fbpx

High School Academics

HIGH SCHOOL OVERVIEW

Our curriculum is developed through collaborative planning and is based on the Common Core State Standards as well as the Virginia State Standards and the Ministry of Education (Egypt) curricula. The school has an established curriculum review, development and implementation cycle. Curriculum maps are developed with corresponding unit plans. Alignment is found in the maps, unit plans, lesson plans as well as the assessments. Staff track progress and alter planning as demonstrated by student need. Time is provided for grade meetings as well as subject specific meetings with coordinators. Rigor is valued as evident in the common usage of Bloom’s Taxonomy of Learning Needs in each division. Topics and instructional strategies strive for maximum student engagement in the learning process. Project based learning as well as cooperative learning permit individual students to investigate in depth related and relevant topics of interest. Our goal is to prepare our students for entry into highly competitive universities in Egypt and abroad. Inquiry, critical thinking and problem solving approaches to curriculum delivery are utilized in our classrooms.

OUR PROGRAM OF STUDIES 

All students are expected to carry a full program of studies. The courses in High School are English, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, Foreign Language, Arabic, Computer, Physical Education, Religion, Arabic Social Studies, Art and Music. You can find our supply list for high school through this link. ( High School Supply List )

English

The High School English Language Arts curriculum is aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The English Language Arts course provides a balance of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language cumulative skills essential for success in the 21st Century. This course is designed to extend the range of oral communication, reading, writing, and media literacy skills that students need. Students interpret, analyze, compare, and evaluate a variety of literary, informational and graphic texts. Students compose a variety of genres at increasing levels of difficulty each year and learn to use and adjust language in all writing tasks to best communicate ideas, content, and message to readers. They use organizational skills, audience awareness, and both verbal and nonverbal presentation skills to plan and deliver effective oral presentations. Students show mastery of the conventions of academic language.

By the end of Grade 9, students are expected to:

  • Analyze, and evaluate narratives, poetry, and drama by making connections to other texts, ideas, cultural perspectives, eras, personal events and situations.
  • Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses rhetoric to advance that point of view or purpose.
  • Write clear and coherent arguments, informative/explanatory, and narratives in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
  • Strengthen writing by planning, revising, editing, and rewriting.
  • Use technology, including the internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products and present the relationships between information and ideas efficiently as well as to interact and collaborate with others.
  • Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
  • Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions and with diverse partners on grade 9 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.

 

Mathematics

In High school we are following Common Core standards for Math, which aim to create a more standardized math curriculum across the country. The Common Core standards state that six content categories should be covered in high school math classes are algebra, functions, modeling, geometry, statistics, and probability. The typical order of math classes in high school is as follows: algebra 1 and geometry in grade 9, algebra 2/trigonometry in grade 10, Pre-Calculus in grade 11, calculus and statistics in grade 12.

By the end of Grade 9, students are expected to:

  • Perform operations using functions, with special emphasis on linear functions. Learn to represent them in multiple ways – as verbal description, equations, inequalities, tables, and graphs.
  • Model real-world situations using functions in order to solve problems arising from those situations.
  • Work using probability and data analysis and interpret them into understandable situations. Use the rules of probability to compute probabilities of compound events in a uniform probability model.
  • Summarize, represent, and interpret data on a single count or measurement variable.

 

Science

During grades nine to twelve, students begin to form deeper connections between concepts and skills previously learned such as applying statistics to scientific questions, evaluating limitations of models, and creating algorithms to solve problems. Students learn how to analyze major global challenges, design a solution to a complex real- world problem by breaking it down into smaller and more manageable problems that can be solved through engineering, and to evaluate solutions and then model the impact of the proposed solutions.

By the end of the Physical Science course, Grade 9 students are expected to:

  • Plan and conduct an investigation to provide evidence that an electric current can produce a magnetic field and that a changing magnetic field can produce an electric current.
  • Analyze data to support the claim that Newton’s second law of motion describes the mathematical relationship among the net force on a macroscopic object, its mass, and its acceleration.
  • Use mathematical representations to support a claim regarding relationships among the frequency, wavelength, and speed of waves traveling in various media.
  • Use the periodic table as a model to predict the relative properties of elements based on the patterns of electrons in the outermost energy level of atoms.
  • Construct and revise an explanation for the outcome of a simple chemical reaction based on the outermost electron states of atoms, trends in the periodic table, and knowledge of the patterns of chemical properties.
  • Provide an explanation about the effects of changing the temperature or concentration of the reacting particles on the rate at which a reaction occurs.
  • Use mathematical representations to support the claim that atoms, and therefore mass, are conserved during a chemical reaction.

 

Social Studies

Students explore the historical development of people, places, and patterns of life from ancient times in terms of the impact on Western civilization. The study of history rests on knowledge of dates, names, places, events, and ideas. Historical understanding, however, requires students to engage in historical thinking, raise questions, and marshal evidence in support of their answers. These skills are developed through the study of significant historical substance from the era or society being studied.

The standards enable students to examine history and geography with emphasis on development of the modern world. .Students engaged in historical thinking draw upon chronological thinking, historical comprehension, historical analysis and interpretation, historical research, and decision making.

Students will apply these social science skills to engage in their exploration of the global challenges of the twenty-first century.

By the end of Grade 9, students are expected to:

  • Apply social science skills to understand Western Europe during the Middle Ages from about 500 to 1000 A.D. in terms of its impact on Western civilization.
  • Apply social science skills to understand the social, economic, and political changes and cultural achievements in the high and late medieval periods.
  • Apply social science skills to understand the developments leading to the Renaissance in Europe in terms of its impact on Western civilization.
  • Apply social science skills to understand the impact of the European Age of Exploration.
  • Apply social science skills to understand the political, cultural, geographic, and economic conditions in Europe and Russia from about 1500 A.D. to about 1800 A.D.
  • Apply social science skills to understand the changes in European nations between 1800 and 1900.
  • Apply social science skills to understand World War I and II and its worldwide impact.
  • Apply social science skills to understand the conflicts during the second half of the twentieth century.
  • Apply social science skills to understand the political, economic, social, and cultural aspects of independence movements and development efforts.
  • Apply social science skills to understand the global changes during the early twenty-first century.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the influence of Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, and Hinduism in the contemporary world.

 

Computer

During high school, students gain proficiency of programs which they may utilize in their professional and personal lives. Depending on their grade level and their major, students gain skills in a number of curriculums. Students who study MS-Visual Studio learn the basic concepts of programming from typing blocks of codes to running simple programs of their own design. Students master advanced programs in animation such as Adobe Flash and learn coding to enhance the quality of animating objects.  Students are introduced to HTML Coding to learn the fundamentals of how websites are constructed and run. Students learn Digital Arts using the Adobe Package of Illustrator: InDesign Photoshop.  They produce professional Digital Art Products which is beneficial for students who will later major in applied arts. Students learn multimedia using the Adobe Package of Premiere , After Effect, and  Audition.  Students in grade twelve may choose between learning Auto Desk Package which is AutoCAD 2D -3D and 3D MAX or programming  depending on what they would like to major in later on in university.

By the end of Grade 9, students are expected to:

  • Gain proficiency in Visual Basic.Net, Flash Program and HTML Language.
  • Learn programming using MS Visual Basic.Net to create simple programs.
  • Create multiple types of animation, cartoon movies, stories professionally by using Adobe Flash.
  • Learn the basic of creating web sites by writing the Tags (Commands) of HTML Language.
  • You should be using this proficiency to complete projects and coursework for other subjects.

 

French

In the High school French course, students are able to exchange and support opinions on more complex topics in French. They comprehend spoken and written texts from variety of authentic sources as well as produce compositions containing well-developed ideas on various topics. This course is based on Virginia Standards for French language FIV aligned with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages DELF A2 junior.

By the end of Grade 9, students are expected to:

  • Use a wide range of vocabulary, structures, and major time frames.
  • Exchange ideas clearly, based on level-appropriate themes.
  • Identify various literary elements, such as plot, theme, setting, and characters, in spoken and written texts.
  • Present well-developed ideas on a variety of topics, using familiar vocabulary and language structures and with minimal errors in spelling, punctuation, and pronunciation.

 

German

In the High School German course, students are able to exchange and support opinions on more complex topics in German. They comprehend spoken and written texts from a variety of authentic sources as well as produce compositions containing well-developed ideas on various topics. This course is based on Virginia Standards for German language aligned with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

By the end of Grade 9, students are expected to:

  • Understand the main points of clear standard input on familiar matters regularly encountered in work, school, leisure, etc.
  • Deal with most situations likely to arise whilst travelling in an area where the language is spoken.
  • Produce simple connected text on topics which are familiar or of personal interest.
  • Describe experiences and events, dreams, hopes and ambitions and briefly give reasons and explanations for opinions and plans.

 

Art

Student develop the ability to recognize visual arts content, concepts, and skills needed to create, discuss, and understand original works of art. Students use art-making processes to communicate ideas and personal life experiences. They maintain portfolios documenting their artistic growth. They select representative work to take to the next level of study.

By the end of Grade 9, students are expected to:

  • Maintain and use a process art portfolio (e.g., sketchbook/journal and working portfolio) for planning and as a resource in the art-making process.
  • Identify and use steps of the design process, including brainstorming, preliminary sketching, planning, reflecting, refining, elaborating, and researching, in creative problem solving.
  • Communicate ideas in works of art by identifying and using steps of an artistic process, including selecting media and incorporating elements of art and principles of design.
  • Describe and demonstrate craftsmanship (artisanship) in works of art.

 

Physical Education

Students complete the transition from modified versions of movement forms to more complex applications across all types of physical activities. This may include outdoor pursuits, fitness activities, dance and rhythmic activities, aquatics, individual performance activities, and games and sports (net/wall, striking/fielding, and goal/target). Students demonstrate the ability to use basic skills, strategies, and tactics in a variety of lifetime physical activities.. They apply their understanding of personal fitness to lifelong participation in physical activity. Students demonstrate independence in making choices, respecting others, avoiding conflict, resolving conflicts appropriately, and using elements of fair play and ethical behavior in physical activity settings. Students demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and abilities required to plan for and improve components of fitness and achieve and maintain a health-enhancing level of personal fitness.

By the end of Grade 9, students are expected to:

  • Design, implement, evaluate, and modify a ­practice plan for a self-selected skill, to include ­the motor learning process of analysis of performance; application of principles of movement and training; goal setting; and improvement of personal skills through practice, correction, practicing at a higher level, and reassessment.
  • Apply the concepts and principles of levers, force, motion, and rotation in a variety of activities.
  • Apply physiological principles of warm-up, cool down, overload, specificity, and progression.
  • Apply biomechanical principles of balance, energy, and types of muscle contractions to a variety of activities.
  • Demonstrate competency in one or more specialized skills in health-related fitness activities.

