, and are also affected by their environment.
  • Analyze data gathered and draw conclusions about variations in characteristics among individuals of the same species.
  • Investigate ways that humans and organisms, as a society, have changed and adapted to survive.
  • Describe typical weather conditions in different regions of the world using weather tools and identify patterns of weather in a given region to describe typical weather occurrences.
  • Claim that motion is affected by friction and force. Objects can change direction because of motion and analyze how magnets attract different types of metal.

Social Studies

Elementary students understand and develop the knowledge and skills of history, geography, civics, and economics that prepare them for informed, responsible, and participatory citizenship and develop their skills in debate, discussion, and writing. The program also provides students with a framework for continuing education in history and the social sciences through examining the social, cultural, and political characteristics of major ancient world cultures that will help students to recognize that many aspects of ancient cultures served as the foundation for modern governments, customs, traditions, and perspectives.

By the end of Grade 3, students are expected to:

  • Demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship.
  • Explain how the contributions of ancient China and Egypt have influenced the present world in terms of architecture, inventions, the calendar, and written language.
  • Develop map skills and an understanding of change of civilizations over time by locating major ancient world cultures on world maps and skills by using globes and maps to locate and describe major rivers, mountain ranges, and other geographic features.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of different cultures and the natural, human, and capital resources they used in the production of goods and services.
  • Recognize that because people and regions cannot produce everything they need, they specialize in what they do best and trade for the rest.
  • Explain the responsibilities of a good citizen.
  • Recognize the importance of government in the community.

Computer

Students recognize the differences between hardware and software.  They also gain  knowledge of the Microsoft Office Programs ranging from the formatting tools to gaining the skill of creating a professional project document. In MS-PowerPoint, they learn the different skills of how to complete an impressive and professional presentation to express their goals and objectives. Computer is integrated with other subjects such as when students are asked to complete efficient presentations.  The Computer curriculum is closely aligned with math as students use MS-Excel to do different Mathematical Operations and represent them visually through graphs. Students are also introduced to the first learning application in coding which is Scratch.

By the end of Grade 3, students are expected to:

  • Differentiate between hardware and software.
  • Know all Microsoft Office programs by names and icons.
  • Follow safety rules when using the internet.
  • Insert pictures from Google and reposition them.
  • Use Microsoft PowerPoint.
  • Create a presentation using software.

French

The elementary years French course is based on Virginia Standards for French language FII aligned with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages DELF A1. Elementary students continue to develop their communicative and cultural competence by interacting orally and in writing with other speakers of the target language, understanding oral and written messages in the language, and making oral and written presentations in the language.

 

By the end of Grade 3, students are expected to:

  • Give and follow basic instructions.
  • Exchange spoken and written information and ideas in French.
  • Ask and answer questions about self, others, and the immediate environment, such as people, things, plans, events, feelings, emotions.
  • Initiate, sustain, and close brief oral and written exchanges in French, using familiar and recombined phrases and sentences.
  • Demonstrate attention to accurate intonation and pronunciation.

German

The elementary German course is based on Virginia Standards for German language aligned with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. Elementary students continue to develop their communicative and cultural competence by interacting orally and in writing with other speakers of the target language, understanding oral and written messages in the language, and making oral and written presentations in the language

 

By the end of Grade 3, students are expected to:

  • Learn to communicate in real-life contexts about topics that are meaningful to them.
  • Develop communicative competence.
  • Develop a greater understanding of the structure of own language and the unique aspects of their own culture.

 

Art

Students learn through inquiry. Students examine aspects of the artistic process: idea generation, problem solving, and self-assessment. Students investigate the integral role of art and architecture within various cultures, and they combine knowledge of art and architecture, effective artistic processes and skills, and a variety of ideas to produce works of art.

By the end of Grade 3, students are expected to:

  • Describe and use steps of the art-making process, including brainstorming, preliminary sketching, and planning, to create works of art.
  • Identify craftsmanship in works of art.
  • Use imaginative and expressive strategies to create works of art.
  • Develop ideas inspired by a variety of sources, including print, non-print, and contemporary media, for incorporation into works of art.

