Kindergarten School Academics

Kindergarten School

OUR PROGRAM OF STUDIES 

The curriculum provided to our Kindergarten students is woven into the projects and activities of the day. Social integration and the development of positive social skills is an integral part of our academic program. Our students learn to share and be supportive of each other while working together collaboratively on projects and classroom activities. They form strong friendships, their classmates and teachers becoming their family during the school hours. You can find our supply list for kindergarten school through this link. ( Kindegarten School Supplies)

  • Physical Development

    Through opportunities for physical play, our students become progressively more skilled at tasks that require body co-ordination, becoming more aware of how they can use their bodies to express ideas and feelings.  They achieve this by moving in different ways as they respond to their moods and feelings or to music or imaginative ideas.

    During the Pre-Kindergarten year, children are exposed to:

    • a range of different ways in which to use their bodies in physical activity.

    • energetic activities both indoors and outdoors.

    • music and imaginative ideas through rhythmic and expressive Movement.

    • running, jumping, skipping, climbing, balancing, throwing and catching with increasing skill and confidence.

    • working with others cooperatively in physical play and games.

    • activities using the fine motor movements of their fingers and hands.

    •  safety in using tools and equipment.

    Intellectual Development

    Intellectual development involves a child’s ability to think reason and solve problems. It includes forming concepts, remembering ideas and recognizing objects.

    During the Pre-Kindergarten year, children are exposed to:

    • Learning about colors and their names
    • Comparing objects
    • Shapes
    • Storytelling and responses to stories
    • Using English words to communicate
    • Making predictions
    • Measuring
    • Sequencing

    Social Development

    During this year, children learn to interact with new children and adults in their lives.  They learn social skills that include sharing, co-operating and following rules.

    During the Pre-Kindergarten year, children are exposed to: 

    • using gentle and kind play
    • listening to teachers, adults and classmates
    • taking turns while using classroom materials
    • sharing classroom materials and toys
    • cleaning up after themselves
    • using the words “please” and “thank you” when making a request. 

    Emotional Development

    Emotional development includes how a child feels about themselves, their self-esteem and their ability to express their feelings.

    During the Pre-Kindergarten year, children are exposed to:

    • frequent praise
    • age and developmentally appropriate materials through which students experience success
    • silly and funny stories to experience laughter
    • stories and explanations relating to differing emotions
    • boundaries, rules and expectations
    • expressing themselves through words and songs

    Language Development

    Language development is a significant focus at the Pre-Kindergarten level as children are learning to express themselves through words for the first time.

    During the Pre-Kindergarten year, children are exposed to :

    • Songs
    • finger plays
    • story telling
    • books and other environmental print
    • oral language activities and experiences
    • teacher’s modeling correct language use
    • resolving conflicts using words
    • activities using the fine motor movements of their fingers

    Activities

    Materials and concepts are largely presented to children through a variety of classroom centers.  The following is a description of a number of these widely used centers that are available in the classroom for our students to explore.

    Blocks

    Through interactive play with blocks, children develop concepts relating to size, shape, space, weight, balance and symmetry.  They also improve manipulative skills alongside language and social skills that include negotiating and compromising. In addition, they derive satisfaction from completing tasks which results in the enhancement of self-confidence.  Critical thinking skills are developed through planning and problem solving.

    The use of blocks is also the beginning of abstract thinking as children use objects to represent other things such as houses or car garages.

    Library

    In the library area children can improve and develop oral language, listening and reading skills, in addition to learning new concepts and developing a love of books.

    Drawing Table and Art Center

    The art center enhances creative expression.  Social skills, oral language, small motor and co-operative skills are all refined through the representation of ideas and the exploration of different art materials and concepts including size, shape, texture and color.  Children can express their feelings and find pleasure through art experiences.

    Clay

    While using clay, children strengthen their finger muscles which are used when writing.  They share ideas and materials, practice social skills and increase their vocabulary through actions.  Words such as cutting, slicing, pounding, squeezing and rolling are introduced while they creatively experiment with clay.

    Small Motor Center

    In small motor centers, children develop small muscles, eye hand co-ordination alongside spatial and perceptual skills.  They also increase their attention span, improve social skills and build concepts relating to size, shape, color and pattern.  Examples of the materials that children use include puzzles, pegboards, beads, play dough, Legos and clay.

    Music

    Through music, children improve their listening and motor skills, verbal expression and creativity.  They improve physical development through the exposure to beat, rhythm and tempo.  They derive personal enjoyment from joining in a melody and singing along in a group.

    Sand and Water Table

    Sand and water activities provide children with enjoyable sensory experiences while developing math concepts, language and small motor and social skills.