 

Music

During the high school years, students focus on Theory. They integrate aspects of melody, harmony, rhythm, form, analysis, and composition. Emphasis is placed on reading and writing musical notation, developing aural skills such as listening and taking dictation, sight-singing, and using the keyboard. Students recognize, describe, and apply the basic materials and processes of music through an integrated approach, which includes aural, written, creative, and analytical components. Students address these basic concepts by listening to and analyzing a wide variety of music, including standard Western tonal music, contemporary art music, jazz, popular music, and world music. Students use critical-thinking skills to study musical concepts.

By the end of high school students are expected to:

  • Echo, read, and notate music, rhythms, and rhythmic patterns.
  • Identify, read, compare, contrast, and perform music.
  • Identify and notate key signatures of scales and literature being performed
  • Identify, compare, contrast, and perform music written in sonata
  • Use music composition as a means of expression
  • Define and apply music terminology found in the music.
  • Explore historical and cultural aspects of music.
  • Analyze and evaluate music.
  • Investigate aesthetic concepts related to music.

English

The High School English Language Arts curriculum is aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The English Language Arts course provides a balance of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language cumulative skills essential for success in the 21st Century. This course is designed to extend the range of oral communication, reading, writing, and media literacy skills that students need. Students interpret, analyze, compare, and evaluate a variety of literary, informational and graphic texts. Students compose a variety of genres at increasing levels of difficulty each year and learn to use and adjust language in all writing tasks to best communicate ideas, content, and message to readers. They use organizational skills, audience awareness, and both verbal and nonverbal presentation skills to plan and deliver effective oral presentations. Students show mastery of the conventions of academic language.

By the end of Grade 10, students are expected to:

  • Interpret, analyze, and evaluate narratives, poetry, and drama artistically and ethically by making connections to other texts, ideas, cultural perspectives, eras, personal events and situations.
  • Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning.
  • Write arguments to support claims, using valid reasoning and sufficient evidence, informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, and narratives using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.
  • Use technology strategically to create, refine, and update individual or shared writing products and present the relationships between information and ideas efficiently as well as to interact and collaborate with others.
  • Conduct more sustained research projects to solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
  • Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English appropriate to a tenth grade level.
  • Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions and with diverse partners on grade 10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating a command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.

 

Mathematics

In High school we are following Common Core standards for Math, which aim to create a more standardized math curriculum across the country. The Common Core standards state that six content categories should be covered in high school math classes are algebra, functions, modeling, geometry, statistics, and probability. The typical order of math classes in high school is as follows: algebra 1 and geometry in grade 9, algebra 2/trigonometry in grade 10, Pre-Calculus in grade 11, calculus and statistics in grade 12.

By the end of Grade 10, students are expected to:

  • Perform operations using functions, with special emphasis on linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, radical, and rational functions.
  • Learn to represent functions in multiple ways – as verbal description, equations, tables, and graphs.
  • Learn to model real-world situations using functions in order to solve problems arising from those situations. Construct and compare linear and exponential models and solve problems.
  • Interpret expressions for functions in terms of the situation they model.
  • Work on probability and data analysis as well as numerous examples and exercises involving interpreting data. Summarize, represent, and interpret data on two categorical and quantitative variables.
  • Understand and evaluate random processes underlying statistical experiments
  • Make inferences and justify conclusions from sample surveys, experiments and observational studies.
  • Increase their knowledge about Geometry topics such as similarity cases in triangles, surface area and volume of 3-d figures.

 

Science

During grades nine to twelve, students begin to form deeper connections between concepts and skills previously learned such as applying statistics to scientific questions, evaluating limitations of models, and creating algorithms to solve problems. Students learn how to analyze major global challenges, design a solution to a complex real- world problem by breaking it down into smaller and more manageable problems that can be solved through engineering, and to evaluate solutions and then model the impact of the proposed solutions.

By the end of the Biology course, Grade 10 students are expected to:

  • Develop and use a model to illustrate the hierarchical organization of interacting systems that provide specific functions within multi-cellular organisms and provide evidence that feedback mechanisms maintain homeostasis.
  • Construct and revise an explanation based on evidence for how carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen from sugar molecules may combine with other elements to form amino acids and/or other large carbon-based molecules.
  • Ask questions to clarify relationships about the role of DNA and chromosomes in coding the instructions for characteristic traits passed from parents to offspring.
  • Evaluate the claims, evidence, and reasoning that the complex interactions in ecosystems maintain relatively consistent numbers and types of organisms in stable conditions, but changing conditions may result in a new ecosystem.
  • Design, evaluate, and refine a solution for reducing the impacts of human activities on the environment and biodiversity.

 

Social Studies

Students explore the historical development of people, places, and patterns of life from ancient times in terms of the impact on Western civilization. The study of history rests on knowledge of dates, names, places, events, and ideas. Historical understanding, however, requires students to engage in historical thinking, raise questions, and marshal evidence in support of their answers. These skills are developed through the study of significant historical substance from the era or society being studied.

The standards enable students to examine history and geography with emphasis on development of the modern world. .Students engaged in historical thinking draw upon chronological thinking, historical comprehension, historical analysis and interpretation, historical research, and decision making.

Students will apply these social science skills to engage in their exploration of the global challenges of the twenty-first century.

By the end of Grade 10, students are expected to:

  • Demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship.
  • Analyze how physical and ecological processes shape Earth’s surface.
  • Apply the concept of a region.
  • Apply social science skills to evaluate the significance of natural, human, and capital resources.
  • Analyze the characteristics of the Latin American and Caribbean regions.
  • Analyze the characteristics of the Russian and Central Asian regions.
  • Apply social science skills to compare and contrast the distribution, growth rates, and characteristics of human population.
  • Apply social science skills to analyze the patterns of urban development.
  • Apply social science skills to analyze how forces of conflict and cooperation affect the division and control of Earth’s surface.

 

Computer

During high school, students gain proficiency of programs which they may utilize in their professional and personal lives. Depending on their grade level and their major, students gain skills in a number of curriculums. Students who study MS-Visual Studio learn the basic concepts of programming from typing blocks of codes to running simple programs of their own design. Students master advanced programs in animation such as Adobe Flash and learn coding to enhance the quality of animating objects.  Students are introduced to HTML Coding to learn the fundamentals of how websites are constructed and run. Students learn Digital Arts using the Adobe Package of Illustrator: InDesign Photoshop.  They produce professional Digital Art Products which is beneficial for students who will later major in applied arts. Students learn multimedia using the Adobe Package of Premiere , After Effect, and  Audition.  Students in grade twelve may choose between learning Auto Desk Package which is AutoCAD 2D -3D and 3D MAX or programming  depending on what they would like to major in later on in university.

By the end of Grade 10, students are expected to:

  • Master photo editing and designing using Adobe Photoshop.
  • Create multiple types of publications in a professional way by using Adobe InDesign.
  • Master designing and editing Vector Images using Adobe Illustrator.
  • Learn animation and video editing by using Cyberlink Power Director.

 

French

In the High school French course, students are able to exchange and support opinions on more complex topics in French. They comprehend spoken and written texts from variety of authentic sources as well as produce compositions containing well-developed ideas on various topics. This course is based on Virginia Standards for French language FIV aligned with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages DELF A2 junior.

By the end of Grade 10, students are expected to:

  • Understand phrases and the highest frequency vocabulary related to areas of most immediate personal relevance.
  • Read very short, simple texts and find specific, predictable information in simple everyday material.
  • Communicate in simple and routine tasks requiring a simple and direct exchange of information on familiar topics and activities.
  • Write short, simple notes and messages relating to matters in areas of immediate need.

 

German

In the High School German course, students are able to exchange and support opinions on more complex topics in German. They comprehend spoken and written texts from a variety of authentic sources as well as produce compositions containing well-developed ideas on various topics. This course is based on Virginia Standards for German language aligned with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

By the end of Grade 10, students are expected to:

  • Develop their communicative competence by interacting orally and in writing with other German speakers
  • Understand oral and written messages in German, and making oral and written presentations in German.
  • Communicate on a variety of topics at a level commensurate with their study, using more complex structures in German and moving from concrete to more abstract concepts.

 

Art

Student develop the ability to recognize visual arts content, concepts, and skills needed to create, discuss, and understand original works of art. Students use art-making processes to communicate ideas and personal life experiences. They maintain portfolios documenting their artistic growth. They select representative work to take to the next level of study.

By the end of Grade 10, students are expected to:

  • Adhere to ethical choices when creating works of art and design.
  • Select and apply elements of art and principles of design to communicate meaning in works of art.
  • Combine a variety of perspective techniques, including one-point perspective, to create the illusion of space within works of art.
  • Use a variety of drawing media and processes to create observational and expressive works of art.

 

Physical Education

Students complete the transition from modified versions of movement forms to more complex applications across all types of physical activities. This may include outdoor pursuits, fitness activities, dance and rhythmic activities, aquatics, individual performance activities, and games and sports (net/wall, striking/fielding, and goal/target). Students demonstrate the ability to use basic skills, strategies, and tactics in a variety of lifetime physical activities.. They apply their understanding of personal fitness to lifelong participation in physical activity. Students demonstrate independence in making choices, respecting others, avoiding conflict, resolving conflicts appropriately, and using elements of fair play and ethical behavior in physical activity settings. Students demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and abilities required to plan for and improve components of fitness and achieve and maintain a health-enhancing level of personal fitness.

By the end of Grade 10, students are expected to:

  • Analyze movement activities for component skills and movement patterns for one or more lifetime activities.
  • Identify and explain the relationship of opposing muscle groups (agonist/antagonist).
  • Design and implement a program for strength and conditioning.
  • Explain why blood pressure is an indicator of personal health.
  • Apply rate of perceived exertion (RPE) and pacing to a conditioning plan that meets the needs of one or more lifetime activities.

 

Music

During the high school years, students focus on Theory. They integrate aspects of melody, harmony, rhythm, form, analysis, and composition. Emphasis is placed on reading and writing musical notation, developing aural skills such as listening and taking dictation, sight-singing, and using the keyboard. Students recognize, describe, and apply the basic materials and processes of music through an integrated approach, which includes aural, written, creative, and analytical components. Students address these basic concepts by listening to and analyzing a wide variety of music, including standard Western tonal music, contemporary art music, jazz, popular music, and world music. Students use critical-thinking skills to study musical concepts.

By the end of high school students are expected to:

  • Echo, read, and notate music, rhythms, and rhythmic patterns.
  • Identify, read, compare, contrast, and perform music.
  • Identify and notate key signatures of scales and literature being performed
  • Identify, compare, contrast, and perform music written in sonata
  • Use music composition as a means of expression
  • Define and apply music terminology found in the music.
  • Explore historical and cultural aspects of music.
  • Analyze and evaluate music.
  • Investigate aesthetic concepts related to music.

English

The High School English Language Arts curriculum is aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The English Language Arts course provides a balance of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language cumulative skills essential for success in the 21st Century. This course is designed to extend the range of oral communication, reading, writing, and media literacy skills that students need. Students interpret, analyze, compare, and evaluate a variety of literary, informational and graphic texts. Students compose a variety of genres at increasing levels of difficulty each year and learn to use and adjust language in all writing tasks to best communicate ideas, content, and message to readers. They use organizational skills, audience awareness, and both verbal and nonverbal presentation skills to plan and deliver effective oral presentations. Students show mastery of the conventions of academic language.