Physical Education

Students refine, vary, and combine skills in complex situations and demonstrate more proficient movement patterns in educational games, dance, and gymnastic activities to become confident and competent movers. Students identify critical elements (small, isolated parts of the whole skill or movement) and apply them in their movement. They develop fitness knowledge and can relate regular physical activity to energy balance and health benefits. Students continue to build knowledge of body structures and systems. They know safe practices, rules, and procedures and apply them with little or no reinforcement. Students work cooperatively with peers and understand that there are many differences in movement skill and ability levels among their classmates.

By the end of Grade 3, students are expected to:

  • Demonstrate the critical elements for overhand throw and catch using a variety of objects; control, stop, and kick ball to stationary and moving partners/objects; dribble with dominant/preferred hand/foot; pass a ball to a moving partner; strike ball/object with short handled implement upward and forward; strike/bat ball off tee (correct grip, side to target, hip rotation); jump/land horizontally (distance) and vertically (height).
  • Demonstrate a self-turn rope sequence of four different jumps.
  • Demonstrate simple dances in various formations.
  • Apply the concept of open space while moving.
  • Identify major muscles, to include hamstrings and triceps.
  • Describe the components and function of the cardio respiratory system, to include heart, lungs, and blood vessels.

Music

During the elementary years, students focus on the language and production of music. Instruction focuses on the development of skills in singing, playing instruments, listening, moving, and responding to music. Emphasis is placed on performing simple rhythms and developing aural skills related to pitch, musical form, and instrument identification. Emphasis is also placed on ensemble playing, notating pitches and rhythms, and identifying orchestral instruments. Students continue to expand their knowledge of orchestral instruments and music from various cultures. Students also gain understanding of music styles and listen to, analyze, and describe music.

By the end of Elementary school students are expected to:

  • Read and notate music, demonstrate various uses of the voice sing a variety of songs alone and with others, play a variety of pitched and nonpitched instruments alone and with others, perform rhythmic patterns, respond to music with movement.
  • Create music, explore historical and cultural aspects of music, demonstrate audience and participant behaviors appropriate, and describe the relationships between music and other fields of knowledge.
  • Analyze and evaluate music, investigate aesthetic concepts related to music.

English

During the elementary years, students focus on reading, writing, language, listening and speaking. Students are exposed to a wide variety of literature, informational texts, and foundational skills. Students write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences. In addition, students learn to engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly. They exhibit command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

 

By the end of Grade 4, students are expected to:

  • Read, comprehend, and analyze literature, and informational texts including stories, dramas, poetry, history/social studies, science, and technical texts in the fourth grade complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.
  • Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
  • Differentiate between contexts that call for formal English (e.g., presenting ideas) and situations where informal discourse is appropriate (e.g., small-group discussion); use formal English when appropriate to task and situation.
  • Acquire and use accurately grade four general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, including those that signal precise actions, emotions, or states of being and that are basic to a particular topic.

 

Mathematics

During the elementary years, students with support and guidance focus on four critical areas developing understanding of addition, subtraction, and strategies for addition and subtraction within 20. They develop an understanding of whole number relationships and place value, including grouping in tens and ones. They learn linear measurement and measuring lengths such as iterating length units. Students learn reasoning about attributes of and composing and decomposing geometric shapes.

By the end of Grade 4, students are expected to:

  • Use the four operations with whole numbers to solve problems. Gain familiarity with factors and multiples. Generate and analyze patterns.
  • Generalize place value understanding for multi-digit whole numbers. Use place value understanding and properties of operations to perform multi-digit arithmetic.
  • Extend understanding of fraction equivalence and ordering. Build fractions from unit fractions by applying and extending previous understandings of operations on whole numbers. Understand decimal notation for fractions, and compare decimal fractions.
  • Solve problems involving measurement and conversion of measurements from a larger unit to a smaller unit. Represent and interpret data.
  • Understand concepts of angle and measure angles. Draw and identify lines and angles, and classify shapes by properties of their lines and angles.