    Cooking

    Cooking is an integral part of the classroom.  Through cooking projects the children enjoy a variety of learning experiences that include all the technical functionalities of cooking such as scooping, grinding, pouring,etc. 

  • Language Arts

    The Language Arts program provides instruction in reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, phonics, vocabulary, handwriting and the structure of language. Instruction is carried out in a whole class setting, in small groups and on an individual basis where appropriate. A variety of methods and materials are used to teach basic skills, extend thinking and promote and refine the language development of our students.

    A wide range of techniques and methods emphasizing literature are used to teach Language Arts. Commercially produced materials are utilized in conjunction with teacher and student made materials to teach and develop skills appropriate to the age and development of each child.

    Students learn, develop and refine their reading, writing, speaking and listening skills through practice with their teacher and via peer support. A literature based approach to teaching exposes students to great works of children’s literature, promoting critical reading, thinking and discussion skills as a love of reading is fostered.

    Reading

    Through our literature based approach to teaching and learning our Kindergarten students are exposed to the written word to develop their literacy and readings skills.

    By the end of Kindergarten 1 it is anticipated that our students will be able to:

    • identify character, setting conflict and solutions
    • match and write upper and lower case letters
    • identify rhyming sounds and words
    • sort and classify pictures and objects into categories
    • retell and organize a familiar story into sequence
    • show interest in books and stories
    • read and write their first name
    • attach meaning and print to pictures
    • recognize letters and their sounds
    • practice writing by copying print

    Speaking and Listening

    During the school year, our students will be encouraged to:

    • express ideas clearly

    • make relevant contributions to group discussions

    • participate in the interpretation of literature through art and music by acting out a story or finger play

    • understand how to take turns in conversational situations


    Fine Motor Development

    By the end of Kindergarten 1 it is anticipated that our students will be able to:

    • demonstrate motor skills including cutting, gluing, trading, coloring and folding
    • demonstrate self-help skills including dressing, zipping, buttoning, tying and snapping
    • demonstrate pencil control

    Math

    In our Mathematics program our students are active individuals who construct, modify and integrate ideas by interacting with materials, the world around them and their peers. Thus, the learning of mathematics becomes an active process whereby our students explore, justify, present, solve, construct, discuss, investigate, describe, develop and predict. These actions require the physical and mental involvement of our students.

    Such a curriculum has the following characteristics:

    • students are actively involved in learning Mathematics
    • students are actively involved in problem solving, thinking, reasoning and communicating
    • manipulatives are used to connect conceptual to procedural Understanding
    • By the end of the school year the following Math concepts will be covered:
    • numbers and number sense
    • numeration – using objects to explore numbers by counting forward and backwards
    • reading numbers
    • ordering numbers to 20
    • estimation – using objects to estimate quantity and measurement patterns
    • relationship and function – using objects to recognize and create repeating and growing patterns and using these patterns to make predictions
    • geometry – identifying basic geometric shapes such as squares and circles and using objects to develop spatial senses such as puzzles and pattern blocks
    • measurements – using objects to explore non-standard measurements
    • statistics and probability – participating in the creation and comparison of group graphs and investigating, sorting and classifying objects by many attributes 

    Social Studies and Social Development

    Social Studies concepts and skills are developed throughout the Elementary school years in an ever-broadening perspective. In Kindergarten 1 emphasis is placed on understanding the role of individuals within the family, school and community.

    Map and globe skills are introduced as the student begins to understand how groups of people interrelate and depend on each other. Current events and important national, international holidays and celebrations are discussed.

    By the end of Kindergarten 1 students are expected to be able to:

    • show an individual awareness of self as a member of the family and community 
    • name and understand the role of community helpers 
    • show awareness of different cultures 
    • play and work co-operatively 
    • respect themselves, others and the environment 
    • share and take turns 
    • seek appropriate amounts of adult attention 
    • follow classroom rules 
    • accept the roles of leaders and followers 
    • display self-control
    • accept responsibility for behavior and work 
    • make good decisions 

    Science

    The Science program is largely presented as an activity oriented subject and covers all major science areas including biology, life science and physical science. These skills are precursors to the primary grades where students are taught skills in observing, recording information, classifying and predicting.