By the end of Grade 11, students are expected to:

  • Interpret, analyze, and evaluate narratives, poetry, and drama artistically and ethically by making connections to other texts, ideas, cultural perspectives, eras, personal events and situations.
  • Analyze foundational U.S. documents of historical and literary significance for their themes, purposes, and rhetorical features.
  • Use narrative strategies within argument and explanation within narrative to produce complex and nuanced writing.
  • Use technology strategically to create, refine, and update individual or shared writing products and present the relationships between information and ideas efficiently as well as to interact and collaborate with others.
  • Conduct more sustained research projects to solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
  • Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.
  • Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions and with diverse partners on grade 11 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • Present information, findings, and supporting evidence, conveying a clear and distinct perspective, such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning, alternative or opposing perspectives are addressed, and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and a range of formal and informal tasks.

 

Mathematics

In High school we are following Common Core standards for Math, which aim to create a more standardized math curriculum across the country. The Common Core standards state that six content categories should be covered in high school math classes are algebra, functions, modeling, geometry, statistics, and probability. The typical order of math classes in high school is as follows: algebra 1 and geometry in grade 9, algebra 2/trigonometry in grade 10, Pre-Calculus in grade 11, calculus and statistics in grade 12.

By the end of Grade 11, students are expected to:

  • Understand independence and conditional probability and use them to interpret data.
  • Use the rules of probability to compute probabilities of compound events in a uniform probability model.
  • Use probability to evaluate outcomes of decisions.
  • Have deep understanding of all kinds of functions and their real life application.
  • Be able to perform limits and their applications.
  • Calculate expected values and use them to solve problems.

 

Science

During grades nine to twelve, students begin to form deeper connections between concepts and skills previously learned such as applying statistics to scientific questions, evaluating limitations of models, and creating algorithms to solve problems. Students learn how to analyze major global challenges, design a solution to a complex real- world problem by breaking it down into smaller and more manageable problems that can be solved through engineering, and to evaluate solutions and then model the impact of the proposed solutions.

By the end of the Modern Chemistry course, Grade 11 students are expected to:

  • Use the periodic table as a model to predict the relative properties of elements based on the patterns of electrons in the outermost energy level of atoms.
  • Construct and revise an explanation for the outcome of a simple chemical reaction based on the outermost electron states of atoms, trends in the periodic table, and knowledge of the patterns of chemical properties.
  • Develop a model to illustrate that the release or absorption of energy from a chemical reaction system depends upon the changes in total bond energy.
  • Plan and conduct an investigation to provide evidence that the transfer of thermal energy when two components of different temperatures are combined within a closed system results in a more uniform energy distribution among the components in the system (second law of thermodynamics).
  • Develop models to illustrate the changes in the composition of the nucleus of the atom and the energy released during the processes of fission, fusion, and radioactive decay.

 

Social Studies

Students explore the historical context of key developments that shaped the United States, its identity and culture, and its role in the global community.  This course which traces the social, economic, and political development of the United States from colonial times to the present extends student’s ability to apply the concepts of historical thinking and the historical inquiry process, including the interpretation and analysis of evidence, when investigating forces in American history.

By the end of the History course, Grade 11 students are expected to:

  • Demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographic analysis, and economic decision making.
  • Use maps, globes, photographs, pictures, or tables to interpret data.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the effects of Reconstruction on American life.
  • Apply social science skills to understand how life changed after the Civil War; the changing role of the United States from the late nineteenth century through World War I; the social, economic, and technological changes of the early twentieth century; the major causes and effects of American involvement in World War II; e the economic, social, and political transformation of the United States and the world between the end of World War II and the present; and the key domestic and international issues during the second half of the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries

 

Computer

During high school, students gain proficiency of programs which they may utilize in their professional and personal lives. Depending on their grade level and their major, students gain skills in a number of curriculums. Students who study MS-Visual Studio learn the basic concepts of programming from typing blocks of codes to running simple programs of their own design. Students master advanced programs in animation such as Adobe Flash and learn coding to enhance the quality of animating objects.  Students are introduced to HTML Coding to learn the fundamentals of how websites are constructed and run. Students learn Digital Arts using the Adobe Package of Illustrator: InDesign Photoshop.  They produce professional Digital Art Products which is beneficial for students who will later major in applied arts. Students learn multimedia using the Adobe Package of Premiere , After Effect, and  Audition.  Students in grade twelve may choose between learning Auto Desk Package which is AutoCAD 2D -3D and 3D MAX or programming  depending on what they would like to major in later on in university.

By the end of Grade 11, students are expected to:

  • Be proficient in the use of Multimedia.
  • Use different professional programs for video editing and visual effects.
  • Produce documentary movies and short movies as a final project.
  • Use Adobe Audition, Premiere,  After Effect

 

French

In the High school French course, students are able to exchange and support opinions on more complex topics in French. They comprehend spoken and written texts from variety of authentic sources as well as produce compositions containing well-developed ideas on various topics. This course is based on Virginia Standards for French language FIV aligned with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages DELF A2 junior.

By the end of Grade 11, students are expected to:

  • Understand the essential information from short, recorded passages dealing with predictable everyday matters which are delivered slowly and clearly.
  • Understand short, simple texts containing the highest frequency vocabulary, including a proportion of shared international vocabulary items.
  • Interact with reasonable ease in structured situations and short conversations, provided the other person helps if necessary.
  • Write a very simple personal letter, for example thanking someone for something.
  • Identify the main point of TV news items reporting events, accidents etc. where the visual supports the commentary.

 

German

In the High School German course, students are able to exchange and support opinions on more complex topics in German. They comprehend spoken and written texts from a variety of authentic sources as well as produce compositions containing well-developed ideas on various topics. This course is based on Virginia Standards for German language aligned with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

By the end of Grade 11, students are expected to:

  • Understand the main points of clear standard speech on familiar matters regularly encountered in work, school, leisure, etc.
  • Understand the main point of many radio or TV programs on current affairs or topics of personal or professional interest when the delivery is relatively slow and clear.
  • Understand texts that consist mainly of high frequency everyday or job related language.
  • Understand the description of events, feelings and wishes in personal letters.
  • Deal with most situations likely to arise whilst travelling in an area where the language is spoken.
  • Connect phrases in a simple way in order to describe experiences and events, his dreams, hopes and ambitions.
  • Write simple connected text on topics which are familiar or of personal interest.
  • Write personal letters describing experiences and impressions.

 

Art

Student develop the ability to recognize visual arts content, concepts, and skills needed to create, discuss, and understand original works of art. Students use art-making processes to communicate ideas and personal life experiences. They maintain portfolios documenting their artistic growth. They select representative work to take to the next level of study.

By the end of Grade 11, students are expected to:

  • Articulate the difference between personal preference and informed judgment when discussing works of art.
  • Describe aesthetic qualities found in works of art.
  • Analyze the functions, purposes, and perceived meanings of works of design.
  • Formulate a definition for art and defend that definition in relation to objects in the world.
  • Use personal criteria when making visual aesthetic judgments.

 

Physical Education

Students complete the transition from modified versions of movement forms to more complex applications across all types of physical activities. This may include outdoor pursuits, fitness activities, dance and rhythmic activities, aquatics, individual performance activities, and games and sports (net/wall, striking/fielding, and goal/target). Students demonstrate the ability to use basic skills, strategies, and tactics in a variety of lifetime physical activities.. They apply their understanding of personal fitness to lifelong participation in physical activity. Students demonstrate independence in making choices, respecting others, avoiding conflict, resolving conflicts appropriately, and using elements of fair play and ethical behavior in physical activity settings. Students demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and abilities required to plan for and improve components of fitness and achieve and maintain a health-enhancing level of personal fitness.

By the end of Grade 11, students are expected to:

  • Participate independently in health-enhancing physical fitness activities.
  • Evaluate and adjust activity levels to meet personal fitness goals.
  • Design and critique a personal fitness program, using available technology and resources.
  • Identify the physical and mental benefits of physical fitness.
  • Maintain a health-enhancing level of physical fitness.

 

Music

During the high school years, students focus on Theory. They integrate aspects of melody, harmony, rhythm, form, analysis, and composition. Emphasis is placed on reading and writing musical notation, developing aural skills such as listening and taking dictation, sight-singing, and using the keyboard. Students recognize, describe, and apply the basic materials and processes of music through an integrated approach, which includes aural, written, creative, and analytical components. Students address these basic concepts by listening to and analyzing a wide variety of music, including standard Western tonal music, contemporary art music, jazz, popular music, and world music. Students use critical-thinking skills to study musical concepts.

By the end of high school students are expected to:

  • Echo, read, and notate music, rhythms, and rhythmic patterns.
  • Identify, read, compare, contrast, and perform music.
  • Identify and notate key signatures of scales and literature being performed
  • Identify, compare, contrast, and perform music written in sonata
  • Use music composition as a means of expression
  • Define and apply music terminology found in the music.
  • Explore historical and cultural aspects of music.
  • Analyze and evaluate music.
  • Investigate aesthetic concepts related to music.

English

The High School English Language Arts curriculum is aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The English Language Arts course provides a balance of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language cumulative skills essential for success in the 21st Century. This course is designed to extend the range of oral communication, reading, writing, and media literacy skills that students need. Students interpret, analyze, compare, and evaluate a variety of literary, informational and graphic texts. Students compose a variety of genres at increasing levels of difficulty each year and learn to use and adjust language in all writing tasks to best communicate ideas, content, and message to readers. They use organizational skills, audience awareness, and both verbal and nonverbal presentation skills to plan and deliver effective oral presentations. Students show mastery of the conventions of academic language.

By the end of Grade 12, students are expected to:

  • Read, analyze, and evaluate a wide variety of print (fiction, nonfiction, drama, and poetry/lyrics), and visual/multimedia texts (e.g., film, journalism, television, advertising, music videos, social media).
  • Write a range of complex texts for a variety of audiences and purposes (expressive, persuasive, persuasive research, visual/multimedia, and creative multi -genre collection) using a range of strategies to enhance clarity, precision, and effectiveness.
  • Use technology strategically to create, refine, and update individual or shared writing products and present the relationships between information and ideas efficiently as well as to interact and collaborate with others.
  • Conduct more sustained research projects to solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
  • Apply knowledge of grammar, language conventions and structure to effectively communicate through written expression.
  • Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions and with diverse partners on grade 12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.

 

Mathematics

In High school we are following Common Core standards for Math, which aim to create a more standardized math curriculum across the country. The Common Core standards state that six content categories should be covered in high school math classes are Algebra, Functions, Modeling, Geometry, Statistics, and Probability. The typical order of math classes in high school is as follows: Algebra 1 and Geometry in grade 9, Algebra 2/Trigonometry in grade 10, Pre-Calculus in grade 11, Calculus and Statistics in grade 12.