 

Science

During grades three to four students form deeper connections between concepts and skills previously learned, such as evaluating methods for collecting data, revising models based on evidence, and analyzing data to make sense of phenomena. During this stage, students apply scientific ideas to solve design problems, learn that communicating with peers about proposed solutions is an important part of the design process, and that shared ideas can lead to improved designs to generate and compare multiple solutions to a problem.

 

By the end of Grade 4, students are expected to:

  • Develop an understanding for how animals survive in their habitats, and analyze the various adaptations animals possess in order to survive, grow, and reproduce.
  • Develop an understanding of how weathering can affect the rate of erosion.
  • Analyze data gathered and draw conclusions about how the earth’s natural weather events can impact human communication and functions.
  • Identify fossil fuels and alternatives energy resources.
  • Develop an understanding of how energy is transferred in a variety of ways and between objects.
  • Analyze the various functions of energy, and categorize its uses in our everyday lives.
  • Determine the pros and cons of a specific alternative energy source and determine if it is beneficial to your community’s environment

 

Social Studies

Elementary students understand and develop the knowledge and skills of history, geography, civics, and economics that prepare them for informed, responsible, and participatory citizenship and develop their skills in debate, discussion, and writing. The program also provides students with a framework for continuing education in history and the social sciences through examining the social, cultural, and political characteristics of major ancient world cultures that will help students to recognize that many aspects of ancient cultures served as the foundation for modern governments, customs, traditions, and perspectives.

 

By the end of Grade 4, students are expected to:

  • Demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between physical geography and the lives of the native peoples, past and present.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the first permanent English settlement in America.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of life in the Virginia colony.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the role of Virginia in the establishment of the new American nation.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of Virginia during the twentieth century and beyond.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of Virginia government, geography, and economics.

 

Computer

Students recognize the differences between hardware and software.  They also gain  knowledge of the Microsoft Office Programs ranging from the formatting tools to gaining the skill of creating a professional project document. In MS-PowerPoint, they learn the different skills of how to complete an impressive and professional presentation to express their goals and objectives. Computer is integrated with other subjects such as when students are asked to complete efficient presentations.  The Computer curriculum is closely aligned with math as students use MS-Excel to do different Mathematical Operations and represent them visually through graphs. Students are also introduced to the first learning application in coding which is Scratch.

 

By the end of Grade 4, students are expected to:

  • Differentiate between input and output devices.
  • Format paragraphs by using spacing and borders.
  • Add backgrounds with different options.
  • Insert and format tabs and tables.
  • Use Scratch and how to draw with a sprite and adding sounds

 

French

The elementary years French course is based on Virginia Standards for French language FII aligned with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages DELF A1. Elementary students continue to develop their communicative and cultural competence by interacting orally and in writing with other speakers of the target language, understanding oral and written messages in the language, and making oral and written presentations in the language.

 

By the end of Grade 4, students are expected to:

  • Understand basic spoken and written French presented through a variety of media in familiar contexts.
  • Identify some details and key words when listening to and reading French.
  • Use verbal and nonverbal cues to interpret spoken and written texts in French.
  • Interpret culturally appropriate gestures, body language, and intonation in order to clarify the message.

 

German

The elementary German course is based on Virginia Standards for  German language aligned with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. Elementary students continue to develop their communicative and cultural competence by interacting orally and in writing with other speakers of the target language, understanding oral and written messages in the language, and making oral and written presentations in the language

By the end of Grade 4, students are expected to:

  • Understand and use familiar everyday expressions and very basic phrases
  • Introduce themselves and others.
  • Ask and answer questions about personal details such as where they live, people they know and things they have.
  • Interact in a simple way provided the other person talks slowly and clearly.