    By the end of the school year students are expected to be able to:

    • demonstrate basic scientific skills in observing, classifying and predicting
    • understand the relationship between earth and the environment
    • demonstrate curiosity and a willingness to explore and experiment
    • recognize and use some common forms of technology
  • Language Arts

    The Language Arts program provides instruction in reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, phonics, vocabulary, handwriting and the structure of language. Instruction is carried out in a whole class setting, in small groups and on an individual basis where appropriate. A variety of methods and materials are used to teach basic skills, extend thinking and promote and refine the language development of our students.
    A wide range of techniques and methods emphasizing literature are used to teach Language Arts. Commercially produced materials are utilized in conjunction with teacher and student made materials to teach and develop skills appropriate to the age and development of each child.
    Students learn, develop and refine their reading, writing, speaking and listening skills through practice with their teacher and via peer support. A literature based approach to teaching exposes students to great works of children’s literature, promoting critical reading, thinking and discussion skills as a love of reading is fostered.

    Reading

    Through our literature based approach to teaching and learning our Kindergarten students are exposed to the written word to develop their literacy and readings skills.
    By the end of Kindergarten II it is anticipated that our students will be able to :

    • identify character, setting conflict and solutions
    • match and write upper and lower case letters
    • identify rhyming sounds and words
    • sort and classify pictures and objects into categories
    • retell and organize a familiar story into sequence
    • show interest in books and stories
    • recognize and read their first and last names and simple vocabulary
    • understand concepts of print including left to right progression and top to bottom orientation using pictures, objects or text

    Writing and Handwriting

    • By the end of the school year Kindergarten II students will be able to:
    • attach meaning to pictures via print
    • hear and record sounds in words
    • practice writing by copying print
    • legibly form upper and lower case manuscript letters
    • legibly form the numerals 0 – 20
    • use inventive spelling

    Speaking and Listening

     During the school year, our students will be encouraged to:

    • express ideas clearly
    • make relevant contributions to group discussions
    • participate in the interpretation of literature through art and music
    • understand how to take turns in conversational situations 
    • tell a story to describe their drawings

    Fine Motor Development

    By the end of Kindergarten II it is anticipated that our students will be able to:

    • demonstrate motor skills including cutting, gluing, trading, coloring and folding

    • demonstrate self-help skills including dressing, zipping, buttoning, tying and snapping

    • demonstrate pencil control

    Math

    The learning of Math is an active process. Manipulatives are used to connect conception to procedural understanding.

    By the end of the school year students will be able to:

    • demonstrate an understanding of sets and whole numbers
    • measure and compare the length, weight, mass, capacity and temperature of objects and demonstrate an awareness of the passage of time
    • identify the characteristics of two dimensional shapes and three dimensional objects
    • recognize and use patterns
    • collect, display and interpret data in daily activities
    • show a willingness to persevere in solving problems
    • identify a clock as a means of measuring time

    Social Studies and Social Development

    Social Studies concepts and skills are developed throughout the elementary school years in an ever-broadening perspective. In Kindergarten II emphasis is placed on understanding the role of individuals within the family, school and community.

    Map and globe skills are introduced as the student begins to understand how groups of people interrelate and depend on each other. Current events and important national, international holidays and celebrations are discussed.

    By the end of Kindergarten II students are expected to be able to:

    • show an individual awareness of self as a member of the family and community 
    • name and understand the role of community helpers 
    • show awareness of different cultures 
    • play and work co-operatively 
    • respect themselves, others and the environment 
    • share and take turns 
    • seek appropriate amounts of adult attention 
    • follow classroom rules 
    • accept the roles of leaders and followers 
    • display self-control
    • accept responsibility for behavior and work 
    • make good decisions 

    Science

    The Science program is presented as active, hands on subject.

    By the end of the school year students are expected to be able to:

    • demonstrate curiosity and a willingness to explore and experiment
    • demonstrate an understanding of and care for the natural world
    • demonstrate an awareness of the characteristics and functions of some common materials
    • demonstrate an understanding of strategies for planning and organizing
    • recognize and use some common forms of technology

KINDERGARTEN SCHOOL GRADING

The school year is divided into two semesters. Each semester is divided into two terms. At the close of each term, students receive a report card indicating the grades earned in each class. Absences, if any, are recorded on their report card which reflects attendance. (Please Check our School Handbook for more information: Student Handbook)

  • Pre-Kindergarten through to Grade 2 do not receive letter grades. Alternatively, narrative accounts of strengths and weaknesses are given by teachers every nine weeks along with indicators and progress.

    Midway through each term, progress reports are given to each student. These must be signed by a parent and returned to the teacher within seven days of distribution. Communication with parents following receipt of these reports to discuss their child’s performance is encouraged.

    A letter grade is given for work completed. as follows:

    Rubric Letters Grade Level
    E Excellent (Exceeds Grade Level Expectations)
    P Proficient (Meets Grade Level Expectations)
    C Capable (Progressing toward Grade Level Expectations)
    N Needs Improvement (Not making steady progress toward Grade Level Expectations)
    S With Support (Requires support from another adult)
    N/A NA Not Applicable this Term
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