By the end of Grade 12, students are expected to:

  • Be able to perform limits problems and their applications.
  • Perform differentiation and Integration with their different kinds and their applications as well.
  • Apply different statistical concepts and put them in use in real life.
  • Be able to perform problems related to mechanics and apply them to real life situations.

 

Science

During grades nine to twelve, students begin to form deeper connections between concepts and skills previously learned such as applying statistics to scientific questions, evaluating limitations of models, and creating algorithms to solve problems. Students learn how to analyze major global challenges, design a solution to a complex real- world problem by breaking it down into smaller and more manageable problems that can be solved through engineering, and to evaluate solutions and then model the impact of the proposed solutions.

By the end of the Advanced Biology course, Grade 12 students are expected to:

  • Communicate scientific information about how different body systems provide specific functions to maintain homeostasis within multi-cellular organisms.
  • Use a model to illustrate how photosynthesis transforms light energy into stored chemical energy, and how cellular respiration is a chemical process whereby the bonds of food molecules and oxygen molecules are broken, and the bonds in new compounds are formed resulting in a net transfer of energy.
  • Communicate scientific information that common ancestry and biological evolution are supported by multiple lines of empirical evidence, and how natural selection leads to adaptation of populations.

By the end of the Environmental Science course, Grade 12 students are expected to:

  • Analyze a major global challenge to specify qualitative and quantitative criteria and constraints for solutions that account for societal needs and wants.
  • Construct an explanation based on evidence for how the availability of natural resources, occurrence of natural hazards, and changes in climate have influenced human activity
  • Develop a model to illustrate the components of the biosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and geo-sphere and analyze geo-scientific data to make the claim that one change to Earth’s surface can create feedbacks that cause changes to other Earth systems.
  • Illustrate the relationships among the management of natural resources, the sustainability of human populations, and biodiversity, then design, evaluate, and refine a solution for reducing the impacts of human activities on the environment and biodiversity.
  • Evaluate major contributions by developing technologies that produce less pollution and waste and that preclude ecosystem degradation.

By the end of the Physics course, Grade 12 students are expected to:

  • Recognize linear relationship between displacement and time from graphed data. Where appropriate, draw a straight line through a set of experimental data points and determine the slope and/or area under the curve.
  • Analyze acceleration and falling objects’ motion using graphs and kinematic equations.
  • Combine and resolve vectors utilizing trigonometric or graphical methods. Draw vector diagrams of a projectile’s motion. Find range, trajectory, height of the projectile, and time of flight (uniform gravitational field, no air resistance).
  • Analyze data to support the claim that Newton’s second law of motion describes the mathematical relationship among the net force on a macroscopic object, its mass, and its acceleration.
  • Provide and explain examples of how energy can be converted from potential energy to kinetic energy and the reverse and create a model to calculate the change in the energy of one component in a system when the change in energy of the other component(s) and energy flows in and out of the system are known.

 

Social Studies

Egyptian History (Non-Scientific)

Students study Ancient Egypt, which was one of the longest-lasting civilizations the world has ever known.  Students explore Egypt’s broad political, economic, social, and cultural developments, from the mighty civilization of the past to the diverse cultural and political landscape, covering almost 6,000 years of history.

By the end of the Egyptian History course, Grade 12 students (Non-scientific) are expected to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of the Egyptian geography, traditions and culture, the time-line of the ancient Egyptian’s history, the periods of glory and decline emphasizing on the reasons and consequences, and the reasons that led to the rise of the Mamluks and the Ottoman occupation.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the effects of the Industrial Revolution during the nineteenth century, the British Occupation during the nineteenth century.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the effects of Demonstrate knowledge of the struggle for independence during the twentieth Century, the roots of the Palestinian dilemma, transformations and change in internal and external politics in post-colonial Egypt.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of political, economic, social, and cultural aspects of the Sadat era and contemporary Egypt.

 

Psychology (Elective)

Students study psychology which is defined as “the study of the mind and behavior. The discipline embraces all aspects of the human experience—from the functions of the brain to the actions of nations, from child development to care for the aged. . . In every conceivable setting . . . ‘the understanding of behavior’ is the enterprise of psychologists.” Students gain a general understanding of psychology by integrating thinking skills, scientific processes, and content so that they are able to apply their learning to their own lives. Students learn about concepts they talk about and live from a psychological academic point of view including stress, intelligence, theories of personality and psychological disorders.

By the end of the Psychology course, Grade 12 students are expected to:

  • Analyze concepts related to the measurement and nature of intelligence.
  • Describe behavioral, social and cognitive changes from the prenatal period throughout the life span.
  • Identify major theories and concepts related to motivation and emotion.
  • Students will evaluate assessment tools and theories in personality.
  • Discuss the components of stress.
  • Identify abnormal behavior and treatment.
  • Analyze the impact of the social environment on behaviors and attitudes

 

Economics (Elective)

Students develop a basic understanding of economic principles in order to gain knowledge in various economics aspects. They study topics which include knowing the effect of supply and demand, an introduction to microeconomics, the importance of government, an introduction to macroeconomics, macro policies and trade, industrial organization and products costs, and market structures, including perfect and imperfect competition.

By the end of the Economics course, Grade 12 students are expected to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of basic economic concepts and structures.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the role of producers and consumers in a market economy.
  • Demonstrate knowledge that many factors affect income.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the price system, a nation’s economic goals, including full employment, stable prices, and economic growth, a nation’s financial system, and how monetary and fiscal policy influence employment, output, and prices.
  • Students will demonstrate knowledge of the global economy, planning for living and leisure expenses, banking transactions, credit and loan functions, the role of insurance in risk management, income earning and reporting, taxes, personal financial planning, and investment and savings planning.

 

Computer

During high school, students gain proficiency of programs which they may utilize in their professional and personal lives. Depending on their grade level and their major, students gain skills in a number of curriculums. Students who study MS-Visual Studio learn the basic concepts of programming from typing blocks of codes to running simple programs of their own design. Students master advanced programs in animation such as Adobe Flash and learn coding to enhance the quality of animating objects.  Students are introduced to HTML Coding to learn the fundamentals of how websites are constructed and run. Students learn Digital Arts using the Adobe Package of Illustrator: InDesign Photoshop.  They produce professional Digital Art Products which is beneficial for students who will later major in applied arts. Students learn multimedia using the Adobe Package of Premiere , After Effect, and  Audition.  Students in grade twelve may choose between learning Auto Desk Package which is AutoCAD 2D -3D and 3D MAX or programming  depending on what they would like to major in later on in university.

By the end of the Architecture course (Elective), Grade 12 students are expected to:

  • Apply the main skills of architecture designs
  • Learn how to do a plan design using the AutoCAD Application and converting the plan to a 3D object by using Autodesk 3D MAX Application.
  • Comprehend different plan perspectives such as the top –front –back – right view.
  • Render a virtual reality scene using 3D render.
  • Use Adobe Photo Shop for landscape details and internal decoration for apartments.

By the end of the Programming course (Elective), Grade 12 students are expected to:

  • Learn the main skills and basics of programming languages.
  • Use different professional programs for learning programming.
  • Use C++/ C#/ Java/Python.
  • Gain proficiency of oriented programming and number system conversion.

 

Art

Student develop the ability to recognize visual arts content, concepts, and skills needed to create, discuss, and understand original works of art. Students use art-making processes to communicate ideas and personal life experiences. They maintain portfolios documenting their artistic growth. They select representative work to take to the next level of study.

By the end of Grade 12, students are expected to:

  • Analyze major art movements and influential artists according to events, places, cultures, and historical periods.
  • Identify technological developments in the visual arts.
  • Analyze works of art as representational, abstract, or nonrepresentational, including nonobjective and conceptual.
  • Describe how the design process is used in various careers

 

Physical Education

Students complete the transition from modified versions of movement forms to more complex applications across all types of physical activities. This may include outdoor pursuits, fitness activities, dance and rhythmic activities, aquatics, individual performance activities, and games and sports (net/wall, striking/fielding, and goal/target). Students demonstrate the ability to use basic skills, strategies, and tactics in a variety of lifetime physical activities.. They apply their understanding of personal fitness to lifelong participation in physical activity. Students demonstrate independence in making choices, respecting others, avoiding conflict, resolving conflicts appropriately, and using elements of fair play and ethical behavior in physical activity settings. Students demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and abilities required to plan for and improve components of fitness and achieve and maintain a health-enhancing level of personal fitness.

By the end of Grade 12, students are expected to:

  • Exhibit a level of proficiency in all basic skills required for the selected activity and the ability to use the skills with consistency in the appropriate setting.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the rules and strategies of the selected activity, and apply them appropriately.
  • Explain and apply selected scientific principles (e.g., physiological, biomechanical) that aid in the improvement of skills and performance in specialized movement forms.
  • Integrate movement principles and concepts in order to analyze and improve the performance of self and others in specialized movement forms

 

Music

During the high school years, students focus on Theory. They integrate aspects of melody, harmony, rhythm, form, analysis, and composition. Emphasis is placed on reading and writing musical notation, developing aural skills such as listening and taking dictation, sight-singing, and using the keyboard. Students recognize, describe, and apply the basic materials and processes of music through an integrated approach, which includes aural, written, creative, and analytical components. Students address these basic concepts by listening to and analyzing a wide variety of music, including standard Western tonal music, contemporary art music, jazz, popular music, and world music. Students use critical-thinking skills to study musical concepts.

By the end of high school students are expected to:

  • Echo, read, and notate music, rhythms, and rhythmic patterns.
  • Identify, read, compare, contrast, and perform music.
  • Identify and notate key signatures of scales and literature being performed
  • Identify, compare, contrast, and perform music written in sonata
  • Use music composition as a means of expression
  • Define and apply music terminology found in the music.
  • Explore historical and cultural aspects of music.
  • Analyze and evaluate music.
  • Investigate aesthetic concepts related to music.

Course Selection for Grade 12

Grade 12 is a critical year for our students. It is a time when students solidify and reinforce study habits as well as expand their knowledge and skills. It is also a time when students select a study stream in scientific or non scientific areas of course content. Each student and family will need to examine these two areas and be prepared to select a package for their child’s grade 12 year. It is important to choose wisely since study streams cannot be changed once a student begins in a particular area.

All students take the common subjects. Students must choose between scientific and non-scientific packages.

Scientific

Non- Scientific

Common Subjects

Physics, Calculus,Advanced Biology

Environmental Science, Advanced Math, Egyptian History

English, Psychology, Economics, Art/Music/P.E Arabic, Religion

Graduation Requirements

DAIS requires a minimum of 24 High School units of credit, taken over eight semesters in Grades 9 through to 12 inclusively to graduate. The courses listed below are required to achieve graduation at the High School level.  A credit is defined in adherence to Carnegie credit hour standards.   The minimum requirement for graduation is a (C) average (2.00 GPA) overall.