 

Art

Students learn through inquiry. Students examine aspects of the artistic process: idea generation, problem solving, and self-assessment. Students investigate the integral role of art and architecture within various cultures, and they combine knowledge of art and architecture, effective artistic processes and skills, and a variety of ideas to produce works of art.

 

By the end of Grade 4, students are expected to

  • Create the illusion of depth on a two-dimensional surface, using overlapping, size variation, and placement on the picture plane.
  • Use contour drawing and shading techniques to create observational drawings.
  • Describe and use hand-building techniques to make a ceramic work of art.
  • Use craft techniques in works of art.

 

Physical Education

Students refine, vary, and combine skills in complex situations and demonstrate more proficient movement patterns in educational games, dance, and gymnastic activities to become confident and competent movers. Students identify critical elements (small, isolated parts of the whole skill or movement) and apply them in their movement. They develop fitness knowledge and can relate regular physical activity to energy balance and health benefits. Students continue to build knowledge of body structures and systems. They know safe practices, rules, and procedures and apply them with little or no reinforcement. Students work cooperatively with peers and understand that there are many differences in movement skill and ability levels among their classmates.

 

By the end of Grade 4, students are expected to:

  • Demonstrate the use of pacing, speed, and endurance in a variety of activities.
  • Demonstrate the ability to self-pace in a cardiovascular endurance activity.
  • Provide appropriate feedback to a peer to improve performance.
  • Create and perform a jump-rope routine (self-turn or long rope).
  • Create a SMART (specific, measurable, attainable, realistic, timely) goal for at least one health-related component of fitness to improve or maintain fitness level.
  • Identify activities that can be done at school and activities that can be done at home to meet fitness goals.
  • Analyze post-fitness testing results, and reflect on goal progress/attainment.

 

Music

During the elementary years, students focus on the language and production of music. Instruction focuses on the development of skills in singing, playing instruments, listening, moving, and responding to music. Emphasis is placed on performing simple rhythms and developing aural skills related to pitch, musical form, and instrument identification. Emphasis is also placed on ensemble playing, notating pitches and rhythms, and identifying orchestral instruments. Students continue to expand their knowledge of orchestral instruments and music from various cultures. Students also gain understanding of music styles and listen to, analyze, and describe music.

By the end of Elementary school students are expected to:

  • Read and notate music, demonstrate various uses of the voice sing a variety of songs alone and with others, play a variety of pitched and nonpitched instruments alone and with others, perform rhythmic patterns, respond to music with movement.
  • Create music, explore historical and cultural aspects of music, demonstrate audience and participant behaviors appropriate, and describe the relationships between music and other fields of knowledge.
  • Analyze and evaluate music, investigate aesthetic concepts related to music.

 

English

During the elementary years, students focus on reading, writing, language, listening and speaking. Students are exposed to a wide variety of literature, informational texts, and foundational skills. Students write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences. In addition, students learn to engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly. They exhibit command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

 

By the end of Grade 5, students are expected to:

  • Read, comprehend, and analyze literature and informative texts, including stories, dramas, poetry, social studies, science, and technical texts, at the high end of the grade five text complexity band independently and proficiently.
  • Write opinion pieces, narratives, and informative/explanatory texts that are clear and coherent through the writing process of planning, revising, editing, and rewriting and by using technology, including the internet, to produce and publish writing.
  • Conduct short research projects that use several sources to build knowledge through investigation of different aspects of a topic.
  • Comprehend, collaborate, and present knowledge and ideas in a range of discussions and with diverse partners on grade 5 topics and texts.
  • Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English appropriate to a fifth grade level such as capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when producing language.

 

Mathematics

During the elementary years, students with support and guidance focus on four critical areas developing understanding of addition, subtraction, and strategies for addition and subtraction within 20. They develop an understanding of whole number relationships and place value, including grouping in tens and ones. They learn linear measurement and measuring lengths such as iterating length units. Students learn reasoning about attributes of and composing and decomposing geometric shapes.