Required Courses

Students must complete the following courses successfully to graduate:

Courses

Requirements

English

4 Credits

Mathematics

4 Credits

Science

4 Credits

Social Studies

4 Credits

Physical Education

2 Credits

Art/Music

2 Credits

World Languages

3 Credits

Arabic Language

4 Credits (Unless Exempted)

Technology

2.5 Credits

Electives

2 Credits

Any course taken beyond the number of units required in a given subject area is regarded as an elective in that subject area.

English

The High School English Language Arts curriculum is aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The English Language Arts course provides a balance of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language cumulative skills essential for success in the 21st Century. This course is designed to extend the range of oral communication, reading, writing, and media literacy skills that students need. Students interpret, analyze, compare, and evaluate a variety of literary, informational and graphic texts. Students compose a variety of genres at increasing levels of difficulty each year and learn to use and adjust language in all writing tasks to best communicate ideas, content, and message to readers. They use organizational skills, audience awareness, and both verbal and nonverbal presentation skills to plan and deliver effective oral presentations. Students show mastery of the conventions of academic language.

By the end of Grade 9, students are expected to:

  • Analyze, and evaluate narratives, poetry, and drama by making connections to other texts, ideas, cultural perspectives, eras, personal events and situations.
  • Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses rhetoric to advance that point of view or purpose.
  • Write clear and coherent arguments, informative/explanatory, and narratives in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
  • Strengthen writing by planning, revising, editing, and rewriting.
  • Use technology, including the internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products and present the relationships between information and ideas efficiently as well as to interact and collaborate with others.
  • Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
  • Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions and with diverse partners on grade 9 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.

 

Mathematics

In High school we are following Common Core standards for Math, which aim to create a more standardized math curriculum across the country. The Common Core standards state that six content categories should be covered in high school math classes are algebra, functions, modeling, geometry, statistics, and probability. The typical order of math classes in high school is as follows: algebra 1 and geometry in grade 9, algebra 2/trigonometry in grade 10, Pre-Calculus in grade 11, calculus and statistics in grade 12.

By the end of Grade 9, students are expected to:

  • Perform operations using functions, with special emphasis on linear functions. Learn to represent them in multiple ways – as verbal description, equations, inequalities, tables, and graphs.
  • Model real-world situations using functions in order to solve problems arising from those situations.
  • Work using probability and data analysis and interpret them into understandable situations. Use the rules of probability to compute probabilities of compound events in a uniform probability model.
  • Summarize, represent, and interpret data on a single count or measurement variable.

 

Science

During grades nine to twelve, students begin to form deeper connections between concepts and skills previously learned such as applying statistics to scientific questions, evaluating limitations of models, and creating algorithms to solve problems. Students learn how to analyze major global challenges, design a solution to a complex real- world problem by breaking it down into smaller and more manageable problems that can be solved through engineering, and to evaluate solutions and then model the impact of the proposed solutions.

By the end of the Physical Science course, Grade 9 students are expected to:

  • Plan and conduct an investigation to provide evidence that an electric current can produce a magnetic field and that a changing magnetic field can produce an electric current.
  • Analyze data to support the claim that Newton’s second law of motion describes the mathematical relationship among the net force on a macroscopic object, its mass, and its acceleration.
  • Use mathematical representations to support a claim regarding relationships among the frequency, wavelength, and speed of waves traveling in various media.
  • Use the periodic table as a model to predict the relative properties of elements based on the patterns of electrons in the outermost energy level of atoms.
  • Construct and revise an explanation for the outcome of a simple chemical reaction based on the outermost electron states of atoms, trends in the periodic table, and knowledge of the patterns of chemical properties.
  • Provide an explanation about the effects of changing the temperature or concentration of the reacting particles on the rate at which a reaction occurs.
  • Use mathematical representations to support the claim that atoms, and therefore mass, are conserved during a chemical reaction.

 

Social Studies

Students explore the historical development of people, places, and patterns of life from ancient times in terms of the impact on Western civilization. The study of history rests on knowledge of dates, names, places, events, and ideas. Historical understanding, however, requires students to engage in historical thinking, raise questions, and marshal evidence in support of their answers. These skills are developed through the study of significant historical substance from the era or society being studied.

The standards enable students to examine history and geography with emphasis on development of the modern world. .Students engaged in historical thinking draw upon chronological thinking, historical comprehension, historical analysis and interpretation, historical research, and decision making.

Students will apply these social science skills to engage in their exploration of the global challenges of the twenty-first century.

By the end of Grade 9, students are expected to:

  • Apply social science skills to understand Western Europe during the Middle Ages from about 500 to 1000 A.D. in terms of its impact on Western civilization.
  • Apply social science skills to understand the social, economic, and political changes and cultural achievements in the high and late medieval periods.
  • Apply social science skills to understand the developments leading to the Renaissance in Europe in terms of its impact on Western civilization.
  • Apply social science skills to understand the impact of the European Age of Exploration.
  • Apply social science skills to understand the political, cultural, geographic, and economic conditions in Europe and Russia from about 1500 A.D. to about 1800 A.D.
  • Apply social science skills to understand the changes in European nations between 1800 and 1900.
  • Apply social science skills to understand World War I and II and its worldwide impact.
  • Apply social science skills to understand the conflicts during the second half of the twentieth century.
  • Apply social science skills to understand the political, economic, social, and cultural aspects of independence movements and development efforts.
  • Apply social science skills to understand the global changes during the early twenty-first century.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the influence of Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, and Hinduism in the contemporary world.

 

Computer

During high school, students gain proficiency of programs which they may utilize in their professional and personal lives. Depending on their grade level and their major, students gain skills in a number of curriculums. Students who study MS-Visual Studio learn the basic concepts of programming from typing blocks of codes to running simple programs of their own design. Students master advanced programs in animation such as Adobe Flash and learn coding to enhance the quality of animating objects.  Students are introduced to HTML Coding to learn the fundamentals of how websites are constructed and run. Students learn Digital Arts using the Adobe Package of Illustrator: InDesign Photoshop.  They produce professional Digital Art Products which is beneficial for students who will later major in applied arts. Students learn multimedia using the Adobe Package of Premiere , After Effect, and  Audition.  Students in grade twelve may choose between learning Auto Desk Package which is AutoCAD 2D -3D and 3D MAX or programming  depending on what they would like to major in later on in university.

By the end of Grade 9, students are expected to:

  • Gain proficiency in Visual Basic.Net, Flash Program and HTML Language.
  • Learn programming using MS Visual Basic.Net to create simple programs.
  • Create multiple types of animation, cartoon movies, stories professionally by using Adobe Flash.
  • Learn the basic of creating web sites by writing the Tags (Commands) of HTML Language.
  • You should be using this proficiency to complete projects and coursework for other subjects.

 

French

In the High school French course, students are able to exchange and support opinions on more complex topics in French. They comprehend spoken and written texts from variety of authentic sources as well as produce compositions containing well-developed ideas on various topics. This course is based on Virginia Standards for French language FIV aligned with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages DELF A2 junior.

By the end of Grade 9, students are expected to:

  • Use a wide range of vocabulary, structures, and major time frames.
  • Exchange ideas clearly, based on level-appropriate themes.
  • Identify various literary elements, such as plot, theme, setting, and characters, in spoken and written texts.
  • Present well-developed ideas on a variety of topics, using familiar vocabulary and language structures and with minimal errors in spelling, punctuation, and pronunciation.

 

German

In the High School German course, students are able to exchange and support opinions on more complex topics in German. They comprehend spoken and written texts from a variety of authentic sources as well as produce compositions containing well-developed ideas on various topics. This course is based on Virginia Standards for German language aligned with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

By the end of Grade 9, students are expected to:

  • Understand the main points of clear standard input on familiar matters regularly encountered in work, school, leisure, etc.
  • Deal with most situations likely to arise whilst travelling in an area where the language is spoken.
  • Produce simple connected text on topics which are familiar or of personal interest.
  • Describe experiences and events, dreams, hopes and ambitions and briefly give reasons and explanations for opinions and plans.

 

Art

Student develop the ability to recognize visual arts content, concepts, and skills needed to create, discuss, and understand original works of art. Students use art-making processes to communicate ideas and personal life experiences. They maintain portfolios documenting their artistic growth. They select representative work to take to the next level of study.

By the end of Grade 9, students are expected to:

  • Maintain and use a process art portfolio (e.g., sketchbook/journal and working portfolio) for planning and as a resource in the art-making process.
  • Identify and use steps of the design process, including brainstorming, preliminary sketching, planning, reflecting, refining, elaborating, and researching, in creative problem solving.
  • Communicate ideas in works of art by identifying and using steps of an artistic process, including selecting media and incorporating elements of art and principles of design.
  • Describe and demonstrate craftsmanship (artisanship) in works of art.

 

Physical Education

Students complete the transition from modified versions of movement forms to more complex applications across all types of physical activities. This may include outdoor pursuits, fitness activities, dance and rhythmic activities, aquatics, individual performance activities, and games and sports (net/wall, striking/fielding, and goal/target). Students demonstrate the ability to use basic skills, strategies, and tactics in a variety of lifetime physical activities.. They apply their understanding of personal fitness to lifelong participation in physical activity. Students demonstrate independence in making choices, respecting others, avoiding conflict, resolving conflicts appropriately, and using elements of fair play and ethical behavior in physical activity settings. Students demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and abilities required to plan for and improve components of fitness and achieve and maintain a health-enhancing level of personal fitness.

By the end of Grade 9, students are expected to:

  • Design, implement, evaluate, and modify a ­practice plan for a self-selected skill, to include ­the motor learning process of analysis of performance; application of principles of movement and training; goal setting; and improvement of personal skills through practice, correction, practicing at a higher level, and reassessment.
  • Apply the concepts and principles of levers, force, motion, and rotation in a variety of activities.
  • Apply physiological principles of warm-up, cool down, overload, specificity, and progression.
  • Apply biomechanical principles of balance, energy, and types of muscle contractions to a variety of activities.
  • Demonstrate competency in one or more specialized skills in health-related fitness activities.

 

Music

During the high school years, students focus on Theory. They integrate aspects of melody, harmony, rhythm, form, analysis, and composition. Emphasis is placed on reading and writing musical notation, developing aural skills such as listening and taking dictation, sight-singing, and using the keyboard. Students recognize, describe, and apply the basic materials and processes of music through an integrated approach, which includes aural, written, creative, and analytical components. Students address these basic concepts by listening to and analyzing a wide variety of music, including standard Western tonal music, contemporary art music, jazz, popular music, and world music. Students use critical-thinking skills to study musical concepts.

By the end of high school students are expected to:

  • Echo, read, and notate music, rhythms, and rhythmic patterns.
  • Identify, read, compare, contrast, and perform music.
  • Identify and notate key signatures of scales and literature being performed
  • Identify, compare, contrast, and perform music written in sonata
  • Use music composition as a means of expression
  • Define and apply music terminology found in the music.
  • Explore historical and cultural aspects of music.
  • Analyze and evaluate music.
  • Investigate aesthetic concepts related to music.

 

English

The High School English Language Arts curriculum is aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The English Language Arts course provides a balance of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language cumulative skills essential for success in the 21st Century. This course is designed to extend the range of oral communication, reading, writing, and media literacy skills that students need. Students interpret, analyze, compare, and evaluate a variety of literary, informational and graphic texts. Students compose a variety of genres at increasing levels of difficulty each year and learn to use and adjust language in all writing tasks to best communicate ideas, content, and message to readers. They use organizational skills, audience awareness, and both verbal and nonverbal presentation skills to plan and deliver effective oral presentations. Students show mastery of the conventions of academic language.

By the end of Grade 10, students are expected to:

  • Interpret, analyze, and evaluate narratives, poetry, and drama artistically and ethically by making connections to other texts, ideas, cultural perspectives, eras, personal events and situations.
  • Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning.
  • Write arguments to support claims, using valid reasoning and sufficient evidence, informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, and narratives using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.
  • Use technology strategically to create, refine, and update individual or shared writing products and present the relationships between information and ideas efficiently as well as to interact and collaborate with others.
  • Conduct more sustained research projects to solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
  • Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English appropriate to a tenth grade level.
  • Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions and with diverse partners on grade 10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating a command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.

 

Mathematics

In High school we are following Common Core standards for Math, which aim to create a more standardized math curriculum across the country. The Common Core standards state that six content categories should be covered in high school math classes are algebra, functions, modeling, geometry, statistics, and probability. The typical order of math classes in high school is as follows: algebra 1 and geometry in grade 9, algebra 2/trigonometry in grade 10, Pre-Calculus in grade 11, calculus and statistics in grade 12.

By the end of Grade 10, students are expected to:

  • Perform operations using functions, with special emphasis on linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, radical, and rational functions.
  • Learn to represent functions in multiple ways – as verbal description, equations, tables, and graphs.
  • Learn to model real-world situations using functions in order to solve problems arising from those situations. Construct and compare linear and exponential models and solve problems.
  • Interpret expressions for functions in terms of the situation they model.
  • Work on probability and data analysis as well as numerous examples and exercises involving interpreting data. Summarize, represent, and interpret data on two categorical and quantitative variables.
  • Understand and evaluate random processes underlying statistical experiments
  • Make inferences and justify conclusions from sample surveys, experiments and observational studies.
  • Increase their knowledge about Geometry topics such as similarity cases in triangles, surface area and volume of 3-d figures.

 

Science

During grades nine to twelve, students begin to form deeper connections between concepts and skills previously learned such as applying statistics to scientific questions, evaluating limitations of models, and creating algorithms to solve problems. Students learn how to analyze major global challenges, design a solution to a complex real- world problem by breaking it down into smaller and more manageable problems that can be solved through engineering, and to evaluate solutions and then model the impact of the proposed solutions.

By the end of the Biology course, Grade 10 students are expected to:

  • Develop and use a model to illustrate the hierarchical organization of interacting systems that provide specific functions within multi-cellular organisms and provide evidence that feedback mechanisms maintain homeostasis.
  • Construct and revise an explanation based on evidence for how carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen from sugar molecules may combine with other elements to form amino acids and/or other large carbon-based molecules.
  • Ask questions to clarify relationships about the role of DNA and chromosomes in coding the instructions for characteristic traits passed from parents to offspring.
  • Evaluate the claims, evidence, and reasoning that the complex interactions in ecosystems maintain relatively consistent numbers and types of organisms in stable conditions, but changing conditions may result in a new ecosystem.
  • Design, evaluate, and refine a solution for reducing the impacts of human activities on the environment and biodiversity.

 

Social Studies

Students explore the historical development of people, places, and patterns of life from ancient times in terms of the impact on Western civilization. The study of history rests on knowledge of dates, names, places, events, and ideas. Historical understanding, however, requires students to engage in historical thinking, raise questions, and marshal evidence in support of their answers. These skills are developed through the study of significant historical substance from the era or society being studied.

The standards enable students to examine history and geography with emphasis on development of the modern world. .Students engaged in historical thinking draw upon chronological thinking, historical comprehension, historical analysis and interpretation, historical research, and decision making.

Students will apply these social science skills to engage in their exploration of the global challenges of the twenty-first century.

By the end of Grade 10, students are expected to:

  • Demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship.
  • Analyze how physical and ecological processes shape Earth’s surface.
  • Apply the concept of a region.
  • Apply social science skills to evaluate the significance of natural, human, and capital resources.
  • Analyze the characteristics of the Latin American and Caribbean regions.
  • Analyze the characteristics of the Russian and Central Asian regions.
  • Apply social science skills to compare and contrast the distribution, growth rates, and characteristics of human population.
  • Apply social science skills to analyze the patterns of urban development.
  • Apply social science skills to analyze how forces of conflict and cooperation affect the division and control of Earth’s surface.

 

Computer

During high school, students gain proficiency of programs which they may utilize in their professional and personal lives. Depending on their grade level and their major, students gain skills in a number of curriculums. Students who study MS-Visual Studio learn the basic concepts of programming from typing blocks of codes to running simple programs of their own design. Students master advanced programs in animation such as Adobe Flash and learn coding to enhance the quality of animating objects.  Students are introduced to HTML Coding to learn the fundamentals of how websites are constructed and run. Students learn Digital Arts using the Adobe Package of Illustrator: InDesign Photoshop.  They produce professional Digital Art Products which is beneficial for students who will later major in applied arts. Students learn multimedia using the Adobe Package of Premiere , After Effect, and  Audition.  Students in grade twelve may choose between learning Auto Desk Package which is AutoCAD 2D -3D and 3D MAX or programming  depending on what they would like to major in later on in university.

By the end of Grade 10, students are expected to:

  • Master photo editing and designing using Adobe Photoshop.
  • Create multiple types of publications in a professional way by using Adobe InDesign.
  • Master designing and editing Vector Images using Adobe Illustrator.
  • Learn animation and video editing by using Cyberlink Power Director.

 

French

In the High school French course, students are able to exchange and support opinions on more complex topics in French. They comprehend spoken and written texts from variety of authentic sources as well as produce compositions containing well-developed ideas on various topics. This course is based on Virginia Standards for French language FIV aligned with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages DELF A2 junior.

By the end of Grade 10, students are expected to:

  • Understand phrases and the highest frequency vocabulary related to areas of most immediate personal relevance.
  • Read very short, simple texts and find specific, predictable information in simple everyday material.
  • Communicate in simple and routine tasks requiring a simple and direct exchange of information on familiar topics and activities.
  • Write short, simple notes and messages relating to matters in areas of immediate need.

 

German

In the High School German course, students are able to exchange and support opinions on more complex topics in German. They comprehend spoken and written texts from a variety of authentic sources as well as produce compositions containing well-developed ideas on various topics. This course is based on Virginia Standards for German language aligned with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

By the end of Grade 10, students are expected to:

  • Develop their communicative competence by interacting orally and in writing with other German speakers
  • Understand oral and written messages in German, and making oral and written presentations in German.
  • Communicate on a variety of topics at a level commensurate with their study, using more complex structures in German and moving from concrete to more abstract concepts.

 

Art

Student develop the ability to recognize visual arts content, concepts, and skills needed to create, discuss, and understand original works of art. Students use art-making processes to communicate ideas and personal life experiences. They maintain portfolios documenting their artistic growth. They select representative work to take to the next level of study.

By the end of Grade 10, students are expected to:

  • Adhere to ethical choices when creating works of art and design.
  • Select and apply elements of art and principles of design to communicate meaning in works of art.
  • Combine a variety of perspective techniques, including one-point perspective, to create the illusion of space within works of art.
  • Use a variety of drawing media and processes to create observational and expressive works of art.

 

Physical Education

Students complete the transition from modified versions of movement forms to more complex applications across all types of physical activities. This may include outdoor pursuits, fitness activities, dance and rhythmic activities, aquatics, individual performance activities, and games and sports (net/wall, striking/fielding, and goal/target). Students demonstrate the ability to use basic skills, strategies, and tactics in a variety of lifetime physical activities.. They apply their understanding of personal fitness to lifelong participation in physical activity. Students demonstrate independence in making choices, respecting others, avoiding conflict, resolving conflicts appropriately, and using elements of fair play and ethical behavior in physical activity settings. Students demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and abilities required to plan for and improve components of fitness and achieve and maintain a health-enhancing level of personal fitness.

By the end of Grade 10, students are expected to:

  • Analyze movement activities for component skills and movement patterns for one or more lifetime activities.
  • Identify and explain the relationship of opposing muscle groups (agonist/antagonist).
  • Design and implement a program for strength and conditioning.
  • Explain why blood pressure is an indicator of personal health.
  • Apply rate of perceived exertion (RPE) and pacing to a conditioning plan that meets the needs of one or more lifetime activities.

 

Music

During the high school years, students focus on Theory. They integrate aspects of melody, harmony, rhythm, form, analysis, and composition. Emphasis is placed on reading and writing musical notation, developing aural skills such as listening and taking dictation, sight-singing, and using the keyboard. Students recognize, describe, and apply the basic materials and processes of music through an integrated approach, which includes aural, written, creative, and analytical components. Students address these basic concepts by listening to and analyzing a wide variety of music, including standard Western tonal music, contemporary art music, jazz, popular music, and world music. Students use critical-thinking skills to study musical concepts.

By the end of high school students are expected to:

  • Echo, read, and notate music, rhythms, and rhythmic patterns.
  • Identify, read, compare, contrast, and perform music.
  • Identify and notate key signatures of scales and literature being performed
  • Identify, compare, contrast, and perform music written in sonata
  • Use music composition as a means of expression
  • Define and apply music terminology found in the music.
  • Explore historical and cultural aspects of music.
  • Analyze and evaluate music.
  • Investigate aesthetic concepts related to music.

English

The High School English Language Arts curriculum is aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The English Language Arts course provides a balance of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language cumulative skills essential for success in the 21st Century. This course is designed to extend the range of oral communication, reading, writing, and media literacy skills that students need. Students interpret, analyze, compare, and evaluate a variety of literary, informational and graphic texts. Students compose a variety of genres at increasing levels of difficulty each year and learn to use and adjust language in all writing tasks to best communicate ideas, content, and message to readers. They use organizational skills, audience awareness, and both verbal and nonverbal presentation skills to plan and deliver effective oral presentations. Students show mastery of the conventions of academic language.

By the end of Grade 11, students are expected to:

  • Interpret, analyze, and evaluate narratives, poetry, and drama artistically and ethically by making connections to other texts, ideas, cultural perspectives, eras, personal events and situations.
  • Analyze foundational U.S. documents of historical and literary significance for their themes, purposes, and rhetorical features.
  • Use narrative strategies within argument and explanation within narrative to produce complex and nuanced writing.
  • Use technology strategically to create, refine, and update individual or shared writing products and present the relationships between information and ideas efficiently as well as to interact and collaborate with others.
  • Conduct more sustained research projects to solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
  • Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.
  • Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions and with diverse partners on grade 11 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • Present information, findings, and supporting evidence, conveying a clear and distinct perspective, such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning, alternative or opposing perspectives are addressed, and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and a range of formal and informal tasks.