By the end of Grade 5, students are expected to:

  • Develop fluency with addition and subtraction of fractions, and develop understanding of the multiplication of fractions and of division of fractions in limited cases (unit fractions divided by whole numbers and whole numbers divided by unit fractions).
  • Extend division to 2-digit divisors, integrating decimal fractions into the place value system and develop understanding of operations with decimals to hundredths, and develop fluency with whole number and decimal operations.
  • Develop understanding of areas of 3D shapes and volumes.

 

Science

During grades three to four students form deeper connections between concepts and skills previously learned, such as evaluating methods for collecting data, revising models based on evidence, and analyzing data to make sense of phenomena. During this stage, students apply scientific ideas to solve design problems, learn that communicating with peers about proposed solutions is an important part of the design process, and that shared ideas can lead to improved designs to generate and compare multiple solutions to a problem.

 

By the end of Grade 5, students are expected to:

  • Measure and describe physical quantities such as weight, time, temperature, and volume. Then, make observations, measure and graph to produce data that can serve to identify materials based on their properties, structure or interaction with other materials.
  • Use evidence to construct an explanation for how the variations in characteristics among individuals of the same species may provide advantages in surviving, finding mates, and reproducing
  • Describe interdependent relationships within an ecosystem: how plants growth is primarily reliant on air and water and how animal food is derived from energy from the sun.
  • Make observations about how matter moves throughout the environment, and describe the flow of matter through a food chain.
  • Design models of the Earth-Sun system by examining patterns of night and day, Earth’s rotation, and relationships between apparent brightness and distance.

 

Social Studies

Elementary students understand and develop the knowledge and skills of history, geography, civics, and economics that prepare them for informed, responsible, and participatory citizenship and develop their skills in debate, discussion, and writing. The program also provides students with a framework for continuing education in history and the social sciences through examining the social, cultural, and political characteristics of major ancient world cultures that will help students to recognize that many aspects of ancient cultures served as the foundation for modern governments, customs, traditions, and perspectives.

 

By the end of Grade 5, students are expected to:

  • Demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship.
  • Apply social science skills to understand the period from the Paleolithic Era to the agricultural revolution.
  • Apply social science skills to understand the ancient river valley civilizations, including those of Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Indus River Valley, and China and the civilizations of the Hebrews and Phoenicians.

 

Computer

Students recognize the differences between hardware and software.  They also gain  knowledge of the Microsoft Office Programs ranging from the formatting tools to gaining the skill of creating a professional project document. In MS-PowerPoint, they learn the different skills of how to complete an impressive and professional presentation to express their goals and objectives. Computer is integrated with other subjects such as when students are asked to complete efficient presentations.  The Computer curriculum is closely aligned with math as students use MS-Excel to do different Mathematical Operations and represent them visually through graphs. Students are also introduced to the first learning application in coding which is Scratch.

 

By the end of Grade 5, students are expected to:

  • Insert numbers and texts
  • Format cells and calculate using Microsoft Excel
  • Print spreadsheets.
  • Create a graph and change its layout and style.
  • Utilize Scratch to change sprite colors and size and control sprite movement.

 

French

The elementary years French course is based on Virginia Standards for French language FII aligned with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages DELF A1. Elementary students continue to develop their communicative and cultural competence by interacting orally and in writing with other speakers of the target language, understanding oral and written messages in the language, and making oral and written presentations in the language.

 

By the end of Grade 5, students are expected to:

  • Understand basic spoken and written French presented through a variety of media in familiar contexts
  • Participate in brief oral and written exchanges that reflect present, past, and future time frames.
  • The student will present information orally and in writing in French, combining learned and original language in connected sentences and paragraphs on familiar topics.
  • Compare information acquired in other subject areas to topics discussed in French class.
  • Identify some details and key words when listening to and reading French.