 

Mathematics

In High school we are following Common Core standards for Math, which aim to create a more standardized math curriculum across the country. The Common Core standards state that six content categories should be covered in high school math classes are algebra, functions, modeling, geometry, statistics, and probability. The typical order of math classes in high school is as follows: algebra 1 and geometry in grade 9, algebra 2/trigonometry in grade 10, Pre-Calculus in grade 11, calculus and statistics in grade 12.

By the end of Grade 11, students are expected to:

  • Understand independence and conditional probability and use them to interpret data.
  • Use the rules of probability to compute probabilities of compound events in a uniform probability model.
  • Use probability to evaluate outcomes of decisions.
  • Have deep understanding of all kinds of functions and their real life application.
  • Be able to perform limits and their applications.
  • Calculate expected values and use them to solve problems.

 

Science

During grades nine to twelve, students begin to form deeper connections between concepts and skills previously learned such as applying statistics to scientific questions, evaluating limitations of models, and creating algorithms to solve problems. Students learn how to analyze major global challenges, design a solution to a complex real- world problem by breaking it down into smaller and more manageable problems that can be solved through engineering, and to evaluate solutions and then model the impact of the proposed solutions.

By the end of the Modern Chemistry course, Grade 11 students are expected to:

  • Use the periodic table as a model to predict the relative properties of elements based on the patterns of electrons in the outermost energy level of atoms.
  • Construct and revise an explanation for the outcome of a simple chemical reaction based on the outermost electron states of atoms, trends in the periodic table, and knowledge of the patterns of chemical properties.
  • Develop a model to illustrate that the release or absorption of energy from a chemical reaction system depends upon the changes in total bond energy.
  • Plan and conduct an investigation to provide evidence that the transfer of thermal energy when two components of different temperatures are combined within a closed system results in a more uniform energy distribution among the components in the system (second law of thermodynamics).
  • Develop models to illustrate the changes in the composition of the nucleus of the atom and the energy released during the processes of fission, fusion, and radioactive decay.

 

Social Studies

Students explore the historical context of key developments that shaped the United States, its identity and culture, and its role in the global community.  This course which traces the social, economic, and political development of the United States from colonial times to the present extends student’s ability to apply the concepts of historical thinking and the historical inquiry process, including the interpretation and analysis of evidence, when investigating forces in American history.

By the end of the History course, Grade 11 students are expected to:

  • Demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographic analysis, and economic decision making.
  • Use maps, globes, photographs, pictures, or tables to interpret data.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the effects of Reconstruction on American life.
  • Apply social science skills to understand how life changed after the Civil War; the changing role of the United States from the late nineteenth century through World War I; the social, economic, and technological changes of the early twentieth century; the major causes and effects of American involvement in World War II; e the economic, social, and political transformation of the United States and the world between the end of World War II and the present; and the key domestic and international issues during the second half of the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries

 

Computer

During high school, students gain proficiency of programs which they may utilize in their professional and personal lives. Depending on their grade level and their major, students gain skills in a number of curriculums. Students who study MS-Visual Studio learn the basic concepts of programming from typing blocks of codes to running simple programs of their own design. Students master advanced programs in animation such as Adobe Flash and learn coding to enhance the quality of animating objects.  Students are introduced to HTML Coding to learn the fundamentals of how websites are constructed and run. Students learn Digital Arts using the Adobe Package of Illustrator: InDesign Photoshop.  They produce professional Digital Art Products which is beneficial for students who will later major in applied arts. Students learn multimedia using the Adobe Package of Premiere , After Effect, and  Audition.  Students in grade twelve may choose between learning Auto Desk Package which is AutoCAD 2D -3D and 3D MAX or programming  depending on what they would like to major in later on in university.

By the end of Grade 11, students are expected to:

  • Be proficient in the use of Multimedia.
  • Use different professional programs for video editing and visual effects.
  • Produce documentary movies and short movies as a final project.
  • Use Adobe Audition, Premiere,  After Effect

 

French

In the High school French course, students are able to exchange and support opinions on more complex topics in French. They comprehend spoken and written texts from variety of authentic sources as well as produce compositions containing well-developed ideas on various topics. This course is based on Virginia Standards for French language FIV aligned with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages DELF A2 junior.

By the end of Grade 11, students are expected to:

  • Understand the essential information from short, recorded passages dealing with predictable everyday matters which are delivered slowly and clearly.
  • Understand short, simple texts containing the highest frequency vocabulary, including a proportion of shared international vocabulary items.
  • Interact with reasonable ease in structured situations and short conversations, provided the other person helps if necessary.
  • Write a very simple personal letter, for example thanking someone for something.
  • Identify the main point of TV news items reporting events, accidents etc. where the visual supports the commentary.

 

German

In the High School German course, students are able to exchange and support opinions on more complex topics in German. They comprehend spoken and written texts from a variety of authentic sources as well as produce compositions containing well-developed ideas on various topics. This course is based on Virginia Standards for German language aligned with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

By the end of Grade 11, students are expected to:

  • Understand the main points of clear standard speech on familiar matters regularly encountered in work, school, leisure, etc.
  • Understand the main point of many radio or TV programs on current affairs or topics of personal or professional interest when the delivery is relatively slow and clear.
  • Understand texts that consist mainly of high frequency everyday or job related language.
  • Understand the description of events, feelings and wishes in personal letters.
  • Deal with most situations likely to arise whilst travelling in an area where the language is spoken.
  • Connect phrases in a simple way in order to describe experiences and events, his dreams, hopes and ambitions.
  • Write simple connected text on topics which are familiar or of personal interest.
  • Write personal letters describing experiences and impressions.

 

Art

Student develop the ability to recognize visual arts content, concepts, and skills needed to create, discuss, and understand original works of art. Students use art-making processes to communicate ideas and personal life experiences. They maintain portfolios documenting their artistic growth. They select representative work to take to the next level of study.

By the end of Grade 11, students are expected to:

  • Articulate the difference between personal preference and informed judgment when discussing works of art.
  • Describe aesthetic qualities found in works of art.
  • Analyze the functions, purposes, and perceived meanings of works of design.
  • Formulate a definition for art and defend that definition in relation to objects in the world.
  • Use personal criteria when making visual aesthetic judgments.

 

Physical Education

Students complete the transition from modified versions of movement forms to more complex applications across all types of physical activities. This may include outdoor pursuits, fitness activities, dance and rhythmic activities, aquatics, individual performance activities, and games and sports (net/wall, striking/fielding, and goal/target). Students demonstrate the ability to use basic skills, strategies, and tactics in a variety of lifetime physical activities.. They apply their understanding of personal fitness to lifelong participation in physical activity. Students demonstrate independence in making choices, respecting others, avoiding conflict, resolving conflicts appropriately, and using elements of fair play and ethical behavior in physical activity settings. Students demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and abilities required to plan for and improve components of fitness and achieve and maintain a health-enhancing level of personal fitness.

By the end of Grade 11, students are expected to:

  • Participate independently in health-enhancing physical fitness activities.
  • Evaluate and adjust activity levels to meet personal fitness goals.
  • Design and critique a personal fitness program, using available technology and resources.
  • Identify the physical and mental benefits of physical fitness.
  • Maintain a health-enhancing level of physical fitness.

 

Music

During the high school years, students focus on Theory. They integrate aspects of melody, harmony, rhythm, form, analysis, and composition. Emphasis is placed on reading and writing musical notation, developing aural skills such as listening and taking dictation, sight-singing, and using the keyboard. Students recognize, describe, and apply the basic materials and processes of music through an integrated approach, which includes aural, written, creative, and analytical components. Students address these basic concepts by listening to and analyzing a wide variety of music, including standard Western tonal music, contemporary art music, jazz, popular music, and world music. Students use critical-thinking skills to study musical concepts.

By the end of high school students are expected to:

  • Echo, read, and notate music, rhythms, and rhythmic patterns.
  • Identify, read, compare, contrast, and perform music.
  • Identify and notate key signatures of scales and literature being performed
  • Identify, compare, contrast, and perform music written in sonata
  • Use music composition as a means of expression
  • Define and apply music terminology found in the music.
  • Explore historical and cultural aspects of music.
  • Analyze and evaluate music.
  • Investigate aesthetic concepts related to music.

English

The High School English Language Arts curriculum is aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The English Language Arts course provides a balance of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language cumulative skills essential for success in the 21st Century. This course is designed to extend the range of oral communication, reading, writing, and media literacy skills that students need. Students interpret, analyze, compare, and evaluate a variety of literary, informational and graphic texts. Students compose a variety of genres at increasing levels of difficulty each year and learn to use and adjust language in all writing tasks to best communicate ideas, content, and message to readers. They use organizational skills, audience awareness, and both verbal and nonverbal presentation skills to plan and deliver effective oral presentations. Students show mastery of the conventions of academic language.

By the end of Grade 12, students are expected to:

  • Read, analyze, and evaluate a wide variety of print (fiction, nonfiction, drama, and poetry/lyrics), and visual/multimedia texts (e.g., film, journalism, television, advertising, music videos, social media).
  • Write a range of complex texts for a variety of audiences and purposes (expressive, persuasive, persuasive research, visual/multimedia, and creative multi -genre collection) using a range of strategies to enhance clarity, precision, and effectiveness.
  • Use technology strategically to create, refine, and update individual or shared writing products and present the relationships between information and ideas efficiently as well as to interact and collaborate with others.
  • Conduct more sustained research projects to solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
  • Apply knowledge of grammar, language conventions and structure to effectively communicate through written expression.
  • Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions and with diverse partners on grade 12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.

 

Mathematics

In High school we are following Common Core standards for Math, which aim to create a more standardized math curriculum across the country. The Common Core standards state that six content categories should be covered in high school math classes are Algebra, Functions, Modeling, Geometry, Statistics, and Probability. The typical order of math classes in high school is as follows: Algebra 1 and Geometry in grade 9, Algebra 2/Trigonometry in grade 10, Pre-Calculus in grade 11, Calculus and Statistics in grade 12.

By the end of Grade 12, students are expected to:

  • Be able to perform limits problems and their applications.
  • Perform differentiation and Integration with their different kinds and their applications as well.
  • Apply different statistical concepts and put them in use in real life.
  • Be able to perform problems related to mechanics and apply them to real life situations.

 

Science

During grades nine to twelve, students begin to form deeper connections between concepts and skills previously learned such as applying statistics to scientific questions, evaluating limitations of models, and creating algorithms to solve problems. Students learn how to analyze major global challenges, design a solution to a complex real- world problem by breaking it down into smaller and more manageable problems that can be solved through engineering, and to evaluate solutions and then model the impact of the proposed solutions.

By the end of the Advanced Biology course, Grade 12 students are expected to:

  • Communicate scientific information about how different body systems provide specific functions to maintain homeostasis within multi-cellular organisms.
  • Use a model to illustrate how photosynthesis transforms light energy into stored chemical energy, and how cellular respiration is a chemical process whereby the bonds of food molecules and oxygen molecules are broken, and the bonds in new compounds are formed resulting in a net transfer of energy.
  • Communicate scientific information that common ancestry and biological evolution are supported by multiple lines of empirical evidence, and how natural selection leads to adaptation of populations.

By the end of the Environmental Science course, Grade 12 students are expected to:

  • Analyze a major global challenge to specify qualitative and quantitative criteria and constraints for solutions that account for societal needs and wants.
  • Construct an explanation based on evidence for how the availability of natural resources, occurrence of natural hazards, and changes in climate have influenced human activity
  • Develop a model to illustrate the components of the biosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and geo-sphere and analyze geo-scientific data to make the claim that one change to Earth’s surface can create feedbacks that cause changes to other Earth systems.
  • Illustrate the relationships among the management of natural resources, the sustainability of human populations, and biodiversity, then design, evaluate, and refine a solution for reducing the impacts of human activities on the environment and biodiversity.
  • Evaluate major contributions by developing technologies that produce less pollution and waste and that preclude ecosystem degradation.

By the end of the Physics course, Grade 12 students are expected to:

  • Recognize linear relationship between displacement and time from graphed data. Where appropriate, draw a straight line through a set of experimental data points and determine the slope and/or area under the curve.
  • Analyze acceleration and falling objects’ motion using graphs and kinematic equations.
  • Combine and resolve vectors utilizing trigonometric or graphical methods. Draw vector diagrams of a projectile’s motion. Find range, trajectory, height of the projectile, and time of flight (uniform gravitational field, no air resistance).
  • Analyze data to support the claim that Newton’s second law of motion describes the mathematical relationship among the net force on a macroscopic object, its mass, and its acceleration.
  • Provide and explain examples of how energy can be converted from potential energy to kinetic energy and the reverse and create a model to calculate the change in the energy of one component in a system when the change in energy of the other component(s) and energy flows in and out of the system are known.

 

Social Studies

Egyptian History (Non-Scientific)

Students study Ancient Egypt, which was one of the longest-lasting civilizations the world has ever known.  Students explore Egypt’s broad political, economic, social, and cultural developments, from the mighty civilization of the past to the diverse cultural and political landscape, covering almost 6,000 years of history.

By the end of the Egyptian History course, Grade 12 students (Non-scientific) are expected to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of the Egyptian geography, traditions and culture, the time-line of the ancient Egyptian’s history, the periods of glory and decline emphasizing on the reasons and consequences, and the reasons that led to the rise of the Mamluks and the Ottoman occupation.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the effects of the Industrial Revolution during the nineteenth century, the British Occupation during the nineteenth century.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the effects of Demonstrate knowledge of the struggle for independence during the twentieth Century, the roots of the Palestinian dilemma, transformations and change in internal and external politics in post-colonial Egypt.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of political, economic, social, and cultural aspects of the Sadat era and contemporary Egypt.

 

Psychology (Elective)

Students study psychology which is defined as “the study of the mind and behavior. The discipline embraces all aspects of the human experience—from the functions of the brain to the actions of nations, from child development to care for the aged. . . In every conceivable setting . . . ‘the understanding of behavior’ is the enterprise of psychologists.” Students gain a general understanding of psychology by integrating thinking skills, scientific processes, and content so that they are able to apply their learning to their own lives. Students learn about concepts they talk about and live from a psychological academic point of view including stress, intelligence, theories of personality and psychological disorders.

By the end of the Psychology course, Grade 12 students are expected to:

  • Analyze concepts related to the measurement and nature of intelligence.
  • Describe behavioral, social and cognitive changes from the prenatal period throughout the life span.
  • Identify major theories and concepts related to motivation and emotion.
  • Students will evaluate assessment tools and theories in personality.
  • Discuss the components of stress.
  • Identify abnormal behavior and treatment.
  • Analyze the impact of the social environment on behaviors and attitudes

 

Economics (Elective)

Students develop a basic understanding of economic principles in order to gain knowledge in various economics aspects. They study topics which include knowing the effect of supply and demand, an introduction to microeconomics, the importance of government, an introduction to macroeconomics, macro policies and trade, industrial organization and products costs, and market structures, including perfect and imperfect competition.

By the end of the Economics course, Grade 12 students are expected to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of basic economic concepts and structures.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the role of producers and consumers in a market economy.
  • Demonstrate knowledge that many factors affect income.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the price system, a nation’s economic goals, including full employment, stable prices, and economic growth, a nation’s financial system, and how monetary and fiscal policy influence employment, output, and prices.
  • Students will demonstrate knowledge of the global economy, planning for living and leisure expenses, banking transactions, credit and loan functions, the role of insurance in risk management, income earning and reporting, taxes, personal financial planning, and investment and savings planning.

 

Computer

During high school, students gain proficiency of programs which they may utilize in their professional and personal lives. Depending on their grade level and their major, students gain skills in a number of curriculums. Students who study MS-Visual Studio learn the basic concepts of programming from typing blocks of codes to running simple programs of their own design. Students master advanced programs in animation such as Adobe Flash and learn coding to enhance the quality of animating objects.  Students are introduced to HTML Coding to learn the fundamentals of how websites are constructed and run. Students learn Digital Arts using the Adobe Package of Illustrator: InDesign Photoshop.  They produce professional Digital Art Products which is beneficial for students who will later major in applied arts. Students learn multimedia using the Adobe Package of Premiere , After Effect, and  Audition.  Students in grade twelve may choose between learning Auto Desk Package which is AutoCAD 2D -3D and 3D MAX or programming  depending on what they would like to major in later on in university.

By the end of the Architecture course (Elective), Grade 12 students are expected to:

  • Apply the main skills of architecture designs
  • Learn how to do a plan design using the AutoCAD Application and converting the plan to a 3D object by using Autodesk 3D MAX Application.
  • Comprehend different plan perspectives such as the top –front –back – right view.
  • Render a virtual reality scene using 3D render.
  • Use Adobe Photo Shop for landscape details and internal decoration for apartments.

By the end of the Programming course (Elective), Grade 12 students are expected to:

  • Learn the main skills and basics of programming languages.
  • Use different professional programs for learning programming.
  • Use C++/ C#/ Java/Python.
  • Gain proficiency of oriented programming and number system conversion.

 

Art

Student develop the ability to recognize visual arts content, concepts, and skills needed to create, discuss, and understand original works of art. Students use art-making processes to communicate ideas and personal life experiences. They maintain portfolios documenting their artistic growth. They select representative work to take to the next level of study.

By the end of Grade 12, students are expected to:

  • Analyze major art movements and influential artists according to events, places, cultures, and historical periods.
  • Identify technological developments in the visual arts.
  • Analyze works of art as representational, abstract, or nonrepresentational, including nonobjective and conceptual.
  • Describe how the design process is used in various careers

 

Physical Education

Students complete the transition from modified versions of movement forms to more complex applications across all types of physical activities. This may include outdoor pursuits, fitness activities, dance and rhythmic activities, aquatics, individual performance activities, and games and sports (net/wall, striking/fielding, and goal/target). Students demonstrate the ability to use basic skills, strategies, and tactics in a variety of lifetime physical activities.. They apply their understanding of personal fitness to lifelong participation in physical activity. Students demonstrate independence in making choices, respecting others, avoiding conflict, resolving conflicts appropriately, and using elements of fair play and ethical behavior in physical activity settings. Students demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and abilities required to plan for and improve components of fitness and achieve and maintain a health-enhancing level of personal fitness.

By the end of Grade 12, students are expected to:

  • Exhibit a level of proficiency in all basic skills required for the selected activity and the ability to use the skills with consistency in the appropriate setting.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the rules and strategies of the selected activity, and apply them appropriately.
  • Explain and apply selected scientific principles (e.g., physiological, biomechanical) that aid in the improvement of skills and performance in specialized movement forms.
  • Integrate movement principles and concepts in order to analyze and improve the performance of self and others in specialized movement forms

 

Music

During the high school years, students focus on Theory. They integrate aspects of melody, harmony, rhythm, form, analysis, and composition. Emphasis is placed on reading and writing musical notation, developing aural skills such as listening and taking dictation, sight-singing, and using the keyboard. Students recognize, describe, and apply the basic materials and processes of music through an integrated approach, which includes aural, written, creative, and analytical components. Students address these basic concepts by listening to and analyzing a wide variety of music, including standard Western tonal music, contemporary art music, jazz, popular music, and world music. Students use critical-thinking skills to study musical concepts.

By the end of high school students are expected to:

  • Echo, read, and notate music, rhythms, and rhythmic patterns.
  • Identify, read, compare, contrast, and perform music.
  • Identify and notate key signatures of scales and literature being performed
  • Identify, compare, contrast, and perform music written in sonata
  • Use music composition as a means of expression
  • Define and apply music terminology found in the music.
  • Explore historical and cultural aspects of music.
  • Analyze and evaluate music.
  • Investigate aesthetic concepts related to music.

Course Selection for Grade 12

Grade 12 is a critical year for our students. It is a time when students solidify and reinforce study habits as well as expand their knowledge and skills. It is also a time when students select a study stream in scientific or non scientific areas of course content. Each student and family will need to examine these two areas and be prepared to select a package for their child’s grade 12 year. It is important to choose wisely since study streams cannot be changed once a student begins in a particular area.

All students take the common subjects. Students must choose between scientific and non-scientific packages.

Scientific

Non- Scientific

Common Subjects

Physics, Calculus,Advanced Biology

Environmental Science, Advanced Math, Egyptian History

English, Psychology, Economics, Art/Music/P.E Arabic, Religion

Graduation Requirements

DAIS requires a minimum of 24 High School units of credit, taken over eight semesters in Grades 9 through to 12 inclusively to graduate. The courses listed below are required to achieve graduation at the High School level.  A credit is defined in adherence to Carnegie credit hour standards.   The minimum requirement for graduation is a (C) average (2.00 GPA) overall.

Required Courses

Students must complete the following courses successfully to graduate:

Courses

Requirements

English

4 Credits

Mathematics

4 Credits

Science

4 Credits

Social Studies

4 Credits

Physical Education

2 Credits

Art/Music

2 Credits

World Languages

3 Credits

Arabic Language

4 Credits (Unless Exempted)

Technology

2.5 Credits

Electives

2 Credits

Any course taken beyond the number of units required in a given subject area is regarded as an elective in that subject area.

HIGH SCHOOL GRADING

The school year is divided into two semesters. Each semester is divided into two terms. At the close of each term, students receive a report card indicating the grades earned in each class. Absences, if any, are recorded on their report card which reflects attendance.  (Please Check our School Handbook for more information: Student Handbook)