 

German

The elementary German course is based on Virginia Standards for  German language aligned with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. Elementary students continue to develop their communicative and cultural competence by interacting orally and in writing with other speakers of the target language, understanding oral and written messages in the language, and making oral and written presentations in the language

 

By the end of Grade 5, the students are expected to:

  • Recognize familiar words and very basic and phrases concerning self, family and immediate concrete surroundings when people speak slowly and clearly.
  • Understand familiar names, words and very simple sentences, for example on notices and posters or in catalogues.
  • Interact in a simple way provided the other person is prepared to repeat or rephrase things at a slower rate of speech and help himself formulate what is being said.
  • Ask and answer simple questions in areas of immediate need or on very familiar topics.
  • Use simple phrases and sentences to describe where he lives and people he knows.
  • Write a short, simple postcard, for example sending holiday greetings.

 

Art

Students learn through inquiry. Students examine aspects of the artistic process: idea generation, problem solving, and self-assessment. Students investigate the integral role of art and architecture within various cultures, and they combine knowledge of art and architecture, effective artistic processes and skills, and a variety of ideas to produce works of art.

 

By the end of Grade 5, students are expected to:

  • Use atmospheric perspective in works of art.
  • Use size and proportion to emphasize spatial relationships in works of art.
  • Draw the human figure in proportion from observation.
  • Use contemporary media to create works of art.
  • Create sculpture in the round, high relief, or bas-relief, using three-dimensional media, including clay.
  • Combine various craft techniques in works of art.

 

Physical Education

Students refine, vary, and combine skills in complex situations and demonstrate more proficient movement patterns in educational games, dance, and gymnastic activities to become confident and competent movers. Students identify critical elements (small, isolated parts of the whole skill or movement) and apply them in their movement. They develop fitness knowledge and can relate regular physical activity to energy balance and health benefits. Students continue to build knowledge of body structures and systems. They know safe practices, rules, and procedures and apply them with little or no reinforcement. Students work cooperatively with peers and understand that there are many differences in movement skill and ability levels among their classmates.

 

By the end of Grade 5, students are expected to:

  • Create and perform an educational gymnastic sequence including travel, roll, balance, and weight transfer, with smooth transitions and changes of direction, shape, speed, and flow.
  • Create and perform individual or group rhythm/dance sequences including American and international dances ­and a jump-rope routine (self-turn or long rope).
  • Demonstrate use of space in a variety of activities.
  • Identify methods for evaluating and improving personal fitness such as health-related criterion referenced tests, heart rate, body mass index (BMI), and pedometer data.
  • Compare and analyze fitness data to health-related criterion-referenced standards (Virginia wellness-related fitness standards, Fitnessgram®, CDC guidelines) to assess levels of personal fitness and identify strengths and weaknesses.
  • Create a basic personal fitness plan for at least one health-related component of fitness, to include baseline fitness data, SMART goal, activities that will address the goal, log of activities inside and outside of school, reassessment data (post-data) and reflection of goal progress/attainment.

 

Music

During the elementary years, students focus on the language and production of music. Instruction focuses on the development of skills in singing, playing instruments, listening, moving, and responding to music. Emphasis is placed on performing simple rhythms and developing aural skills related to pitch, musical form, and instrument identification. Emphasis is also placed on ensemble playing, notating pitches and rhythms, and identifying orchestral instruments. Students continue to expand their knowledge of orchestral instruments and music from various cultures. Students also gain understanding of music styles and listen to, analyze, and describe music.

By the end of Elementary school students are expected to:

  • Read and notate music, demonstrate various uses of the voice sing a variety of songs alone and with others, play a variety of pitched and nonpitched instruments alone and with others, perform rhythmic patterns, respond to music with movement.
  • Create music, explore historical and cultural aspects of music, demonstrate audience and participant behaviors appropriate, and describe the relationships between music and other fields of knowledge.
  • Analyze and evaluate music, investigate aesthetic concepts related to music.

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL GRADING

The school year is divided into two semesters. Each semester is divided into two terms. At the close of each term, students receive a report card indicating the grades earned in each class. Absences, if any, are recorded on their report card which reflects attendance. (Please Check our School Handbook for more information: Student Handbook)